Clinton K Murray

Summary

Affiliation: Walter Reed Army Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Biofilm formation by clinical isolates and the implications in chronic infections
    Carlos J Sanchez
    Department of Extremity Trauma and Regenerative Medicine, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, Ft, Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 13:47. 2013
  2. pmc Antimicrobial resistance surveillance in the AFHSC-GEIS network
    William G Meyer
    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, 11800 Tech Rd, Silver Spring, MD 20904, USA
    BMC Public Health 11:S8. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Efficacy of point-of-injury combat antimicrobials
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S307-13. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Prevention of infections associated with combat-related extremity injuries
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S235-57. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Correlation of American Burn Association sepsis criteria with the presence of bacteremia in burned patients admitted to the intensive care unit
    Brian K Hogan
    The San Antonio Military Medical Center SAMMC, Texas 78234, USA
    J Burn Care Res 33:371-8. 2012
  6. doi request reprint Changes in the incidences of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant organisms isolated in a military medical center
    Edward F Keen
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 31:728-32. 2010
  7. doi request reprint Twenty-five year epidemiology of invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered at a burn center
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 35:1112-7. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Infectious complications of noncombat trauma patients provided care at a military trauma center
    Heather C Yun
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Mil Med 175:317-23. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Longitudinal characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonizing and infecting combat casualties
    Rebekah A Sensenig
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Am J Infect Control 40:183-5. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Contribution of bacterial and viral infections to attributable mortality in patients with severe burns: an autopsy series
    Laurie C D'Avignon
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 36:773-9. 2010

Detail Information

Publications107 found, 100 shown here

  1. pmc Biofilm formation by clinical isolates and the implications in chronic infections
    Carlos J Sanchez
    Department of Extremity Trauma and Regenerative Medicine, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, Ft, Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 13:47. 2013
    ..Herein, we investigated the biofilm forming capacity in a large collection of single patient infecting isolates and compared the relationship between biofilm formation to various strain characteristics...
  2. pmc Antimicrobial resistance surveillance in the AFHSC-GEIS network
    William G Meyer
    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, 11800 Tech Rd, Silver Spring, MD 20904, USA
    BMC Public Health 11:S8. 2011
    ..This section documents the accomplishments and activities of the network through AFHSC-GEIS partners in 2009...
  3. doi request reprint Efficacy of point-of-injury combat antimicrobials
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S307-13. 2011
    ..We review infectious complications and colonization rates associated with delivery of point-of-injury antimicrobial therapy...
  4. doi request reprint Prevention of infections associated with combat-related extremity injuries
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S235-57. 2011
    ..This evidence-based medicine review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma...
  5. doi request reprint Correlation of American Burn Association sepsis criteria with the presence of bacteremia in burned patients admitted to the intensive care unit
    Brian K Hogan
    The San Antonio Military Medical Center SAMMC, Texas 78234, USA
    J Burn Care Res 33:371-8. 2012
    ..638 (95% confidence interval 0.573-0.704; P < .001). Among severe burn patients, the ABA trigger for sepsis did not correlate strongly with bacteremia in this retrospective chart review...
  6. doi request reprint Changes in the incidences of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant organisms isolated in a military medical center
    Edward F Keen
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 31:728-32. 2010
    ..Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have emerged as the causes of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients...
  7. doi request reprint Twenty-five year epidemiology of invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered at a burn center
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 35:1112-7. 2009
    ..Continued active surveillance and aggressive infection control strategies are recommended to prevent the spread of community-acquired MRSA to this burn unit...
  8. ncbi request reprint Infectious complications of noncombat trauma patients provided care at a military trauma center
    Heather C Yun
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Mil Med 175:317-23. 2010
    ..In burned patients, infection was associated with total body surface area burned and preexisting conditions (p < 0.01). Enhanced infection control in targeted trauma populations may improve outcomes...
  9. doi request reprint Longitudinal characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonizing and infecting combat casualties
    Rebekah A Sensenig
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Am J Infect Control 40:183-5. 2012
    ..The same is true for serial infecting isolates recovered during hospitalization...
  10. doi request reprint Contribution of bacterial and viral infections to attributable mortality in patients with severe burns: an autopsy series
    Laurie C D'Avignon
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 36:773-9. 2010
    ..aureus remain the most common cause of bacteria related mortality early in the hospital course. Viral infections are also associated with mortality and numbers have remained stable when compared to data from prior years...
  11. doi request reprint Multidrug-resistant bacterial colonization of combat-injured personnel at admission to medical centers after evacuation from Afghanistan and Iraq
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S52-7. 2011
    ..Admission screening for MDRO colonization has been established to monitor this problem and effectiveness of responses to it...
