Thaddeus S Stappenbeck

Summary

Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Crohn disease: a current perspective on genetics, autophagy and immunity
    Thaddeus S Stappenbeck
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Autophagy 7:355-74. 2011
  2. pmc Virus-plus-susceptibility gene interaction determines Crohn's disease gene Atg16L1 phenotypes in intestine
    Ken Cadwell
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Cell 141:1135-45. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Autophagy proteins control goblet cell function by potentiating reactive oxygen species production
    Khushbu K Patel
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    EMBO J 32:3130-44. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Genetic variants synthesize to produce paneth cell phenotypes that define subtypes of Crohn's disease
    Kelli L VanDussen
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
    Gastroenterology 146:200-9. 2014
  5. pmc A common role for Atg16L1, Atg5 and Atg7 in small intestinal Paneth cells and Crohn disease
    Ken Cadwell
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Autophagy 5:250-2. 2009
  6. pmc Notch2-dependent classical dendritic cells orchestrate intestinal immunity to attaching-and-effacing bacterial pathogens
    Ansuman T Satpathy
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Nat Immunol 14:937-48. 2013
  7. pmc Adaptive immunity restricts replication of novel murine astroviruses
    Christine C Yokoyama
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    J Virol 86:12262-70. 2012
  8. pmc Igf2bp1 is required for full induction of Ptgs2 mRNA in colonic mesenchymal stem cells in mice
    Nicholas A Manieri
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Gastroenterology 143:110-21.e10. 2012
  9. doi request reprint Host genetic susceptibility, dysbiosis, and viral triggers in inflammatory bowel disease
    Lulu Sun
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Curr Opin Gastroenterol 27:321-7. 2011
  10. pmc Autophagy and intestinal homeostasis
    Khushbu K Patel
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Annu Rev Physiol 75:241-62. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications43

  1. pmc Crohn disease: a current perspective on genetics, autophagy and immunity
    Thaddeus S Stappenbeck
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Autophagy 7:355-74. 2011
    ....
  2. pmc Virus-plus-susceptibility gene interaction determines Crohn's disease gene Atg16L1 phenotypes in intestine
    Ken Cadwell
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Cell 141:1135-45. 2010
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Autophagy proteins control goblet cell function by potentiating reactive oxygen species production
    Khushbu K Patel
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    EMBO J 32:3130-44. 2013
    ..These findings provide a novel mechanism by which autophagy proteins can control secretion. ..
  4. doi request reprint Genetic variants synthesize to produce paneth cell phenotypes that define subtypes of Crohn's disease
    Kelli L VanDussen
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
    Gastroenterology 146:200-9. 2014
    ..We investigated whether specific phenotypes of Paneth cells associated with particular genetic susceptibility loci can be used to define specific subtypes of CD...
  5. pmc A common role for Atg16L1, Atg5 and Atg7 in small intestinal Paneth cells and Crohn disease
    Ken Cadwell
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Autophagy 5:250-2. 2009
    ..Thus, one role for the autophagy pathway in CD pathogenesis is through selective effects on the biology and specialized properties of Paneth cells...
  6. pmc Notch2-dependent classical dendritic cells orchestrate intestinal immunity to attaching-and-effacing bacterial pathogens
    Ansuman T Satpathy
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Nat Immunol 14:937-48. 2013
    ..rodentium, but CD103(+) cDCs dependent on the transcription factor Batf3 were not. Our results demonstrate a nonredundant function for CD11b(+) cDCs in the response to pathogens in vivo. ..
  7. pmc Adaptive immunity restricts replication of novel murine astroviruses
    Christine C Yokoyama
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    J Virol 86:12262-70. 2012
    ....
  8. pmc Igf2bp1 is required for full induction of Ptgs2 mRNA in colonic mesenchymal stem cells in mice
    Nicholas A Manieri
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Gastroenterology 143:110-21.e10. 2012
    ..Its expression is regulated, in part, by messenger RNA (mRNA)-binding proteins that control the stability of Ptgs2 mRNA. We used a precise system of colonic injury and repair to identify Ptgs2 mRNA-binding proteins...
  9. doi request reprint Host genetic susceptibility, dysbiosis, and viral triggers in inflammatory bowel disease
    Lulu Sun
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Curr Opin Gastroenterol 27:321-7. 2011
    ..This review discusses some of the recent discoveries in host susceptibility and interaction with the microbial environment, and pinpoints key areas for advancement in our understanding of IBD pathogenesis...
  10. pmc Autophagy and intestinal homeostasis
    Khushbu K Patel
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Annu Rev Physiol 75:241-62. 2013
    ..Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the components of this pathway and their influence on inflammation, immunity, and barrier function will facilitate our understanding of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract...
