Glyn A Vale

Summary

Publications

  1. pmc Factors affecting the propensity of tsetse flies to enter houses and attack humans inside: increased risk of sleeping sickness in warmer climates
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, UK
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7:e2193. 2013
  2. pmc A neglected aspect of the epidemiology of sleeping sickness: the propensity of the tsetse fly vector to enter houses
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7:e2086. 2013
  3. pmc Towards an early warning system for Rhodesian sleeping sickness in savannah areas: man-like traps for tsetse flies
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 6:e1978. 2012
  4. pmc Explaining the host-finding behavior of blood-sucking insects: computerized simulation of the effects of habitat geometry on tsetse fly movement
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom Southern African Centre for Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 8:e2901. 2014
  5. pmc Is the even distribution of insecticide-treated cattle essential for tsetse control? Modelling the impact of baits in heterogeneous environments
    Steve J Torr
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 5:e1360. 2011
  6. pmc How do tsetse recognise their hosts? The role of shape in the responses of tsetse (Glossina fuscipes and G. palpalis) to artificial hosts
    Inaki Tirados
    Natural Resource Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, Kent, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 5:e1226. 2011
  7. pmc Where, when and why do tsetse contact humans? Answers from studies in a national park of Zimbabwe
    Stephen J Torr
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 6:e1791. 2012
  8. ncbi request reprint Towards a rational policy for dealing with tsetse
    Stephen J Torr
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
    Trends Parasitol 21:537-41. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. pmc Factors affecting the propensity of tsetse flies to enter houses and attack humans inside: increased risk of sleeping sickness in warmer climates
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, UK
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7:e2193. 2013
    ..Factors affecting human/tsetse contact in buildings need identification...
  2. pmc A neglected aspect of the epidemiology of sleeping sickness: the propensity of the tsetse fly vector to enter houses
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7:e2086. 2013
    ..Hence, we need to know more about tsetse in buildings, and to understand why, when and how they enter such places...
  3. pmc Towards an early warning system for Rhodesian sleeping sickness in savannah areas: man-like traps for tsetse flies
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 6:e1978. 2012
    ..To monitor changes in risk, we need traps designed specifically to quantify the responsiveness of savannah tsetse to humans, but the traps currently available are designed to simulate other hosts...
  4. pmc Explaining the host-finding behavior of blood-sucking insects: computerized simulation of the effects of habitat geometry on tsetse fly movement
    Glyn A Vale
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom Southern African Centre for Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 8:e2901. 2014
    ..For example, why is it that the species occupying savannahs, unlike those of riverine habitats, appear strongly responsive to odor, rely mainly on large hosts, are repelled by humans, and are often shy of alighting on baits?..
  5. pmc Is the even distribution of insecticide-treated cattle essential for tsetse control? Modelling the impact of baits in heterogeneous environments
    Steve J Torr
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 5:e1360. 2011
    ..A deterministic simulation model was used to analyse the effects of spatial heterogeneities in habitat and baits (insecticide-treated cattle and targets) on the distribution and abundance of tsetse...
  6. pmc How do tsetse recognise their hosts? The role of shape in the responses of tsetse (Glossina fuscipes and G. palpalis) to artificial hosts
    Inaki Tirados
    Natural Resource Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, Kent, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 5:e1226. 2011
    ..25 × 0.25 m(2). The preference of G. p. palpalis for vertical oblongs is unique amongst tsetse species, and it is suggested that this response might be related to its anthropophagic behaviour and hence importance as a vector of HAT...
  7. pmc Where, when and why do tsetse contact humans? Answers from studies in a national park of Zimbabwe
    Stephen J Torr
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 6:e1791. 2012
    ..Hence, it takes a long time to catch many savannah tsetse from people, which in turn means that studies of the nature of contact between savannah tsetse and humans, and the ways of minimizing it, have been largely neglected...
  8. ncbi request reprint Towards a rational policy for dealing with tsetse
    Stephen J Torr
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
    Trends Parasitol 21:537-41. 2005
    ....