PGRP-SC2

Summary

Gene Symbol: PGRP-SC2
Description: PGRP-SC2
Alias: CG14745, CG14745 PGRP, Dmel\CG14745, PCRP-SC2, PGRP-SC, pgrp-sc2, PGRP-SC2, CG14745-PA, PGRP-SC2-PA, Peptidoglycan-recognition protein-SC2 precursor, peptidoglycan recognition protein SC2
Species: fruit fly

Top Publications

  1. Mellroth P, Karlsson J, Steiner H. A scavenger function for a Drosophila peptidoglycan recognition protein. J Biol Chem. 2003;278:7059-64 pubmed
    ..Furthermore, a sequence homology comparison with phage T7 lysozyme, also an N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase, shows that as many as six of the Drosophila PGRPs could belong to this class of proteins. ..
  2. Werner T, Liu G, Kang D, Ekengren S, Steiner H, Hultmark D. A family of peptidoglycan recognition proteins in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000;97:13772-7 pubmed
    ..We demonstrate that at least PGRP-SA and SC1B can bind peptidoglycan, and a function in immunity is likely for this family. ..
  3. Lazzaro B, Sceurman B, Clark A. Genetic basis of natural variation in D. melanogaster antibacterial immunity. Science. 2004;303:1873-6 pubmed
    ..Variation in these genes, therefore, seems to drive variability in immunocompetence among wild Drosophila. ..
  4. Lazzaro B, Sackton T, Clark A. Genetic variation in Drosophila melanogaster resistance to infection: a comparison across bacteria. Genetics. 2006;174:1539-54 pubmed
    ..lactis and E. faecalis, respectively, most of the molecular polymorphisms tested explain <10% of the total variance in bacterial load sustained after infection...
  5. Paredes J, Welchman D, Poidevin M, Lemaitre B. Negative regulation by amidase PGRPs shapes the Drosophila antibacterial response and protects the fly from innocuous infection. Immunity. 2011;35:770-9 pubmed publisher
    ..Analysis of the immune phenotype of flies lacking all catalytic PGRPs and the Imd regulator Pirk reveals that the Imd-mediated immune response is highly constrained by the existence of multiple negative feedbacks. ..
  6. Petersen A, Rimkus S, Wassarman D. ATM kinase inhibition in glial cells activates the innate immune response and causes neurodegeneration in Drosophila. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012;109:E656-64 pubmed publisher
  7. Petersen A, Katzenberger R, Wassarman D. The innate immune response transcription factor relish is necessary for neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of ataxia-telangiectasia. Genetics. 2013;194:133-42 pubmed publisher
    ..In summary, these findings suggest that neurodegeneration in human A-T is caused by activation of a specific NF-?B protein in glial cells. ..
  8. Douglas A. The molecular basis of bacterial-insect symbiosis. J Mol Biol. 2014;426:3830-7 pubmed publisher
  9. Bischoff V, Vignal C, Duvic B, Boneca I, Hoffmann J, Royet J. Downregulation of the Drosophila immune response by peptidoglycan-recognition proteins SC1 and SC2. PLoS Pathog. 2006;2:e14 pubmed
    ..We further show that a strict control of IMD-pathway activation is essential to prevent bacteria-induced developmental defects and larval death. ..

More Information

Publications18

  1. Wagner C, Isermann K, Fehrenbach H, Roeder T. Molecular architecture of the fruit fly's airway epithelial immune system. BMC Genomics. 2008;9:446 pubmed publisher
    ..This architecture will allow reacting if confronted with different bacterial or fungal elicitors by activation of a multitude of effectors. ..
  2. Horner M, Pardee K, Liu S, King Jones K, Lajoie G, Edwards A, et al. The Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and regulates cholesterol homeostasis. Genes Dev. 2009;23:2711-6 pubmed publisher
    ..These studies define DHR96 as a central regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. ..
  3. Chen H, Zheng X, Zheng Y. Age-associated loss of lamin-B leads to systemic inflammation and gut hyperplasia. Cell. 2014;159:829-43 pubmed publisher
    ..paperflick: ..
  4. Ma D, Storelli G, Mitchell M, Leulier F. Studying host-microbiota mutualism in Drosophila: Harnessing the power of gnotobiotic flies. Biomed J. 2015;38:285-93 pubmed publisher
  5. Fan X, Liang Q, Lian T, Wu Q, Gaur U, Li D, et al. Rapamycin preserves gut homeostasis during Drosophila aging. Oncotarget. 2015;6:35274-83 pubmed publisher
    ..These results will further explain the mechanism of healthspan and lifespan extension by rapamycin in Drosophila. ..
  6. Hang S, Purdy A, Robins W, Wang Z, Mandal M, Chang S, et al. The acetate switch of an intestinal pathogen disrupts host insulin signaling and lipid metabolism. Cell Host Microbe. 2014;16:592-604 pubmed publisher
    ..Thus, acetate consumption by V. cholerae alters host metabolism, and dietary acetate supplementation may ameliorate some sequelae of cholera. ..
  7. Jasper H. Exploring the physiology and pathology of aging in the intestine of Drosophila melanogaster. Invertebr Reprod Dev. 2015;59:51-58 pubmed
    ..Here, I review recent studies exploring age-related changes in the fly intestine, and their insight into the regulation of health and lifespan of the animal. ..
  8. Ye Y, Chenoweth S, McGraw E. Effective but costly, evolved mechanisms of defense against a virulent opportunistic pathogen in Drosophila melanogaster. PLoS Pathog. 2009;5:e1000385 pubmed publisher
    ..aeruginosa infection than previously reported. This work reveals novel pathways by which Drosophila can survive infection with a virulent pathogen that may be rare in wild populations, however, due to their cost. ..
  9. Jiggins F, Hurst G. The evolution of parasite recognition genes in the innate immune system: purifying selection on Drosophila melanogaster peptidoglycan recognition proteins. J Mol Evol. 2003;57:598-605 pubmed publisher
    ..Therefore, interactions between these genes are unlikely to be the focus of host-parasite coevolution, at least in Drosophila. We also found evidence of gene conversion occurring between two genes, PGRP-SC1A and PGRP-SC1B...