Youth Drinking: The Effects of Alcohol Control Policies and Adult Drinking Patte

Summary

Principal Investigator: TIMOTHY SIMONDS NAIMI
Affiliation: Boston University
Country: USA
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Youth drinking is dangerous and leads to variety of health and social problems, including alcohol-related problems during adulthood. Alcohol control policies are designed to reduce excessive alcohol consumption and related harms. Because alcohol consumption by youths is widely perceived as an age-specific problem, most policy interventions target youthful drinkers primarily or exclusively. Such policy design may not be ideal, however, because youth learn drinking behaviors and obtain most alcoholic beverages from adults. Furthermore, some policies that target the general population also reduce youth drinking. Therefore, the notion that youth drinking is an age-specific phenomenon that should be addressed through youth-specific policies may result in inadequate efforts to reduce youth drinking. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the effects that alcohol control policies and adult drinking patterns have on youth drinking, and to determine whether stronger policy environments, including those targeting the general population, might reduce youth drinking. To accomplish this goal, we will test 3 hypotheses: that the presence of a strong policy environment is protective against youth drinking and adult drinking;that adult drinking patterns are strongly related to those of youth;and that a strong alcohol policy environment protects against youth drinking, even after accounting for the effects of youth-specific policies and adult drinking patterns. The specific aims are to: 1) determine the association between alcohol control policies, including those that are adult-oriented and youth-specific, and youth drinking behaviors;2) to determine the association between adult drinking behaviors and youth drinking behaviors;3) to determine the association between adult-oriented alcohol policies and adult drinking behaviors;and 4) to determine whether adult-oriented alcohol control policies protect against youth drinking, while assessing the effects of youth- specific policies and adult drinking patterns. To assess youth and adult drinking behaviors, we will use data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey to do longitudinal analyses using multilevel modeling. With the assistance of an expert panel, we will develop a novel statistical tool to describe policy strength by state and year using data from the Alcohol Policy Information System (APIS). The results from this study will have implications for policy- related efforts to prevent youth drinking. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Because alcohol consumption by youths is perceived as an age-specific problem, most policy interventions target youthful drinkers. Such policy design may not be ideal, however, because youth learn drinking behaviors and obtain alcoholic beverages from adults, and some policies that target the general population reduce youth drinking. The goal of this four-year proposal is to understand the effects that alcohol control policies and adult drinking patterns have on youth drinking, and to determine whether stronger policy environments, including those targeting the general population, might reduce youth drinking. To assess youth drinking behaviors, we will do longitudinal analyses using individual-level data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. With the assistance of an expert panel, we will develop a novel statistical tool to describe policy strength by state and year using data from the Alcohol Policy Information System (APIS). The results from this study will have implications for policy-related efforts to prevent youth drinking, and the use of APIS is a research priority by NIAAA.
Funding Period: ----------------2009 - ---------------2013-
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Effectiveness of policies maintaining or restricting days of alcohol sales on excessive alcohol consumption and related harms
    Jennifer Cook Middleton
    Community Guide Branch, Epidemiology and Analysis Program Office, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Am J Prev Med 39:575-89. 2010
  2. pmc Effectiveness of policies restricting hours of alcohol sales in preventing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms
    Robert A Hahn
    Community Guide Branch of the Epidemiology and Analysis Program Office, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Am J Prev Med 39:590-604. 2010
  3. pmc Alcohol-attributable cancer deaths and years of potential life lost in the United States
    David E Nelson
    National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 7105, USA
    Am J Public Health 103:641-8. 2013
  4. pmc Tax policy, adult binge drinking, and youth alcohol consumption in the United States
    Ziming Xuan
    Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res 37:1713-9. 2013
  5. pmc Efficacy and the strength of evidence of U.S. alcohol control policies
    Toben F Nelson
    Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA
    Am J Prev Med 45:19-28. 2013
  6. pmc State-specific liquor excise taxes and retail prices in 8 US states, 2012
    Michael Siegel
    a Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Subst Abus 34:415-21. 2013
  7. pmc A new scale of the u.s. Alcohol policy environment and its relationship to binge drinking
    Timothy S Naimi
    Section of General Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts Electronic address
    Am J Prev Med 46:10-6. 2014
  8. pmc The impact of a 25-cent-per-drink alcohol tax increase
    James I Daley
    Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Massachusetts, USA
    Am J Prev Med 42:382-9. 2012

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Effectiveness of policies maintaining or restricting days of alcohol sales on excessive alcohol consumption and related harms
    Jennifer Cook Middleton
    Community Guide Branch, Epidemiology and Analysis Program Office, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Am J Prev Med 39:575-89. 2010
    ....
  2. pmc Effectiveness of policies restricting hours of alcohol sales in preventing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms
    Robert A Hahn
    Community Guide Branch of the Epidemiology and Analysis Program Office, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Am J Prev Med 39:590-604. 2010
    ..The evidence from six qualifying studies was insufficient to determine whether increasing hours of sale by less than 2 hours increases excessive alcohol consumption and related harms...
  3. pmc Alcohol-attributable cancer deaths and years of potential life lost in the United States
    David E Nelson
    National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 7105, USA
    Am J Public Health 103:641-8. 2013
    ..Our goal was to provide current estimates of alcohol-attributable cancer mortality and years of potential life lost (YPLL) in the United States...
  4. pmc Tax policy, adult binge drinking, and youth alcohol consumption in the United States
    Ziming Xuan
    Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res 37:1713-9. 2013
    ..Yet at a population level, few have examined the relationship between state-level adult binge drinking prevalence and youth drinking behaviors, or whether tax policy plays a role in this relationship...
  5. pmc Efficacy and the strength of evidence of U.S. alcohol control policies
    Toben F Nelson
    Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA
    Am J Prev Med 45:19-28. 2013
    ..Public policy can limit alcohol consumption and its associated harm, but no direct comparison of the relative efficacy of alcohol control policies exists for the U.S...
  6. pmc State-specific liquor excise taxes and retail prices in 8 US states, 2012
    Michael Siegel
    a Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Subst Abus 34:415-21. 2013
    ..0%. The authors find that excise taxes do increase the price of alcohol, but states are not taking advantage of this opportunity to reduce alcohol-related morbidity and mortality...
  7. pmc A new scale of the u.s. Alcohol policy environment and its relationship to binge drinking
    Timothy S Naimi
    Section of General Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts Electronic address
    Am J Prev Med 46:10-6. 2014
    ..The extent to which the alcohol policy environment accounts for differences in binge drinking in U.S. states is unknown...
  8. pmc The impact of a 25-cent-per-drink alcohol tax increase
    James I Daley
    Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Massachusetts, USA
    Am J Prev Med 42:382-9. 2012
    ..Although alcohol taxation is an effective measure to reduce excessive consumption and related harm, some argue that increasing alcohol taxes places an unfair economic burden on "responsible" drinkers and socially disadvantaged people...