M Johnston

Summary

Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Glucose as a hormone: receptor-mediated glucose sensing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    M Johnston
    Department of Genetics, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Biochem Soc Trans 33:247-52. 2005
  2. pmc Characterization of three related glucose repressors and genes they regulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    L L Lutfiyya
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Genetics 150:1377-91. 1998
  3. ncbi The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XII
    M Johnston
    The Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Nature 387:87-90. 1997
  4. ncbi Feasting, fasting and fermenting. Glucose sensing in yeast and other cells
    M Johnston
    Department of Genetics, Washington University Medical School, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Trends Genet 15:29-33. 1999
  5. ncbi The yeast genome: on the road to the Golden Age
    M Johnston
    Department of Genetics, Box 8232, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 Euclid Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63113, USA
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 10:617-23. 2000
  6. pmc Two different repressors collaborate to restrict expression of the yeast glucose transporter genes HXT2 and HXT4 to low levels of glucose
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 16:5536-45. 1996
  7. pmc Rgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key regulator of glucose-induced genes, is both an activator and a repressor of transcription
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 16:6419-26. 1996
  8. pmc Glucose sensing and signaling by two glucose receptors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    EMBO J 17:2566-73. 1998
  9. ncbi Identification of the DNA binding site for NGFI-B by genetic selection in yeast
    T E Wilson
    Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110
    Science 252:1296-300. 1991
  10. ncbi The nuclear exportin Msn5 is required for nuclear export of the Mig1 glucose repressor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    M J DeVit
    Department of Genetics, Box 8232, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Curr Biol 9:1231-41. 1999

