G Allen Burton

Summary

Affiliation: Wright State University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Determining stressor presence in streams receiving urban and agricultural runoff: development of a benthic in situ toxicity identification evaluation method
    Kevin W Custer
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 25:2299-305. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint An in situ toxicity identification evaluation method Part I: Laboratory validation
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 23:2844-50. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Characterizing sediment acid volatile sulfide concentrations in European streams
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:1-12. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Field validation of sediment zinc toxicity
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 24:541-53. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint In situ exposures using caged organisms: a multi-compartment approach to detect aquatic toxicity and bioaccumulation
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435, USA
    Environ Pollut 134:133-44. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint An in situ toxicity identification evaluation method Part II: Field validation
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 23:2851-5. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Desorption kinetics of fluoranthene and trifluralin from Lake Huron and Lake Erie, USA, sediments
    Marc S Greenberg
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 24:31-9. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Isonychia spp. and macroinvertebrate community responses to stressors in streams utilizing the benthic in situ toxicity identification evaluation (BiTIE) method
    Kevin W Custer
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 127 Allyn Hall, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH 45435, USA
    Environ Pollut 151:101-9. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Investigating the role of desorption on the bioavailability of sediment-associated 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl in benthic invertebrates
    Matti T Leppänen
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 22:2861-71. 2003
  10. doi request reprint Short-term macroinvertebrate recruitment and sediment accumulation: a novel field chamber approach
    Jon P Kochersberger
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, Fairborn, Ohio, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 31:1098-106. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. ncbi request reprint Determining stressor presence in streams receiving urban and agricultural runoff: development of a benthic in situ toxicity identification evaluation method
    Kevin W Custer
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 25:2299-305. 2006
    ..The BiTIE method showed stressor-response relationships in both runoff and base flow events during 96-h exposures. The method appears useful for discerning stressors with indigenous species in situ...
  2. ncbi request reprint An in situ toxicity identification evaluation method Part I: Laboratory validation
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 23:2844-50. 2004
    ..The iTIE was more sensitive than the U.S. EPA TIE method, in that it detected toxicity more readily due to the greater loss of contaminant concentrations in the TIE manipulation process...
  3. ncbi request reprint Characterizing sediment acid volatile sulfide concentrations in European streams
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:1-12. 2007
    ..The general relationship between AVS levels and sediment characteristics provides some predictive capability for wadeable streams in the European ecoregions...
  4. ncbi request reprint Field validation of sediment zinc toxicity
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 24:541-53. 2005
    ..32 and 9.73. The no-observed-effect level appeared to be near a SEM to AVS ratio of 2, with slight to no effects between ratios of 2.34 and 2.94. No sites with ratios of less than 2 showed any adverse effects...
  5. ncbi request reprint In situ exposures using caged organisms: a multi-compartment approach to detect aquatic toxicity and bioaccumulation
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435, USA
    Environ Pollut 134:133-44. 2005
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint An in situ toxicity identification evaluation method Part II: Field validation
    G Allen Burton
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 23:2851-5. 2004
    ..The results of these studies suggest that the iTIE method provides a more accurate and sensitive evaluation of pore water toxicity than the laboratory TIE method...
  7. ncbi request reprint Desorption kinetics of fluoranthene and trifluralin from Lake Huron and Lake Erie, USA, sediments
    Marc S Greenberg
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 24:31-9. 2005
    ..Based on the rapidly desorbing fractions, the bioavailable amounts of the contaminants were predicted to be between 31 to 55% of bulk sediment concentrations...
  8. ncbi request reprint Isonychia spp. and macroinvertebrate community responses to stressors in streams utilizing the benthic in situ toxicity identification evaluation (BiTIE) method
    Kevin W Custer
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 127 Allyn Hall, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH 45435, USA
    Environ Pollut 151:101-9. 2008
    ..The BiTIE chamber system demonstrated stressor-response relationships using sublethal and multimetric endpoints...
  9. ncbi request reprint Investigating the role of desorption on the bioavailability of sediment-associated 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl in benthic invertebrates
    Matti T Leppänen
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 22:2861-71. 2003
    ..Therefore, desorbing fractions determined by Tenax extraction overestimated the bioavailable fractions in sediments...