  12. pmc Efficacy of fluoroquinolones against Leptospira interrogans in a hamster model
    Matthew E Griffith
    Infectious Disease Service, MCHE MDI, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 51:2615-7. 2007
    ..Each agent produced a statistically significant survival advantage compared to no treatment and demonstrated survival similar to that seen with doxycycline therapy...
  13. pmc Antimicrobial susceptibilities of geographically diverse clinical human isolates of Leptospira
    Roseanne A Ressner
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 52:2750-4. 2008
    ..There appears to be possible variability in susceptibility to some antimicrobial agents among strains, suggesting that more extensive testing to look for geographic variability should be pursued...
  14. doi request reprint Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in wound cultures recovered from a combat support hospital in Iraq
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 69:S102-8. 2010
    ..aureus (CA-MRSA) strains seem to produce severe disease but retain susceptibility to many oral antimicrobials. This study characterizes 84 MRSA isolates recovered from wound cultures at a combat support hospital in Iraq...
  15. ncbi request reprint Association of bacterial colonization at the time of presentation to a combat support hospital in a combat zone with subsequent 30-day colonization or infection
    Robert L Kaspar
    Department of Medicine, Darnall Army Medical Center, Fort Hood, TX, USA
    Mil Med 174:899-903. 2009
    ..Carefully obtained screening cultures immediately after injury combined with look-back monitoring supports the role of nosocomial transmission. Consistent infection control strategies are needed for the entire MHS...
  16. ncbi request reprint Efficacy of caspofungin and posaconazole in a murine model of disseminated Exophiala infection
    Robert G Rivard
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Med Mycol 45:685-9. 2007
    ..Amphotericin B and posaconazole reduced fungal burden. Posaconazole and caspofungin appear to have potential for use in treatment of this rare infection...
  17. doi request reprint Guidelines for the prevention of infections associated with combat-related injuries: 2011 update: endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Surgical Infection Society
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S210-34. 2011
    ....
  18. pmc Staphylococcus aureus colonization of healthy military service members in the United States and Afghanistan
    Todd J Vento
    Brooke Army Medical Center San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 13:325. 2013
    ..We conducted a pilot study to screen non-deployed and deployed healthy military service members for MRSA/MSSA colonization at various anatomic sites and assessed isolates for molecular differences...
  19. pmc Carbapenem susceptibility testing errors using three automated systems, disk diffusion, Etest, and broth microdilution and carbapenem resistance genes in isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex
    Ana Elizabeth Markelz
    LTC, MC, USA, Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3551 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55:4707-11. 2011
    ..8 and 30.8%. International variability in carbapenem breakpoints and the absence of CLSI breakpoints for doripenem present a challenge in susceptibility testing...
  20. doi request reprint Infectious disease complications of combat-related injuries
    Clinton K Murray
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Crit Care Med 36:S358-64. 2008
    ..These strategies allow patients to survive near-catastrophic injuries, placing a greater emphasis on the medical infrastructure to mitigate short- and long-term complications associated with these injuries...
  21. doi request reprint Outcomes of bacteremia in burn patients involved in combat operations overseas
    Roseanne A Ressner
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Am Coll Surg 206:439-44. 2008
    ..It is currently unclear if bacteremia with these multidrug-resistant organisms in OIF/OEF burn casualties is associated with increased mortality...
  22. doi request reprint Prevalence of multidrug-resistant organisms recovered at a military burn center
    Edward F Keen
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 36:819-25. 2010
    ....
  23. doi request reprint Infections complicating the care of combat casualties during operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom
    Clinton K Murray
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S62-73. 2011
    ..We examine the Joint Theater Trauma Registry (JTTR) for infections and potential risk factors, such as transfusions, among Iraq and Afghanistan trauma patients...
  24. pmc Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria colonization of healthy US military personnel in the US and Afghanistan
    Todd J Vento
    Brooke Army Medical Center San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 13:68. 2013
    ..The US military has seen steady increases in multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria (GNB) infections in casualties from Iraq and Afghanistan. This study evaluates the prevalence of MDR GNB colonization in US military personnel...
  25. doi request reprint Incidence of systemic fungal infection and related mortality following severe burns
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 34:1108-12. 2008
    ....
  26. pmc Tetracycline susceptibility testing and resistance genes in isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex from a U.S. military hospital
    Kevin S Akers
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:2693-5. 2009
    ..Susceptibilities varied significantly with the testing method. The acquired tetracycline resistance genes tetA, tetB, and tetA(39) were present in the isolates...
