DAVID DONNELLY

Summary

Affiliation: Yale University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Voltage-gated Na(+) channels in chemoreceptor afferent neurons--potential roles and changes with development
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Respir Physiol Neurobiol 185:67-74. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Developmental changes in the magnitude and activation characteristics of Na(+) currents of petrosal neurons projecting to the carotid body
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Respir Physiol Neurobiol 177:284-93. 2011
  3. pmc Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors do not mediate excitatory transmission in young rat carotid body
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 107:1806-16. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Spontaneous action potential generation due to persistent sodium channel currents in simulated carotid body afferent fibers
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 104:1394-401. 2008
  5. pmc Orthodromic spike generation from electrical stimuli in the rat carotid body: implications for the afferent spike generation process
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Physiol 580:275-84. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Mitochondrial function and carotid body transduction
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    High Alt Med Biol 6:121-32. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Development of carotid body/petrosal ganglion response to hypoxia
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Respir Physiol Neurobiol 149:191-9. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Developmental aspects of oxygen sensing by the carotid body
    D F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 88:2296-301. 2000
  9. ncbi request reprint Single-unit recordings of arterial chemoreceptors from mouse petrosal ganglia in vitro
    D F Donnelly
    Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 88:1489-95. 2000
  10. pmc O2 deprivation induces a major depolarization in brain stem neurons in the adult but not in the neonatal rat
    G G Haddad
    Department of Pediatrics Section of Respiratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510
    J Physiol 429:411-28. 1990

