Long-Term Dietary Risk Factor Assessment and Incident AD

Summary

Principal Investigator: MARTHA MORRIS
Abstract: This application proposes to investigate hypotheses on the associations of long-term dietary intake of a number of micro nutrients and dietary fats with incident Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline in an existing biracial population study, the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP). Recent findings by this group of investigators and others suggest that dietary intake of folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 may be protective against incident Alzheimer's disease. Others propose that the mechanism for protection by these micronutrients may be through reduction in the accumulation of homocysteine. In addition, we found that intake of antioxidant nutrients and dietary fat composition may be important in the development of Alzheimer's disease, although associations for intakes of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, the n-3 fatty acids, alpha-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, vitamin C, and vitamin E supplement use were unclear or marginally significant. The CHAP study provides many essential elements to test these dietary hypotheses including, a prospective design, a validated dietary assessment tool, structured clinical evaluation for unbiased case detection, and up to 15 years of cognitive change data on more than 6,000 persons. However, because the ongoing CHAP study is being greatly expanded to include newly age-eligible cohorts as the original cohort decreases in size due to mortality, and the only existing dietary data is at baseline on the original cohort, it is not currently possible to take advantage of the increased statistical power and longer follow-up of the expanded study. Therefore, in order to account for intraindividual variation in dietary intake over the long follow-up period, and to test conclusively these new and exciting dietary hypotheses, the proposed study will: 1) conduct repeated dietary assessments in the entire CHAP study community to accurately measure long-term intake, and 2) conduct biochemical analyses of banked blood samples for plasma homocysteine concentration. The proposed application should help to answer important scientific questions on the dietary prevention of a debilitating disease that affects a large number of older persons.
Funding Period: 2004-08-15 - 2010-06-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Is dietary intake of folate too low?
    Martha Clare Morris
    Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Lancet 369:166-7. 2007
  2. pmc The role of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease: epidemiological evidence
    M C Morris
    Section of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
    Eur J Neurol 16:1-7. 2009
  3. ncbi Mediterranean diet and depressive symptoms among older adults over time
    K A Skarupski
    Rush University Medical Center, 1653 West Congress Pkwy, Kidston Building, Suite 606 Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    J Nutr Health Aging 17:441-5. 2013
  4. pmc Temporal course of depressive symptoms during the development of Alzheimer disease
    R S Wilson
    Rush Alzheimer s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, 600 South Paulina St, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Neurology 75:21-6. 2010
  5. pmc Change in risk of Alzheimer disease over time
    L E Hebert
    Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, 1645 W Jackson Blvd Suite 675, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Neurology 75:786-91. 2010
  6. pmc Cognitive activity and the cognitive morbidity of Alzheimer disease
    R S Wilson
    Rush Alzheimer s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Neurology 75:990-6. 2010

Scientific Experts

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc Is dietary intake of folate too low?
    Martha Clare Morris
    Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Lancet 369:166-7. 2007
  2. pmc The role of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease: epidemiological evidence
    M C Morris
    Section of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
    Eur J Neurol 16:1-7. 2009
    ..This review will focus on epidemiological evidence investigating the relationship between nutrition and AD, focusing particularly on the roles of dietary fats and antioxidants...
  3. ncbi Mediterranean diet and depressive symptoms among older adults over time
    K A Skarupski
    Rush University Medical Center, 1653 West Congress Pkwy, Kidston Building, Suite 606 Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    J Nutr Health Aging 17:441-5. 2013
    ..To examine whether adherence to a Mediterranean-based dietary pattern is predictive of depressive symptoms among older adults...
  4. pmc Temporal course of depressive symptoms during the development of Alzheimer disease
    R S Wilson
    Rush Alzheimer s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, 600 South Paulina St, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Neurology 75:21-6. 2010
    ..To characterize change in depressive symptoms before and after the onset of dementia in Alzheimer disease (AD)...
  5. pmc Change in risk of Alzheimer disease over time
    L E Hebert
    Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, 1645 W Jackson Blvd Suite 675, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Neurology 75:786-91. 2010
    ..The increase in numbers of people at the oldest ages in the population will bring an increase in the number of people with AD. Projections of the size of the increase assume the risk of AD is constant...
  6. pmc Cognitive activity and the cognitive morbidity of Alzheimer disease
    R S Wilson
    Rush Alzheimer s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Neurology 75:990-6. 2010
    ..To test the hypothesis that frequent cognitive activity predicts slower cognitive decline before dementia onset in Alzheimer disease (AD) and faster decline thereafter...