Michael R Bruchas

Summary

Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint New Technologies for Elucidating Opioid Receptor Function
    Michael R Bruchas
    Departments of Anesthesiology and Neuroscience, Washington University, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Electronic address
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 37:279-89. 2016
  2. pmc Selective p38α MAPK deletion in serotonergic neurons produces stress resilience in models of depression and addiction
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Neuron 71:498-511. 2011
  3. pmc Repeated swim stress induces kappa opioid-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Neuroreport 19:1417-22. 2008
  4. pmc Ligand-directed c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation disrupts opioid receptor signaling
    Erica J Melief
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:11608-13. 2010
  5. pmc Activation of the kappa opioid receptor in the dorsal raphe nucleus mediates the aversive effects of stress and reinstates drug seeking
    Benjamin B Land
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:19168-73. 2009
  6. pmc CRF1-R activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid system in the mouse basolateral amygdala mediates anxiety-like behavior
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8528. 2009
  7. pmc Optodynamic simulation of β-adrenergic receptor signalling
    Edward R Siuda
    Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Basic Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Nat Commun 6:8480. 2015
  8. pmc Stress-induced activation of the dynorphin/κ-opioid receptor system in the amygdala potentiates nicotine conditioned place preference
    Jeffrey S Smith
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 7280, USA
    J Neurosci 32:1488-95. 2012
  9. pmc The dysphoric component of stress is encoded by activation of the dynorphin kappa-opioid system
    Benjamin B Land
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 7280, USA
    J Neurosci 28:407-14. 2008
  10. pmc Spatiotemporal control of opioid signaling and behavior
    Edward R Siuda
    Department of Anesthesiology, Basic Research Division, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO 63110, USA Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neuron 86:923-35. 2015

Collaborators

  • Mei Xu
  • Megumi Aita
  • Stefan Strack
  • Christopher P Ford
  • John D Scott
  • Thomas S Hnasko
  • Catherine E Hagan
  • Sabiha K Barot
  • Chris Hague
  • Benedict J Kolber
  • Jordan G McCall
  • Edward R Siuda
  • Ream Al-Hasani
  • Charles Chavkin
  • Benjamin B Land
  • Erica J Melief
  • Raeesa P Gupte
  • William J Planer
  • Martin J Schmidt
  • Suzanne E Schindler
  • Gunchul Shin
  • William Planer
  • John A Rogers
  • Madison A Baird
  • Robert W Gereau
  • Nancy R Zhang
  • Lara W Crock
  • Jeffrey S Smith
  • Mayumi Miyatake
  • John S Lyssand
  • Cecilea C Clayton
  • Suraj Kadunganattil
  • Andrew J Shepherd
  • Ronald Merrill
  • Durga P Mohapatra
  • Sung Il Park
  • Mingjie Li
  • Aaron J Norris
  • Bryan A Copits
  • Krzystof L Hyrc
  • Chandra L Tucker
  • Samuel C Funderburk
  • Daniel Y Hong
  • Sonya L Anderson
  • Marc I Diamond
  • Jin Moo Lee
  • Ping Yan
  • Audra M Foshage
  • Xian Huang
  • Fiorenzo G Omenetto
  • Yei Hwan Jung
  • Tae Il Kim
  • Lucy Stickler
  • Hu Chen Zhao
  • Yu Qing Cao
  • Sherri K Vogt
  • Abigail G Schindler
  • Richard M Gustin
  • Emma Martinelli
  • Clinton D Morgan
  • Steven D Chang
  • Katelyn E Sadler
  • Richard G Gardner
  • Lorene K Langeberg
  • Jennifer L Whiting
  • Kyung Soon Lee
  • Marvin E Adams
  • Jennifer L Wacker
  • Michael L Lee
  • Ryan Kastl
  • Richard D Palmiter
  • William J Giardino
  • Selena Schattauer
  • Daniel Messinger
  • Julia C Lemos