  10. doi request reprint Short-term macroinvertebrate recruitment and sediment accumulation: a novel field chamber approach
    Jon P Kochersberger
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, Fairborn, Ohio, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 31:1098-106. 2012
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Quantitative lines of evidence for screening-level diagnostic assessment of regional fish community impacts: a comparison of spatial database evaluation methods
    Katherine E Kapo
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 42:9412-8. 2008
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Measurements of acid volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted metals are irreproducible among laboratories
    Chad R Hammerschmidt
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 29:1453-6. 2010
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Effects of suspended solids and dissolved organic carbon on nickel toxicity
    Christina E Cloran
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 29:1781-7. 2010
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Optimizing interpretation of in situ effects of riverine pollutants: impact of upwelling and downwelling
    Marc S Greenberg
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Biomedical Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 21:289-97. 2002
    ..Hydrologic and chemistry data from nested minipiezometers improved the interpretation of exposure-effects relationships...
  15. ncbi request reprint Applying adult emergence as an endpoint in a post-exposure laboratory test using two midge species (Diptera: Chironomidae)
    Matti T Leppänen
    Institute of Environmental Quality, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, OH 45435, USA
    Chemosphere 64:1667-74. 2006
    ..tentans in all treatments, otherwise the species responded similarly. C. riparius may be a better alternative for the chronic in situ exposures because of shorter exposure times and reduced feeding requirements...
  16. ncbi request reprint A geographic information systems-based, weights-of-evidence approach for diagnosing aquatic ecosystem impairment
    Katherine E Kapo
    Institute for Environmental Quality, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 25:2237-49. 2006
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Laboratory and field validation of multiple molecular biomarkers of contaminant exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)
    J Scott McClain
    Center for Environmental Toxicology and Statistics, Department of Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 22:361-70. 2003
    ..Multiple molecular biomarkers provided a sensitive, physiologically based method of determining contaminant presence and bioavailability to aquatic organisms...
  18. ncbi request reprint Effect of 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl on the reworking behavior of Lumbriculus variegatus exposed to contaminated sediment
    Peter F Landrum
    Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA GLERL, 2205 Commonwealth Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 23:178-86. 2004
    ..The DCC site contained a higher proportion of coarse material and a lower organic carbon concentration. The difference in sediment characteristics was assumed to be responsible for differences in the Wb...
  19. ncbi request reprint Comparing behavioral and chronic endpoints to evaluate the response of Lumbriculus variegatus to 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl sediment exposures
    Peter F Landrum
    Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA GLERL, 2205 Commonwealth Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 23:187-94. 2004
    ..Like the stable isotope measure, no dose response was found among TCBP treatments at 22 degrees C. The reduction in carbon assimilation rate tracked the reduction in reproduction with lower temperature...
  20. ncbi request reprint Gene expression in caged fish as a first-tier indicator of contaminant exposure in streams
    Aaron P Roberts
    Center for Environmental Toxicology and Statistics, Department of Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 24:3092-8. 2005
    ..These findings support the use of a biomarker-based approach to exposure identification and assessment...
  21. ncbi request reprint Summary and recommendations from a SETAC Pellston Workshop on in situ measures of ecological effects
    Donald J Baird
    National Water Research Institute Environment Canada at Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, PO Box 45111, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 6E1, Canada
    Integr Environ Assess Manag 3:275-8. 2007
    ..Major outcomes from group discussions are highlighted, and future priorities for research in this area are recommended...
  22. ncbi request reprint Review of aquatic in situ approaches for stressor and effect diagnosis
    Mark Crane
    Watts and Crane Associates, 23 London Street, Faringdon, Oxfordshire SN7 7AG, United Kingdom
    Integr Environ Assess Manag 3:234-45. 2007
    ..A decision tree is provided to assist decision makers in determining when in situ approaches can add value...
  23. ncbi request reprint Interlaboratory evaluation of Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans short-term and long-term sediment toxicity tests
    Teresa J Norberg-King
    U S Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Boulevard, Duluth, Minnesota 55804, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 25:2662-74. 2006
    ..Overall, the interlaboratory evaluation showed good precision of the methods, appropriate endpoints were incorporated into the test protocols, and tests effectively predicted the toxicity of sediments...
  24. ncbi request reprint Field-based effects measures
    Lorraine Maltby
    Environ Toxicol Chem 25:2261-2. 2006
  25. doi request reprint Enhancing the ecological risk assessment process
    Virginia H Dale
    Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 6036, USA
    Integr Environ Assess Manag 4:306-13. 2008
    ..In addition, tools for cumulative risk assessment should be developed because contaminants are often released into stressed environments...
  26. ncbi request reprint Analysis of algorithms predicting blood:air and tissue:blood partition coefficients from solvent partition coefficients for prevalent components of JP-8 jet fuel
    Teresa R Sterner
    Operational Technologies Corp, Bldg 837, 2729 R Street Wright Patterson, AFB, Ohio 45433, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health A 69:1441-79. 2006
    ..If calculated PC values must be used in models, a comparison of experimental and predicted PCs for chemically similar compounds would estimate the expected error level in calculated values...