Long-term Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Early Childhood

Summary

Principal Investigator: Ann Geers
Country: USA
Abstract: The proposed study measures auditory, speech, cognitive and academic development and self-esteem in deaf adolescents who received a cochlear implant in preschool. In the past, individuals with prelingual profound deafness have often exhibited substantial educational delays, even in the presence of normal cognitive ability. Such students exhibit 4-6-year average delays in English language and literacy development throughout high school and speech that is minimally understood by inexperienced listeners. These delays have been associated with reduced vocational opportunities and isolation from the majority hearing culture. The advent of cochlear implant technology may constitute a new era in deaf education. The documented auditory, speech and English language skills of young cochlear implant users greatly exceed those of hearing aid users with similar degree of hearing loss. This study will examine performance of adolescents who are long-term cochlear implant users by following a group of 181 children from across North America who were among the first in the world to receive cochlear implants in preschool. These children were first tested when they were in early elementary school (age 8-9). The proposed study will re-evaluate them when they are in late high school (age 16-17). Because the achievement gap between deaf and hearing students tends to increase with age, the early advantages seen in young cochlear implant users may be found to diminish in adolescence. Little is known about the role of auditory speech perception skills in vocabulary and language comprehension during high school, when language is acquired by reading in addition to listening and watching. We will test a structural model of literacy as students approach adulthood and examine the effects of improved speech perception on predicted outcome. Although self-esteem measures conducted at age 8 and 9 year revealed high levels of perceived self-competence, self-image ratings may decrease in high school, particularly for those who identify with neither a Deaf nor a hearing community. The purpose of the proposed study is to identify those factors that contribute to positive outcomes in high school students with cochlear implants and educational programs that promote these outcomes. In addition we will document the incidence and outcomes associated with discontinued use of a cochlear implant.
Funding Period: 2007-04-01 - 2010-03-31
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Cochlear implant characteristics and speech perception skills of adolescents with long-term device use
    Lisa S Davidson
    Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Otol Neurotol 31:1310-4. 2010
  2. pmc Spoken word recognition in adolescent cochlear implant users during quiet and multispeaker babble conditions
    Emily A Tobey
    Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, Callier Advanced Hearing Research Program, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas 75235, USA
    Otol Neurotol 32:413-8. 2011
  3. pmc Statistical analysis and interpretation in a follow-up study of prelingually deaf children implanted before 5 years of age
    Michael J Strube
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    Ear Hear 32:13S-8S. 2011
  4. pmc Factors contributing to speech perception scores in long-term pediatric cochlear implant users
    Lisa S Davidson
    Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Ear Hear 32:19S-26S. 2011
  5. pmc Language and verbal reasoning skills in adolescents with 10 or more years of cochlear implant experience
    Ann E Geers
    Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, Callier Advanced Hearing Research Center, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas 75235, USA
    Ear Hear 32:39S-48S. 2011
  6. pmc Psychosocial adjustment in adolescents who have used cochlear implants since preschool
    Jean S Moog
    Moog Center for Deaf Education, St Louis, Missouri 63131, USA
    Ear Hear 32:75S-83S. 2011
  7. pmc A longitudinal study of speech perception skills and device characteristics of adolescent cochlear implant users
    Elizabeth J Robinson
    Program in Audiology and Communication Sciences, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    J Am Acad Audiol 23:341-9. 2012

Scientific Experts

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Cochlear implant characteristics and speech perception skills of adolescents with long-term device use
    Lisa S Davidson
    Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Otol Neurotol 31:1310-4. 2010
    ..We hypothesized that updated speech processors and lower aided thresholds would allow improved recognition of soft speech without compromising performance in noise...
  2. pmc Spoken word recognition in adolescent cochlear implant users during quiet and multispeaker babble conditions
    Emily A Tobey
    Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, Callier Advanced Hearing Research Program, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas 75235, USA
    Otol Neurotol 32:413-8. 2011
    ..To assess overall speech intelligibility in adolescent cochlear implant speakers during quiet and multispeaker babble conditions...
  3. pmc Statistical analysis and interpretation in a follow-up study of prelingually deaf children implanted before 5 years of age
    Michael J Strube
    Department of Psychology, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    Ear Hear 32:13S-8S. 2011
    ..A final challenge was the need to preserve sample size in the presence of attrition from the initial data collection period and missing data...
  4. pmc Factors contributing to speech perception scores in long-term pediatric cochlear implant users
    Lisa S Davidson
    Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Ear Hear 32:19S-26S. 2011
    ..e., noise and lower intensity levels) at adolescence; and (3) examine the relation of speech perception scores to speech and language development over this longitudinal timeframe...
  5. pmc Language and verbal reasoning skills in adolescents with 10 or more years of cochlear implant experience
    Ann E Geers
    Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, Callier Advanced Hearing Research Center, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas 75235, USA
    Ear Hear 32:39S-48S. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study is to identify factors predictive of successful English language outcomes in adolescents who received a cochlear implant (CI) between 2 and 5 yrs of age...
  6. pmc Psychosocial adjustment in adolescents who have used cochlear implants since preschool
    Jean S Moog
    Moog Center for Deaf Education, St Louis, Missouri 63131, USA
    Ear Hear 32:75S-83S. 2011
    ....
  7. pmc A longitudinal study of speech perception skills and device characteristics of adolescent cochlear implant users
    Elizabeth J Robinson
    Program in Audiology and Communication Sciences, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    J Am Acad Audiol 23:341-9. 2012
    ..It is unknown whether these benefits continue over time as these children reach adolescence...