Clinical and Research Training Program for Academic Vascular Medicine Specialists

Summary

Principal Investigator: Mark Creager
Affiliation: Massachusetts General Hospital
Country: USA
Abstract: Vascular diseases constitute some of the most common causes of disability and death in Western society. Yet, few physicians have chosen vascular disease as an area of clinical specialization. Academically oriented vascular medicine training programs are required to develop vascular medicine specialists with the leadership skills and academic credentials to educate future generations of vascular specialists. Accordingly, we propose to establish a comprehensive Vascular Medicine training program that includes: 1) a core clinical curriculum taught by a multidisciplinary faculty of vascular medicine physicians, vascular surgeons and vascular radiologists; 2) an extended didactic clinical research curriculum; and 3) a mentored clinical research experience. The proposed program will admit seven trainees, each for three years. The first year of the program will include clinical training and expose the trainee to all aspects of vascular medicine including peripheral arterial disease, renal and mesenteric vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, venous thromboembolism, venous insufficiency, lymphedema, vasculitis, vasospasm, and less common vascular disorders. Clinical time will be devoted to inpatient and outpatient vascular consultations, the noninvasive vascular laboratory, computed tomographic and magnetic resonance angiography, peripheral angiography, endovascular interventions and vascular surgery. The second and third years of training will emphasize clinical research. This will include an extended didactic clinical research curriculum emphasizing epidemiology, statistics, clinical trials design, and include principles of pharmacology, genetics in clinical investigation, bioethics and responsible research conduct and additional coursework leading to a Masters degree in Medical Science or Public Health, as appropriate given training and career goals. Coursework will be supplemented by research seminars and journal clubs. Trainees will work closely with mentors who will supervise their research activity and guide the trainees' career development. The mentored clinical research experience will include a vascular research project and teach skills in protocol development, experimental technique, methods, analysis, oral presentation, manuscript writing and grant preparation. Research activities will leverage the many clinical research programs and facilities that are available at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health. These resources will provide significant opportunities for the trainee to acquire clinical research skills and facilitate a successful transition towards independence as a clinical investigator. As a consequence of the intensive clinical and research training integrated in this program, we are confident that we will successfully prepare future academic leaders in the field of Vascular Medicine.
Funding Period: 2006-06-01 - 2011-05-31
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Serum total bilirubin level and prevalent lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999 to 2004
    Todd S Perlstein
    Brigham and Women s Hospital, Cardiovascular Division, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 28:166-72. 2008
  2. pmc Somatic inactivation of the PHD2 prolyl hydroxylase causes polycythemia and congestive heart failure
    Yoji Andrew Minamishima
    Department of Medical Oncology, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Blood 111:3236-44. 2008
  3. doi A randomized trial of iloprost in patients with intermittent claudication
    Mark A Creager
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Vasc Med 13:5-13. 2008
  4. pmc Aortitis
    Heather L Gornik
    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
    Circulation 117:3039-51. 2008
  5. pmc Association of insulin resistance and inflammation with peripheral arterial disease: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 to 2004
    Reena L Pande
    Brigham and Women s Hospital, Cardiovascular Division, 75 Francis St, A Bldg, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circulation 118:33-41. 2008
  6. pmc Serum total bilirubin level, prevalent stroke, and stroke outcomes: NHANES 1999-2004
    Todd S Perlstein
    Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Med 121:781-788.e1. 2008

Scientific Experts

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi Serum total bilirubin level and prevalent lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999 to 2004
    Todd S Perlstein
    Brigham and Women s Hospital, Cardiovascular Division, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 28:166-72. 2008
    ..We hypothesized that higher levels of bilirubin would reduce susceptibility to peripheral arterial disease (PAD)...
  2. pmc Somatic inactivation of the PHD2 prolyl hydroxylase causes polycythemia and congestive heart failure
    Yoji Andrew Minamishima
    Department of Medical Oncology, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Blood 111:3236-44. 2008
    ..The latter is likely the result of hyperviscosity syndrome and volume overload, although a direct effect of chronic, high-level HIF stimulation on cardiac myocytes cannot be excluded...
  3. doi A randomized trial of iloprost in patients with intermittent claudication
    Mark A Creager
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Vasc Med 13:5-13. 2008
    ..039). Neither iloprost nor pentoxifylline enhanced quality of life. These results indicate that oral iloprost is not effective in improving exercise performance or quality of life in patients with PAD who have intermittent claudication...
  4. pmc Aortitis
    Heather L Gornik
    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
    Circulation 117:3039-51. 2008
  5. pmc Association of insulin resistance and inflammation with peripheral arterial disease: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 to 2004
    Reena L Pande
    Brigham and Women s Hospital, Cardiovascular Division, 75 Francis St, A Bldg, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circulation 118:33-41. 2008
    ..We hypothesized that IR is associated with PAD and that the presence of IR would influence the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and PAD, an association established predominantly in healthy individuals...
  6. pmc Serum total bilirubin level, prevalent stroke, and stroke outcomes: NHANES 1999-2004
    Todd S Perlstein
    Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Med 121:781-788.e1. 2008
    ..Clinical data addressing the association of bilirubin with stroke are not available. We hypothesized that higher bilirubin levels would be associated with reduced stroke prevalence and improved stroke outcomes...