  11. pmc Wnt5a potentiates TGF-β signaling to promote colonic crypt regeneration after tissue injury
    Hiroyuki Miyoshi
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Science 338:108-13. 2012
    ..Surprisingly, the effects of Wnt5a were mediated by activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. These findings suggest a Wnt5a-dependent mechanism for forming new crypt units to reestablish homeostasis...
  12. doi request reprint NOD2 status and human ileal gene expression
    Christina M Hamm
    Division of Gastroenterology, Washington University, St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Inflamm Bowel Dis 16:1649-57. 2010
    ..NOD2 single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with increased risk of ileal Crohn's disease (CD). This exploratory study was conducted to compare ileal mucosal gene expression in CD patients with and without NOD2 risk alleles...
  13. doi request reprint Role of autophagy and autophagy genes in inflammatory bowel disease
    Ken Cadwell
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 335:141-67. 2009
    ....
  14. doi request reprint The role of stromal stem cells in tissue regeneration and wound repair
    Thaddeus S Stappenbeck
    Departments of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Science 324:1666-9. 2009
    ..In mammalian wounds, stromal stem cells appear to be positioned to perform functions similar to those of blastemal cells, including communication with both the overlying epithelium and the inflammatory cells in the mesenchyme...
  15. ncbi request reprint Response from Jeffrey I. Gordon et al.: Commensal bacteria make a difference
    Jeffrey I Gordon
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Trends Microbiol 11:150-1. 2003
    ....
  16. pmc Deletion of p38-alpha mitogen-activated protein kinase within the intestinal epithelium promotes colon tumorigenesis
    Derek Wakeman
    Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Surgery 152:286-93. 2012
    ..Therefore, we sought to test the hypothesis that intestinal disruption of p38-MAPK would lead to increased tumorigenesis in the colon...
  17. pmc Peripheral education of the immune system by colonic commensal microbiota
    Stephanie K Lathrop
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Nature 478:250-4. 2011
    ....
  18. pmc Peripheral CD103+ dendritic cells form a unified subset developmentally related to CD8alpha+ conventional dendritic cells
    Brian T Edelson
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    J Exp Med 207:823-36. 2010
    ..These data provide evidence for a developmental relationship between lymphoid organ-resident CD8alpha+ cDCs and nonlymphoid CD103+ DCs...
  19. pmc Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with expansion of the enteric virome
    Scott A Handley
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Cell 151:253-66. 2012
    ..Thus, enteric viral infections may contribute to AIDS enteropathy and disease progression. These findings underline the importance of metagenomic analysis of the virome for understanding AIDS pathogenesis...
  20. pmc Viral interactions with the host and microbiota in the intestine
    Clara Moon
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, United States
    Curr Opin Immunol 24:405-10. 2012
    ..Lastly, our understanding of virally induced phenotypes has expanded through new studies that show bacteria can play an important role in the outcome of viral infection in the intestine...
  21. pmc Diversity of the autochthonous colonic microbiota
    Gerardo M Nava
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Gut Microbes 2:99-104. 2011
    ..We propose that that examination of the mucosa-associated microbes in wild type and genetically modified mice will be a valuable component to define host microbial interactions that are essential for homeostasis. ..
  22. pmc Commensal Bacteroides species induce colitis in host-genotype-specific fashion in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease
    Seth M Bloom
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 9:390-403. 2011
    ..These findings establish important experimental criteria and a conceptual framework for understanding microbial contributions to IBD...
  23. pmc Growth factor regulation of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2) expression in colonic mesenchymal stem cells
    Monica R Walker
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:5026-39. 2010
    ..These studies suggest that Fgf9 is an important factor in the regulation of Ptgs2 in colonic MSCs and may be a factor involved in its constitutive expression in vivo...
  24. pmc A key role for autophagy and the autophagy gene Atg16l1 in mouse and human intestinal Paneth cells
    Ken Cadwell
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Nature 456:259-63. 2008
    ..Thus, ATG16L1, and probably the process of autophagy, have a role within the intestinal epithelium of mice and Crohn's disease patients by selective effects on the cell biology and specialized regulatory properties of Paneth cells...
  25. pmc Efficient colonic mucosal wound repair requires Trem2 signaling
    Hiroshi Seno
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:256-61. 2009
    ..These studies show that Trem2 signaling is an important pathway to promote healing of wounds in the colon where stem cell replacement is necessary...
  26. doi request reprint In vitro expansion and genetic modification of gastrointestinal stem cells in spheroid culture
    Hiroyuki Miyoshi
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Nat Protoc 8:2471-82. 2013
    ..Isolation of epithelial cell units from mice takes up to 2 h, and stem cell-enriched gastrointestinal spheroids are obtained within 3 d. Genetically modified spheroids with lentiviruses can be obtained in 2 weeks. ..
  27. pmc Long-term IL-33-producing epithelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive lung disease
    Derek E Byers
    Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    J Clin Invest 123:3967-82. 2013
    ..Together, these findings provide a paradigm for the role of the innate immune system in chronic disease based on the influence of long-term epithelial progenitor cells programmed for excess IL-33 production. ..