  27. doi request reprint Central nervous system infections in patients with severe burns
    Tatjana P Calvano
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Burns 36:688-91. 2010
    ..4-2% of all patients hospitalized with head trauma. CNS infection incidence in burn patients is unknown and this study sets out to identify the incidence and risk factors associated with CNS infections...
  28. pmc Comparison of PCR/electron spray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry versus traditional clinical microbiology for active surveillance of organisms contaminating high-use surfaces in a burn intensive care unit, an orthopedic ward and healthcare wor
    Heather C Yun
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, TX, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 12:252. 2012
    ..Understanding nosocomial pathogen transmission is restricted by culture limitations. Novel platforms, such as PCR-based electron spray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), may be useful as investigational tools...
  29. doi request reprint Infection prevention and control in deployed military medical treatment facilities
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S290-8. 2011
    ..This review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma...
  30. doi request reprint Description of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in burn patients
    Jessie S Glasser
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 36:528-32. 2010
    ..Although Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are common in the community and can cause nosocomial infections, the incidence and risk factors for pneumococcal infections in burn patients is unclear...
  31. doi request reprint Oral antibiotics for infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms
    Jessie S Glasser
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Scand J Infect Dis 43:649-51. 2011
    ..E. coli and K. pneumoniae susceptibilities increased by combining amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and cefdinir...
  32. ncbi request reprint Effect of timing and duration of azithromycin therapy of leptospirosis in a hamster model
    James E Moon
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Antimicrob Chemother 59:148-51. 2007
    ..In this study, the utility of short courses of azithromycin in treating or preventing leptospirosis was investigated in a lethal hamster model...
  33. doi request reprint Clostridium difficile infections in patients with severe burns
    Scott J Crabtree
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Burns 37:42-8. 2011
    ....
  34. doi request reprint Prevention of infections associated with combat-related central nervous system injuries
    Michael A Forgione
    Infectious Disease Service, Keesler Medical Center, Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi 39534, USA
    J Trauma 71:S258-63. 2011
    ..This evidence-based medicine review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma...
  35. doi request reprint Prevention and treatment of infected foot and ankle wounds sustained in the combat environment
    Brendan D Masini
    Brooke Army Medical Center BAMC, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Foot Ankle Clin 15:91-112. 2010
    ....
  36. doi request reprint Evaluation of potential environmental contamination sources for the presence of multidrug-resistant bacteria linked to wound infections in combat casualties
    Edward F Keen
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 33:905-11. 2012
    ..To determine whether multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative organisms are present in Afghanistan or Iraq soil samples, contaminate standard deployed hospital or modular operating rooms (ORs), or aerosolize during surgical procedures...
  37. doi request reprint Activity of topical antimicrobial agents against multidrug-resistant bacteria recovered from burn patients
    Jessie S Glasser
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Burns 36:1172-84. 2010
    ..We compared two methods of determining topical antimicrobial susceptibilities...
  38. ncbi request reprint Recovery of multidrug-resistant bacteria from combat personnel evacuated from Iraq and Afghanistan at a single military treatment facility
    Clinton K Murray
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 27834, USA
    Mil Med 174:598-604. 2009
    ..Novel techniques are needed to control the impact of MDR bacteria in medical facilities...
  39. doi request reprint Serum vancomycin levels resulting from continuous or intermittent infusion in critically ill burn patients with or without continuous renal replacement therapy
    Kevin S Akers
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    J Burn Care Res 33:e254-62. 2012
    ....
  40. doi request reprint Microbiology and injury characteristics in severe open tibia fractures from combat
    Travis C Burns
    Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3551 Roger Brooke Dr, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Trauma Acute Care Surg 72:1062-7. 2012
    ..Type III open tibia fractures are common combat injuries. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of injury characteristics and surveillance cultures on outcomes in combat-related severe open tibia fractures...
  41. doi request reprint Guidelines for the prevention of infection after combat-related injuries
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Brooke Army Medical Center, US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    J Trauma 64:S211-20. 2008
    ....
  42. doi request reprint Executive summary: Guidelines for the prevention of infections associated with combat-related injuries: 2011 update: endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Surgical Infection Society
    Duane R Hospenthal
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S202-9. 2011
    ....
  43. doi request reprint Response to infection control challenges in the deployed setting: Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 69:S94-101. 2010
    ..In response, efforts to emphasize IC basics, improve expertise, and better track MDRO colonization were pursued...
  44. pmc Aminoglycoside resistance and susceptibility testing errors in Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex
    Kevin S Akers
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234 6200, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 48:1132-8. 2010
    ..Determination of the relative contribution of multiple concurrent resistance mechanisms may improve our understanding of aminoglycoside resistance in the Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex...
