R M Kennedy

Summary

Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi A randomized comparison of nitrous oxide plus hematoma block versus ketamine plus midazolam for emergency department forearm fracture reduction in children
    Jan D Luhmann
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, One Children s Place, Suite 4S50, Campus Box 8116, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Pediatrics 118:e1078-86. 2006
  2. ncbi Pharmacological management of pain and anxiety during emergency procedures in children
    R M Kennedy
    Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis Children s Hospital, Missouri, USA
    Paediatr Drugs 3:337-54. 2001
  3. ncbi Emergency department management of pain and anxiety related to orthopedic fracture care: a guide to analgesic techniques and procedural sedation in children
    Robert M Kennedy
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, St Louis Children s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110 1077, USA
    Paediatr Drugs 6:11-31. 2004
  4. doi Clinical implications of unmanaged needle-insertion pain and distress in children
    Robert M Kennedy
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Pediatrics 122:S130-3. 2008
  5. ncbi Continuous-flow delivery of nitrous oxide and oxygen: a safe and cost-effective technique for inhalation analgesia and sedation of pediatric patients
    J D Luhmann
    Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis Children s Hospital, Missouri 63110 1077, USA
    Pediatr Emerg Care 15:388-92. 1999
  6. ncbi A randomized clinical trial of continuous-flow nitrous oxide and midazolam for sedation of young children during laceration repair
    J D Luhmann
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, and St Louis Children s Hospital, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Ann Emerg Med 37:20-7. 2001
  7. doi Oxycodone versus codeine for triage pain in children with suspected forearm fracture: a randomized controlled trial
    Rachel L Charney
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Pediatr Emerg Care 24:595-600. 2008
  8. ncbi Sedation for peritonsillar abscess drainage in the pediatric emergency department
    Jan D Luhmann
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine and St Louis Children s Hospital, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Pediatr Emerg Care 18:1-3. 2002
  9. doi Clinical policy: Critical issues in the sedation of pediatric patients in the emergency department
    Sharon E Mace
    Ann Emerg Med 51:378-99, 399.e1-57. 2008
  10. ncbi Clinical policy: evidence-based approach to pharmacologic agents used in pediatric sedation and analgesia in the emergency department
    Sharon E Mace
    J Pediatr Surg 39:1472-84. 2004

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. ncbi A randomized comparison of nitrous oxide plus hematoma block versus ketamine plus midazolam for emergency department forearm fracture reduction in children
    Jan D Luhmann
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, One Children s Place, Suite 4S50, Campus Box 8116, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Pediatrics 118:e1078-86. 2006
    ..We compared the efficacy and adverse effects of ketamine/midazolam to those of nitrous oxide/hematoma block for analgesia and anxiolysis during forearm fracture reduction in children...
  2. ncbi Pharmacological management of pain and anxiety during emergency procedures in children
    R M Kennedy
    Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis Children s Hospital, Missouri, USA
    Paediatr Drugs 3:337-54. 2001
    ..Alternatively, when intensely painful fracture reduction, burn debridement, or abscess drainage is necessary, well tolerated and effective deep sedation can be achieved with careful use of midazolam and either ketamine or fentanyl...
  3. ncbi Emergency department management of pain and anxiety related to orthopedic fracture care: a guide to analgesic techniques and procedural sedation in children
    Robert M Kennedy
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, St Louis Children s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110 1077, USA
    Paediatr Drugs 6:11-31. 2004
    ..A combination of local anesthesia with moderate sedation, for example nitrous oxide, is another attractive option...
  4. doi Clinical implications of unmanaged needle-insertion pain and distress in children
    Robert M Kennedy
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Pediatrics 122:S130-3. 2008
    ..This review summarizes the evidence for the importance of managing pediatric procedural pain and methods for reducing venous access pain...
  5. ncbi Continuous-flow delivery of nitrous oxide and oxygen: a safe and cost-effective technique for inhalation analgesia and sedation of pediatric patients
    J D Luhmann
    Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis Children s Hospital, Missouri 63110 1077, USA
    Pediatr Emerg Care 15:388-92. 1999
    ..The following is a description of the components, assembly, and use of a continuous-flow machine that safely and inexpensively delivers N2O and O2 to children...
  6. ncbi A randomized clinical trial of continuous-flow nitrous oxide and midazolam for sedation of young children during laceration repair
    J D Luhmann
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, and St Louis Children s Hospital, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Ann Emerg Med 37:20-7. 2001
    ..To compare the efficacy and complication profile of oral midazolam therapy and continuous-flow 50% nitrous oxide in alleviating anxiety during laceration repair in children 2 to 6 years old...
  7. doi Oxycodone versus codeine for triage pain in children with suspected forearm fracture: a randomized controlled trial
    Rachel L Charney
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Pediatr Emerg Care 24:595-600. 2008
    ..To compare the efficacy of pain reduction of triage oxycodone (O) versus codeine (C) to children with suspected forearm fractures...
  8. ncbi Sedation for peritonsillar abscess drainage in the pediatric emergency department
    Jan D Luhmann
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine and St Louis Children s Hospital, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Pediatr Emerg Care 18:1-3. 2002
    ..To evaluate the use of intravenous (IV) sedation in children during peritonsillar abscess (PTA) incision and drainage in the emergency department (ED)...
  9. doi Clinical policy: Critical issues in the sedation of pediatric patients in the emergency department
    Sharon E Mace
    Ann Emerg Med 51:378-99, 399.e1-57. 2008
  10. ncbi Clinical policy: evidence-based approach to pharmacologic agents used in pediatric sedation and analgesia in the emergency department
    Sharon E Mace
    J Pediatr Surg 39:1472-84. 2004
  11. ncbi Clinical policy: evidence-based approach to pharmacologic agents used in pediatric sedation and analgesia in the emergency department
    Sharon E Mace
    Ann Emerg Med 44:342-77. 2004
  12. ncbi Clinical policy: evidence-based approach to pharmacologic agents used in pediatric sedation and analgesia in the emergency department
    Sharon E Mace
    J Emerg Nurs 30:447-61. 2004
  13. doi On the front lines: lessons learned in implementing multidisciplinary peripheral venous access pain-management programs in pediatric hospitals
    Sarah Leahy
    Center for Pain Relief, Children s Healthcare of Atlanta, 1124 Mayfield Dr, Decatur, GA 30033, USA
    Pediatrics 122:S161-70. 2008
    ..Implementation of these strategies can result in significant improvements in the pediatric venous access experience...