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications31

  1. pmc Voltage-gated Na(+) channels in chemoreceptor afferent neurons--potential roles and changes with development
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Respir Physiol Neurobiol 185:67-74. 2013
    ..This may be a significant contributor to maturation of chemoreceptor activity in the post-natal period...
  2. doi request reprint Developmental changes in the magnitude and activation characteristics of Na(+) currents of petrosal neurons projecting to the carotid body
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Respir Physiol Neurobiol 177:284-93. 2011
    ..These results suggest that a developmental shift in Na(+) current activation plays a role in chemoreceptor maturation by enhancing excitability of the afferent neuron...
  3. pmc Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors do not mediate excitatory transmission in young rat carotid body
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 107:1806-16. 2009
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Spontaneous action potential generation due to persistent sodium channel currents in simulated carotid body afferent fibers
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 104:1394-401. 2008
    ..Taken together, the results suggest that an endogenous process in chemoreceptor nerve terminals may underlie AP generation, a process independent of synaptic depolarizing events...
  5. pmc Orthodromic spike generation from electrical stimuli in the rat carotid body: implications for the afferent spike generation process
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Physiol 580:275-84. 2007
    ..These results suggest that AP generation is not due to SDP events; rather, AP generation is likely to be due to a process endogenous to the nerve terminals that modulates the variability of nerve terminal excitability...
  6. ncbi request reprint Mitochondrial function and carotid body transduction
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    High Alt Med Biol 6:121-32. 2005
    ..Such manipulation may be useful for the treatment of hypoventilation syndromes or high altitude accommodation...
  7. ncbi request reprint Development of carotid body/petrosal ganglion response to hypoxia
    David F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Respir Physiol Neurobiol 149:191-9. 2005
    ..Thus, developmental changes and environmental factors may significantly change the ability of an animal to detect and respond to hypoxic insults, perhaps leading to periods of heightened vulnerability to hypoxic stresses...
  8. ncbi request reprint Developmental aspects of oxygen sensing by the carotid body
    D F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 88:2296-301. 2000
    ..Although many questions remain, especially with regard to the coupling of glomus cells to nerve endings, the use of cellular and molecular techniques should offer resolution in the near future...
  9. ncbi request reprint Single-unit recordings of arterial chemoreceptors from mouse petrosal ganglia in vitro
    D F Donnelly
    Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    J Appl Physiol 88:1489-95. 2000
    ..The use of mice for chemoreceptor studies may be advantageous because targeted gene deletions are well developed in the mouse model and may be useful in addressing unresolved questions regarding the mechanism of chemotransduction...
  10. pmc O2 deprivation induces a major depolarization in brain stem neurons in the adult but not in the neonatal rat
    G G Haddad
    Department of Pediatrics Section of Respiratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510
    J Physiol 429:411-28. 1990
    ..The reason(s) for the difference in Ko+ is not known but could be due, to some extent, to different rates of intracellular ATP depletion and failure of the Na(+)-K+ pump...
  11. ncbi request reprint Are oxygen dependent K+ channels essential for carotid body chemo-transduction?
    D F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06524, USA
    Respir Physiol 110:211-8. 1997
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Patch clamp recording from the intact dorsal root ganglion
    J M Zhang
    Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Neurosci Methods 79:97-103. 1998
    ..Both TTX-resistant (TTX-R) and TTX-sensitive (TTX-S currents) were demonstrated in the present study. The results demonstrate the feasibility of patch-clamp recording from intact, identified DRG cells in vitro...
  13. ncbi request reprint K+ currents of glomus cells and chemosensory functions of carotid body
    D F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06524, USA
    Respir Physiol 115:151-60. 1999
    ..Thus, at present, hypoxic inhibition to a K+ channel in the glomus cell may initiate chemotransduction but there are many unanswered questions, especially the failure of K+ channel blocking agents to emulate the hypoxic response...
  14. pmc Effect of sodium perturbations on rat chemoreceptor spike generation: implications for a Poisson model
    D F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Section of Respiratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    J Physiol 511:301-11. 1998
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Chemotransduction by carotid body chemoreceptors is dependent on bicarbonate currents
    J M Panisello
    Section of Critical Care and Applied Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Respir Physiol 112:265-81. 1998
    ..We conclude that bicarbonate greatly enhances stimulus/secretion coupling in glomus cells, probably through modulation of an anion current carried by bicarbonate...
  16. ncbi request reprint MCP-1 enhances excitability of nociceptive neurons in chronically compressed dorsal root ganglia
    J H Sun
    Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    J Neurophysiol 96:2189-99. 2006
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Effects of a chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion on voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents in cutaneous afferent neurons
    Z Y Tan
    Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    J Neurophysiol 95:1115-23. 2006
    ..The reduction in Ka, the hyperpolarizing shift in TTX-S Na+ current activation, and the enhanced TTX-R Na+ current may all contribute to the enhanced neuronal excitability and thus to the pain and hyperalgesia associated with CCD...
  18. doi request reprint Time-dependence of hyperoxia-induced impairment in peripheral chemoreceptor activity and glomus cell calcium response
    J L Carroll
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 648:299-306. 2009
    ..The time course indicates that hyperoxia exerts these effects within days...
  19. ncbi request reprint Prolonged apnea and impaired survival in piglets after sinus and aortic nerve section
    D F Donnelly
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520
    J Appl Physiol 68:1048-52. 1990
    ....
  20. pmc Fluoresceinated peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a marker for live O(2) sensing glomus cells in rat carotid body
    I Kim
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 648:185-90. 2009
    ..Thus fluoresceinated PNA may be a useful marker for live CB glomus studies, without adversely affecting their physiologic response...
  21. ncbi request reprint Integration of bronchomotor and ventilatory responses to chemoreceptor stimulation in developing sheep
    J J PEREZ FONTAN
    Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis Children s Hospital, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Respir Physiol 111:1-13. 1998
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Characterization and developmental changes of Na+ currents of petrosal neurons with projections to the carotid body
    Theodore R Cummins
    Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven Connecticut 06510, USA
    J Neurophysiol 88:2993-3002. 2002
    ....
  23. doi request reprint Assisting Mother Nature in postnatal chemoreceptor maturation
    David F Donnelly
    J Appl Physiol 104:1260-1. 2008
  24. ncbi request reprint Chemoreceptor activity is normal in mice lacking the NK1 receptor
    Ricardo Rigual
    Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular y Fisiología Instituto de Biología y Genética Molecular Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Valladolid Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Valladolid, Spain
    Eur J Neurosci 16:2078-84. 2002
    ..It may therefore be concluded that loss of NK1 receptors has little effect on chemoreceptor function in the mouse, and thus they play, at best, a minor role in the hypoxic chemoreception process...
  25. ncbi request reprint Lamotrigine and phenytoin, but not amiodarone, impair peripheral chemoreceptor responses to hypoxia
    Edward Vincent S Faustino
    Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, PO Box 208064, New Haven, CT 06520 8064, USA
    J Appl Physiol 101:1633-40. 2006
    ..These are consistent with I(NaP) serving an important function in AP generation and may be clinically important in the care of patients using these drugs...
  26. ncbi request reprint An important functional role of persistent Na+ current in carotid body hypoxia transduction
    Edward Vincent S Faustino
    Department of Pediatrics, Section of Critical Care and Applied Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, PO Box 208064, New Haven, CT 06520 8064, USA
    J Appl Physiol 101:1076-84. 2006
    ..We conclude that I(NaP) is present in chemoreceptor afferent neurons and serves an important role in peripheral chemoreceptor function and, hence, in the ventilatory response to hypoxia...
  27. ncbi request reprint Upregulation of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current after chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion
    Hang Yao
    Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA
    J Neurosci 23:2069-74. 2003
    ..Because I(h) activation provides a depolarizing current to the neuron, thus enhancing neuronal excitability, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that I(h) contributes to hyperalgesia after CCD-induced nerve injury...
  28. ncbi request reprint Modulation of gene expression in subfamilies of TASK K+ channels by chronic hyperoxia exposure in rat carotid body
    Insook Kim
    Dept of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 580:37-41; discussion 351-9. 2006
  29. ncbi request reprint Perinatal hyperoxia for 14 days increases nerve conduction time and the acute unitary response to hypoxia of rat carotid body chemoreceptors
    David F Donnelly
    Dept of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, 800 Marshall St, Little Rock, AR 72202 3591, USA
    J Appl Physiol 99:114-9. 2005
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Cortical delta-opioid receptors potentiate K+ homeostasis during anoxia and oxygen-glucose deprivation
    Dongman Chao
    Department of Pediatrics, Section of Respiratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 27:356-68. 2007
    ..We conclude that an important aspect of DOR-mediated neuroprotection is its early action against derangement of K(+) homeostasis during anoxia or ischemia...
  31. ncbi request reprint The effect of development on the pattern of A1 and A2a-adenosine receptor gene and protein expression in rat peripheral arterial chemoreceptors
    Estelle B Gauda
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 580:121-9; discussion 351-9. 2006

Research Grants8

  1. Carotid Body Chemoreception: Mechanism & Development
    DAVID DONNELLY; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..If supported, the model should lead to a pharmacologic targeting of these processes for the improved treatment of apnea and/or dyspnea. ..
  2. Mechanism of perinatal-hyperoxic suppression of chemoreceptor function
    DAVID DONNELLY; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Since hyperoxia is extensively used clinically in newborn and, especially in premature infants, these results are important in understanding physiologic alterations caused by this intervention. ..
  3. Mechanism of perinatal-hyperoxic suppression of chemoreceptor function
    David F Donnelly; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Since hyperoxia is extensively used clinically in newborn and, especially in premature infants, these results are important in understanding physiologic alterations caused by this intervention. ..