Laurie R Santos

Summary

Affiliation: Yale University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Object individuation using property/kind information in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cognition 83:241-64. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Expectations about numerical events in four lemur species (Eulemur fulvus, Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta and Varecia rubra)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Anim Cogn 8:253-62. 2005
  3. doi request reprint Comparative cognition: united we stand
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, Box 208205, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Curr Biol 21:R951-3. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Economic cognition in humans and animals: the search for core mechanisms
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 19:63-6. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint How prosimian primates represent tools: experiments with two lemur species (Eulemur fulvus and Lemur catta)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Comp Psychol 119:394-403. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Probing the limits of tool competence: experiments with two non-tool-using species (Cercopithecus aethiops and Saguinus oedipus)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, Box 208205, New Haven, CT, USA
    Anim Cogn 9:94-109. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Primate cognition: putting two and two together
    Laurie R Santos
    Yale University, Department of Psychology, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Curr Biol 15:R545-7. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Means-means-end tool choice in cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus): finding the limits on primates' knowledge of tools
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
    Anim Cogn 8:236-46. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint 'Core knowledges': a dissociation between spatiotemporal knowledge and contact-mechanics in a non-human primate?
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, USA
    Dev Sci 7:167-74. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Representing tools: how two non-human primate species distinguish between the functionally relevant and irrelevant features of a tool
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Anim Cogn 6:269-81. 2003