  28. doi request reprint The Young and the Wnt-less: Transplantable Fetal Intestinal Spheroids without Wnts
    Hiroyuki Miyoshi
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Cell Stem Cell 13:637-8. 2013
    ..Fordham et al. (2013) and Mustata et al. (2013) report a potential source of transplantable epithelial cells from fetal gut that can convert into adult intestinal stem and differentiated cells. ..
  29. doi request reprint Mesenchymal stem cell therapy of intestinal disease: are their effects systemic or localized?
    Nicholas A Manieri
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Curr Opin Gastroenterol 27:119-24. 2011
    ..We will review recent literature regarding mesenchymal stem cells, which have been utilized in preclinical models and are now headed for clinical trials in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel disease...
  30. pmc Activated macrophages are an adaptive element of the colonic epithelial progenitor niche necessary for regenerative responses to injury
    Sarah L Pull
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:99-104. 2005
    ....
  31. pmc Developmental regulation of intestinal angiogenesis by indigenous microbes via Paneth cells
    Thaddeus S Stappenbeck
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:15451-5. 2002
    ....
  32. pmc Fgf9 signaling regulates small intestinal elongation and mesenchymal development
    Michael J Geske
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Development 135:2959-68. 2008
    ..Taken together, the interaction of FGF and TGFbeta signaling pathways in the intestinal mesenchyme could represent novel targets for future short bowel syndrome therapies...
  33. ncbi request reprint Molecular characterization of mouse gastric zymogenic cells
    Jason C Mills
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:46138-45. 2003
    ..01). These results support an emerging theme that angiogenesis in the adult mouse gut is modulated by cross-talk between its epithelial lineages and the underlying mesenchyme...
  34. doi request reprint Deciphering the 'black box' of the intestinal stem cell niche: taking direction from other systems
    Monica R Walker
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Curr Opin Gastroenterol 24:115-20. 2008
    ..The cellular origin of these signals, however, remains poorly defined. Here, we examine the current state of knowledge regarding intestinal epithelial progenitor niches and highlight applicable lessons learned from other systems...
  35. pmc Response of small intestinal epithelial cells to acute disruption of cell division through CDC25 deletion
    Gwanghee Lee
    Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:4701-6. 2009
    ..These findings have implications for the development of novel, less cytotoxic cancer chemotherapeutic drugs that specifically target the cell cycle...
  36. pmc Molecular characterization of mouse gastric epithelial progenitor cells
    Jason C Mills
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:14819-24. 2002
    ..g., Y14, staufen, mago nashi) needed for axis formation during oogenesis. mRNA targeting proteins may help these epithelial progenitors establish differential communications with neighboring cells in their niche...
  37. pmc Molecular features of adult mouse small intestinal epithelial progenitors
    Thaddeus S Stappenbeck
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1004-9. 2003
    ..This dataset, together with our recent analysis of gene expression in the gastric stem cell niche, discloses a set of molecular features shared by adult mouse gut epithelial progenitors...
  38. pmc Laminin alpha 5 influences the architecture of the mouse small intestine mucosa
    Zhen X Mahoney
    Department of Internal Medicine Renal Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    J Cell Sci 121:2493-502. 2008
    ..Our results suggest that laminin alpha 5 has a crucial role in establishing and maintaining the specific mucosal pattern of the mouse small intestine...
  39. pmc Reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal FGF signaling is required for cecal development
    Xiuqin Zhang
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Development 133:173-80. 2006
    ..Thus, these data add to our understanding of FGF-mediated reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal signaling...
  40. ncbi request reprint The maturation of mucus-secreting gastric epithelial progenitors into digestive-enzyme secreting zymogenic cells requires Mist1
    Victoria G Ramsey
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Development 134:211-22. 2007
    ..Thus, we present an in vivo system for analysis of ZC differentiation, present molecular evidence that ZCs differentiate from neck cell progenitors and identify Mist1 as the first gene with a role in this clinically important process...
  41. pmc Diverse adult stem cells share specific higher-order patterns of gene expression
    Jason M Doherty
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Box 8118, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Stem Cells 26:2124-30. 2008
    ..g., that of transit-amplifying cells) and, potentially, any biological state that is reflected in changes in global gene expression patterns. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article...
  42. pmc Myd88-dependent positioning of Ptgs2-expressing stromal cells maintains colonic epithelial proliferation during injury
    Sarah L Brown
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    J Clin Invest 117:258-69. 2007
    ....
  43. pmc Vav proteins are necessary for correct differentiation of mouse cecal and colonic enterocytes
    John Y Liu
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    J Cell Sci 122:324-34. 2009
    ..These studies show that Vav proteins are required for enterocytic differentiation and colonic epithelial barrier integrity...