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. ncbi Glucose as a hormone: receptor-mediated glucose sensing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    M Johnston
    Department of Genetics, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Biochem Soc Trans 33:247-52. 2005
    ....
  2. pmc Characterization of three related glucose repressors and genes they regulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    L L Lutfiyya
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Genetics 150:1377-91. 1998
    ..We found no genes repressed by Yer028. Also, we identified no genes repressed by only Mig1 or Mig2. Thus, Mig1 and Mig2 are redundant glucose repressors of many genes...
  3. ncbi The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XII
    M Johnston
    The Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Nature 387:87-90. 1997
    ..All of the genes of this simple eukaryotic cell have recently been revealed by an international collaborative effort to determine the complete DNA sequence of its nuclear genome. Here we describe some of the features of chromosome XII...
  4. ncbi Feasting, fasting and fermenting. Glucose sensing in yeast and other cells
    M Johnston
    Department of Genetics, Washington University Medical School, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Trends Genet 15:29-33. 1999
    ..What we have learned about these glucose sensing and signaling mechanisms might shed light on how other cells sense and respond to glucose...
  5. ncbi The yeast genome: on the road to the Golden Age
    M Johnston
    Department of Genetics, Box 8232, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 Euclid Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63113, USA
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 10:617-23. 2000
    ..When this is accomplished, we will have entered a Golden Age, when we will have the information necessary for designing truly incisive experiments to reveal biological function...
  6. pmc Two different repressors collaborate to restrict expression of the yeast glucose transporter genes HXT2 and HXT4 to low levels of glucose
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 16:5536-45. 1996
    ..This transcriptional regulation is physiologically very important to the yeast cell because it causes these glucose transporters to be expressed only in low-glucose media, in which they are required for growth...
  7. pmc Rgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key regulator of glucose-induced genes, is both an activator and a repressor of transcription
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 16:6419-26. 1996
    ..Thus, signals generated by two different glucose sensors act through Grr1p to determine Rgt1p function...
  8. pmc Glucose sensing and signaling by two glucose receptors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    EMBO J 17:2566-73. 1998
    ..These results support the idea that yeast senses glucose using two modified glucose transporters that serve as glucose receptors...
  9. ncbi Identification of the DNA binding site for NGFI-B by genetic selection in yeast
    T E Wilson
    Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110
    Science 252:1296-300. 1991
    ..Cotransfection experiments in mammalian cells demonstrated that NGFI-B can activate transcription from the NBRE with or without its putative ligand binding domain...
  10. ncbi The nuclear exportin Msn5 is required for nuclear export of the Mig1 glucose repressor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    M J DeVit
    Department of Genetics, Box 8232, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Curr Biol 9:1231-41. 1999
    ..Phosphorylation alters the subcellular localization of Mig1, causing it to be nuclear when glucose is present, and cytoplasmic when glucose is absent...
  11. pmc Genetic and molecular characterization of GAL83: its interaction and similarities with other genes involved in glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    J R Erickson
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110
    Genetics 135:655-64. 1993
    ..Such unlinked noncomplementation suggests that Gal83p, Gal82p and Reg1p may interact with one another. Possible roles for GAL83, GAL82 and REG1 are discussed in relation to SNF1, SIP1 and SIP2...
  12. pmc Grr1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is connected to the ubiquitin proteolysis machinery through Skp1: coupling glucose sensing to gene expression and the cell cycle
    F N Li
    Department of Genetics, Box 8232, Washington University, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    EMBO J 16:5629-38. 1997
    ..The Grr1-Skp1 interaction is enhanced by high levels of glucose. This could provide yeast with a mechanism for coupling nutrient availability to gene expression and cell cycle regulation...
  13. pmc Regulated nuclear translocation of the Mig1 glucose repressor
    M J De Vit
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 8:1603-18. 1997
    ..Our results suggest that a glucose-regulated nuclear import and/or export mechanism controls the activity of Mig1...
  14. pmc Two zinc-finger-containing repressors are responsible for glucose repression of SUC2 expression
    L L Lutfiyya
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 16:4790-7. 1996
    ..This could explain our observation that MIG2 appears to have little role in glucose repression of other promoters with MIG1-binding sites...
  15. pmc Three different regulatory mechanisms enable yeast hexose transporter (HXT) genes to be induced by different levels of glucose
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110
    Mol Cell Biol 15:1564-72. 1995
    ..Thus, the glucose repression and glucose induction mechanisms share some of the same components and may share the same primary signal generated from glucose...
  16. pmc GRR1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for glucose repression and encodes a protein with leucine-rich repeats
    J S Flick
    Department of Genetics, Washington University Medical School, St Louis, Missouri 63110
    Mol Cell Biol 11:5101-12. 1991
    ....
  17. pmc Suppressors reveal two classes of glucose repression genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    J R Erickson
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110
    Genetics 136:1271-8. 1994
    ..We suggest that Reg1p, Gal82p and Gal83p act after the step(s) executed by Grr1p, possibly transmitting the signal for repression to the Snf1p protein kinase...
  18. ncbi Surveying Saccharomyces genomes to identify functional elements by comparative DNA sequence analysis
    P F Cliften
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Genome Res 11:1175-86. 2001
    ..Our results lead us to conclude that comparative DNA sequence analysis will enable identification of functionally conserved elements within the yeast genome, and suggest a path for obtaining this information...
  19. pmc COMPASS: a complex of proteins associated with a trithorax-related SET domain protein
    T Miller
    Department of Biochemistry, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63104, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:12902-7. 2001
    ..Molecular characterization of trithorax complexes will facilitate defining the role of this class of proteins in the regulation of gene expression and how their misregulation results in the development of human cancer...
  20. pmc Two glucose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are glucose sensors that generate a signal for induction of gene expression
    S Ozcan
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 93:12428-32. 1996
    ..Thus, the Rgt2p and Snf3p glucose transporters appear to act as glucose receptors that generate an intracellular glucose signal, suggesting that glucose signaling in yeast is a receptor-mediated process...
  21. ncbi Isolation and characterization of the ZWF1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase
    I Nogae
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110
    Gene 96:161-9. 1990
    ..The predicted amino acid sequence of yeast G6PD is highly similar to the sequence of the Drosophila, human, and rat enzymes, except near its N terminus, where the yeast and Drosophila sequences diverge from that of human and rat...
  22. ncbi In vivo mutational analysis of the NGFI-A zinc fingers
    T E Wilson
    Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110
    J Biol Chem 267:3718-24. 1992
    ..Surprisingly, not all of the mutations tested significantly impaired NGFI-A-specific DNA binding, suggesting that the function of these zinc fingers is more diverse than previously recognized...
  23. ncbi Complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VIII
    M Johnston
    Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110
    Science 265:2077-82. 1994
    ..On average, there is one gene approximately every 2 kilobases. Although the coding density and base composition across the chromosome are not uniform, no regular pattern of variation is apparent...
  24. ncbi Erythropoietin response to anaemia is not altered by surgery or recombinant human erythropoietin therapy
    L T Goodnough
    Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Laboratory Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110
    Br J Haematol 87:695-9. 1994
    ..We conclude that preoperative recombinant human erythropoietin therapy and/or surgery do not adversely affect the postoperative erythropoietin response to anaemia...

Research Grants2

  1. "Calling Cards" for DNA-binding proteins: A tool for their genome-wide mapping
    H Johnston; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..cerevisiae, a popular organism for experimentation that provides a model for human biology and disease, and if successful, may be able to be adapted for experimentation with other organisms, including humans. ..