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. doi request reprint New Technologies for Elucidating Opioid Receptor Function
    Michael R Bruchas
    Departments of Anesthesiology and Neuroscience, Washington University, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Electronic address
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 37:279-89. 2016
    ....
  2. pmc Selective p38α MAPK deletion in serotonergic neurons produces stress resilience in models of depression and addiction
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Neuron 71:498-511. 2011
    ..These findings suggest that stress initiates a cascade of molecular and cellular events in which p38α MAPK induces a hyposerotonergic state underlying depression-like and drug-seeking behaviors...
  3. pmc Repeated swim stress induces kappa opioid-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Neuroreport 19:1417-22. 2008
    ..These results indicate stress-induced activation of the dynorphin-KOR systems activates ERK1/2 MAPK signaling, and this may contribute to the behavioral responses to repeated stress exposure...
  4. pmc Ligand-directed c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation disrupts opioid receptor signaling
    Erica J Melief
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:11608-13. 2010
    ..These findings suggest that ligand-directed activation of JNK kinases may generally provides an alternate mode of G protein-coupled receptor regulation...
  5. pmc Activation of the kappa opioid receptor in the dorsal raphe nucleus mediates the aversive effects of stress and reinstates drug seeking
    Benjamin B Land
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:19168-73. 2009
    ..These results suggest that the adverse effects of stress may converge on the serotonergic system and offers an approach to controlling stress-induced dysphoria and relapse...
  6. pmc CRF1-R activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid system in the mouse basolateral amygdala mediates anxiety-like behavior
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8528. 2009
    ....
  7. pmc Optodynamic simulation of β-adrenergic receptor signalling
    Edward R Siuda
    Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Basic Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Nat Commun 6:8480. 2015
    ..These new GPCR approaches enhance the utility of optogenetics and allow for discrete spatiotemporal control of GPCR signalling in vitro and in vivo. ..
  8. pmc Stress-induced activation of the dynorphin/κ-opioid receptor system in the amygdala potentiates nicotine conditioned place preference
    Jeffrey S Smith
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 7280, USA
    J Neurosci 32:1488-95. 2012
    ..Together, these data implicate the amygdala as a key region modulating the appetitive properties of nicotine, and suggest that κ-opioid antagonists may be useful therapeutic tools to reduce stress-induced nicotine craving...
  9. pmc The dysphoric component of stress is encoded by activation of the dynorphin kappa-opioid system
    Benjamin B Land
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 7280, USA
    J Neurosci 28:407-14. 2008
    ..The convergence of stress-induced aversive inputs on the dynorphin system was unexpected, implicates dynorphin as a key mediator of dysphoria, and emphasizes kappa-receptor antagonists as promising therapeutics...
  10. pmc Spatiotemporal control of opioid signaling and behavior
    Edward R Siuda
    Department of Anesthesiology, Basic Research Division, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO 63110, USA Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neuron 86:923-35. 2015
    ..This tool has generalizable application for spatiotemporal control of opioid signaling and, furthermore, can be used broadly for mimicking endogenous neuronal inhibition pathways. ..
  11. pmc CRH Engagement of the Locus Coeruleus Noradrenergic System Mediates Stress-Induced Anxiety
    Jordan G McCall
    Division of Basic Research, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neuron 87:605-20. 2015
    ..These studies position the LC-NE system as a critical mediator of acute stress-induced anxiety and offer a potential intervention for preventing stress-related affective disorders. ..
  12. pmc Kinase cascades and ligand-directed signaling at the kappa opioid receptor
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 210:137-47. 2010
    ..Stress-induced activation of dynorphin-KOR is well known to produce analgesia, and more recently, it has been implicated as a mediator of stress-induced responses including anxiety, depression, and reinstatement of drug seeking...
  13. pmc Phosphorylation of the mu-opioid receptor at tyrosine 166 (Tyr3.51) in the DRY motif reduces agonist efficacy
    Cecilea C Clayton
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195 7280, USA
    Mol Pharmacol 77:339-47. 2010
    ....
  14. pmc Serine 363 is required for nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid receptor (NOPR) desensitization, internalization, and arrestin signaling
    Nancy R Zhang
    Department of Anesthesiology, Basic Research Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    J Biol Chem 287:42019-30. 2012
    ..These findings suggest that NOPR function may be regulated by GRK3 phosphorylation of Ser-363 and Arrestin3 and further demonstrates the complex nature of G-protein-dependent and -independent signaling in opioid receptors...
  15. pmc Locus coeruleus kappa-opioid receptors modulate reinstatement of cocaine place preference through a noradrenergic mechanism
    Ream Al-Hasani
    1 Basic Research Division, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA 2 Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 38:2484-97. 2013
    ..These results identify a previously unknown interaction between KORs and NA systems and suggest a NA regulation of KOR-dependent reinstatement of cocaine CPP...
  16. pmc Fabrication and application of flexible, multimodal light-emitting devices for wireless optogenetics
    Jordan G McCall
    1 Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Basic Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA 2 Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA 3 Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA 4 Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA 5
    Nat Protoc 8:2413-28. 2013
    ....
  17. pmc Stress-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation mediates kappa-opioid-dependent dysphoria
    Michael R Bruchas
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 7280, USA
    J Neurosci 27:11614-23. 2007
    ..Our results indicate that activation of p38 MAPK signaling by the endogenous dynorphin-kappa-opioid system likely constitutes a key component of the molecular mechanisms mediating the aversive properties of stress...
  18. pmc Alpha-dystrobrevin-1 recruits alpha-catulin to the alpha1D-adrenergic receptor/dystrophin-associated protein complex signalosome
    John S Lyssand
    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:21854-9. 2010
    ..Taken together, our study implicates α-catulin as a unique regulator of GPCR signaling and represents a unique expansion of the intricate and continually evolving array of GPCR signaling networks...
  19. doi request reprint Photo-activatable Cre recombinase regulates gene expression in vivo
    Suzanne E Schindler
    Department of Neurology and the Hope Center for Neurological Disorders, St Louis, MO
    Sci Rep 5:13627. 2015
    ..Light activation of PA-Cre may allow permanent gene modification with improved spatiotemporal precision compared to standard methods. ..
  20. doi request reprint Convergent phosphomodulation of the major neuronal dendritic potassium channel Kv4.2 by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide
    Raeesa P Gupte
    Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Roy J and Lucile A Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neuropharmacology 101:291-308. 2016
    ..Altogether, our findings suggest a novel GPCR-channel signaling crosstalk between PACAP/PAC1 and Kv4.2 channel in a manner that could lead to neuronal hyperexcitability. ..
  21. pmc Central amygdala metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the modulation of visceral pain
    Lara W Crock
    Program in Neuroscience, Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    J Neurosci 32:14217-26. 2012
    ..Overall, these data demonstrate that mGluR5 activation leads to increased CeA output that drives bladder pain sensitization...