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. ncbi request reprint Object individuation using property/kind information in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cognition 83:241-64. 2002
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Expectations about numerical events in four lemur species (Eulemur fulvus, Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta and Varecia rubra)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Anim Cogn 8:253-62. 2005
    ..These results suggest that some prosimian primates understand the outcome of simple arithmetic operations. These results are discussed in light of similar findings in human infants and other adult primates...
  3. doi request reprint Comparative cognition: united we stand
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, Box 208205, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Curr Biol 21:R951-3. 2011
    ..Humans engage in collaborative activities far more often than do members of any other species. Two recent studies explore why this is the case. Are humans uniquely motivated to work together?..
  4. doi request reprint Economic cognition in humans and animals: the search for core mechanisms
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 19:63-6. 2009
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint How prosimian primates represent tools: experiments with two lemur species (Eulemur fulvus and Lemur catta)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Comp Psychol 119:394-403. 2005
    ..Subjects performed well on these problems, sometimes modifying the position of the tool. These results are discussed in light of the performance of other primates on this task...
  6. ncbi request reprint Probing the limits of tool competence: experiments with two non-tool-using species (Cercopithecus aethiops and Saguinus oedipus)
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, Box 208205, New Haven, CT, USA
    Anim Cogn 9:94-109. 2006
    ..These results provide further evidence that tool-use may derive from domain-general, rather than domain-specific cognitive capacities that evolved for tool use per se...
  7. ncbi request reprint Primate cognition: putting two and two together
    Laurie R Santos
    Yale University, Department of Psychology, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Curr Biol 15:R545-7. 2005
    ..The human mind has the capacity for abstract numerical representations that cut across different sensory modalities. New research with monkeys shows that this mathematical achievement is not unique to our species...
  8. ncbi request reprint Means-means-end tool choice in cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus): finding the limits on primates' knowledge of tools
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
    Anim Cogn 8:236-46. 2005
    ..Subjects readily transferred to new connections. Our results therefore provide the first evidence to date that tamarins can learn to solve problems involving two tools, but that they do so only with sufficient training...
  9. ncbi request reprint 'Core knowledges': a dissociation between spatiotemporal knowledge and contact-mechanics in a non-human primate?
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, USA
    Dev Sci 7:167-74. 2004
    ..This dissociation between contact-mechanical and spatiotemporal knowledge is discussed in light of developmental theories of core knowledge and the literature on object-based attention in human adults...
  10. ncbi request reprint Representing tools: how two non-human primate species distinguish between the functionally relevant and irrelevant features of a tool
    Laurie R Santos
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Anim Cogn 6:269-81. 2003
    ..We propose that some non-human primates begin with a predisposition to attend to a tool's shape and, with sufficient experience, develop a more sophisticated understanding of the features that are functionally relevant to tools...
  11. doi request reprint Enumeration of objects and substances in non-human primates: experiments with brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus)
    Neha Mahajan
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
    Dev Sci 12:920-8. 2009
    ..In contrast to human infants, however, lemurs successfully enumerated non-cohesive objects that broke into multiple pieces. These results are discussed in light of recent theories about object processing in human infants and adults...
  12. doi request reprint 'Unwilling' versus 'unable': capuchin monkeys' (Cebus apella) understanding of human intentional action
    Webb Phillips
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, USA
    Dev Sci 12:938-45. 2009
    ..Taken together with the previous evidence, the present research suggests that our own intention reading is not a wholly unique aspect of the human species, but rather is shared broadly across the primate order...
  13. doi request reprint Essentialism in the absence of language? Evidence from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)
    Webb Phillips
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, USA
    Dev Sci 13:F1-7. 2010
    ..These results therefore suggest that some essentialist expectations may emerge in the absence of language, and thus raise the possibility that such tendencies may emerge earlier in human development than has previously been considered...
  14. pmc Reflections of other minds: how primate social cognition can inform the function of mirror neurons
    Derek E Lyons
    Yale University, Department of Psychology, PO Box 208205, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 8205, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 16:230-4. 2006
    ..We are thus left with a fascinating question: if not imitation, what are mirror neurons for? Recent advances in the study of non-human primate social cognition suggest a surprising potential answer...
  15. ncbi request reprint Dynamic object individuation in rhesus macaques: a study of the tunnel effect
    Jonathan I Flombaum
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:795-800. 2004
    ..With further control conditions, this experiment demonstrates a spatiotemporal bias-similar to a bias found in adult visual perception-in the computation of object persistence in the context of a dynamic correspondence problem...
  16. doi request reprint "The evolution of intergroup bias: Perceptions and attitudes in rhesus macaques": Retraction of Mahajan, Martinez, Gutierrez, Diesendruck, Banaji, and Santos (2011)
    Neha Mahajan
    Department of Psychology, Yale University
    J Pers Soc Psychol 106:182. 2014
    ..As such, these studies suggest that the architecture of the mind that enables the formation of these biases may be rooted in phylogenetically ancient mechanisms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). ..
  17. pmc Young children are more generous when others are aware of their actions
    Kristin L Leimgruber
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e48292. 2012
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Units of visual individuation in rhesus macaques: objects or unbound features?
    Erik W Cheries
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 8205, USA
    Perception 35:1057-71. 2006
    ..This pattern of results demonstrates that feature binding is used in subtle ways to guide ecologically relevant behavior in a non-human animal, spontaneously and reliably, in its natural environment...
  19. pmc Endowment effect in capuchin monkeys
    Venkat Lakshminaryanan
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:3837-44. 2008
    ....
  20. doi request reprint The evolution of intergroup bias: perceptions and attitudes in rhesus macaques
    Neha Mahajan
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 100:387-405. 2011
    ..As such, these studies suggest that the architecture of the mind that enables the formation of these biases may be rooted in phylogenetically ancient mechanisms...
  21. ncbi request reprint How capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) quantify objects and substances
    Kristy VanMarle
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
    J Comp Psychol 120:416-26. 2006
    ..This finding suggests that capuchins quantify objects and substances similarly and do so via analog magnitude representations...
  22. doi request reprint Monkeys represent others' knowledge but not their beliefs
    Drew C W Marticorena
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Dev Sci 14:1406-16. 2011
    ..The capacity to represent beliefs may therefore be a unique hallmark of human cognition...
  23. ncbi request reprint Rhesus monkeys attribute perceptions to others
    Jonathan I Flombaum
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Curr Biol 15:447-52. 2005
    ..Moreover, they raise the possibility that, in primates, cortical cells thought to encode where others are looking [7] may encode what those individuals see as well...
  24. ncbi request reprint Evidence for kind representations in the absence of language: experiments with rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)
    Webb Phillips
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, USA
    Cognition 102:455-63. 2007
    ..Although these data provide the best evidence to date that language is not necessary to represent kinds, we discuss our findings in terms of possible associative hypotheses as well...
  25. ncbi request reprint The origins of cognitive dissonance: evidence from children and monkeys
    Louisa C Egan
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Psychol Sci 18:978-83. 2007
    ..They suggest that the mechanisms underlying cognitive-dissonance reduction in human adults may have originated both developmentally and evolutionarily earlier than previously thought...
  26. pmc Helping behaviour and regard for others in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella)
    Jennifer L Barnes
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Biol Lett 4:638-40. 2008
    ....
  27. pmc Core knowledge and its limits: the domain of food
    Kristin Shutts
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Cognition 112:120-40. 2009
    ..The category-specific patterns of perception and categorization shown by human adults, children, and adult monkeys therefore were not found in human infants, providing evidence for limits to infants' domains of knowledge...
  28. doi request reprint Children's and adults' judgments of equitable resource distributions
    Koleen McCrink
    33 Kirkland Street, William James Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Dev Sci 13:37-45. 2010
    ..These results are discussed in light of their implications for equity theory and for theories of the development of social evaluation...
  29. ncbi request reprint Primate brains in the wild: the sensory bases for social interactions
    Asif A Ghazanfar
    Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany
    Nat Rev Neurosci 5:603-16. 2004