  45. ncbi request reprint Acinetobacter skin carriage among US army soldiers deployed in Iraq
    Matthew E Griffith
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 28:720-2. 2007
    ..This observation refutes the hypothesis that preinjury skin carriage serves as the reservoir for the Acinetobacter infections seen in US military combat casualties...
  46. doi request reprint Incidence and bacteriology of burn infections at a military burn center
    Edward F Keen
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 36:461-8. 2010
    ....
  47. pmc Susceptibility of acinetobacter strains isolated from deployed U.S. military personnel
    Joshua S Hawley
    Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI 7E, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 51:376-8. 2007
    ..S. soldiers deployed overseas) to 13 antimicrobial agents were determined by broth microdilution. The most active antimicrobial agents (> or =95% of isolates susceptible) were colistin, polymyxin B, and minocycline...
  48. doi request reprint Infections in combat casualties during Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 66:S138-44. 2009
    ..The Joint Theater Trauma Registry (JTTR) has been established to collect injury specific medical data from casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan...
  49. doi request reprint Causes of mortality by autopsy findings of combat casualties and civilian patients admitted to a burn unit
    Ruben Gomez
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Am Coll Surg 208:348-54. 2009
    ..Approximately 5% of combat-related injuries include burns. Previous studies have shown similar mortality rates between military and civilian burn casualties; but causes of death were not detailed...
  50. doi request reprint Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus blood and skin and soft tissue infections in the US military health system, 2005-2010
    Michael L Landrum
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    JAMA 308:50-9. 2012
    ..Rates of hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are reported as decreasing, but recent rates of community-onset S. aureus infections are less known...
  51. ncbi request reprint Bacteriology of war wounds at the time of injury
    Clinton K Murray
    Department of Medicine, Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Mil Med 171:826-9. 2006
    ..These data suggest that the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics with efficacy against more resistant, Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., is unnecessary in early wound management...
  52. doi request reprint Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance among a collection of Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates in a Texas city
    Jason W Bennett
    Department of Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 66:445-8. 2010
    ..One Enterobacter cloacae produced derepressed AmpC beta-lactamase, 1 Escherichia coli expressed plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase, and 1 E. cloacae produced a carbapenemase...
  53. pmc Colistin heteroresistance in acinetobacter and its association with previous colistin therapy
    Joshua S Hawley
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 52:351-2. 2008
    ..The proportion of cells exhibiting heteroresistance was significantly higher among isolates recovered from patients treated with colistin...
  54. ncbi request reprint Endocarditis in burn patients: clinical and diagnostic considerations
    Jason A Regules
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    Burns 34:610-6. 2008
    ..Further analysis of the clinical presentation and diagnosis may aid in the earlier recognition and decreased mortality of endocarditis in burned patients...
  55. pmc Fungal wound infection (not colonization) is independently associated with mortality in burn patients
    Edward E Horvath
    U S Army Institute of Surgical Research, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Ann Surg 245:978-85. 2007
    ..To analyze the occurrence of fungal wound infection (FWI) after thermal injury and its relationship to mortality...
  56. ncbi request reprint Acinetobacter skin colonization of US Army Soldiers
    Matthew E Griffith
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 27:659-61. 2006
    ..To evaluate whether skin colonization with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex exists in a population of healthy, nondeployed US Army soldiers and, if present, how it might relate to the infections seen in current war casualties...
  57. doi request reprint High incidence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria recovered from Afghan patients at a deployed US military hospital
    Deena E Sutter
    Department of Pediatrics, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, TX, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 32:854-60. 2011
    ..To investigate potential sources and risks associated with multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in a deployed US military hospital...
  58. doi request reprint Temporary external fixation is safe in a combat environment
    Daniel R Possley
    United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234 6315, USA
    J Trauma 69:S135-9. 2010
    ..We hypothesize that external fixation is a safe and effective initial stabilization procedure for combat-related open fractures...
  59. pmc Efficacy of macrolides and telithromycin against leptospirosis in a hamster model
    James E Moon
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:1989-92. 2006
    ..We conclude that all agents tested have demonstrated in vivo efficacy in treating acute leptospirosis. These results provide support for further evaluation of macrolide and ketolide antimicrobial agents in human trials...
  60. ncbi request reprint Development of a deployment infection control course
    Helen K Crouch
    Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, MCHE MDI Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Mil Med 175:983-9. 2010
    ..We describe the deployment-unique training developed to provide basic IC, emphasizing the unique challenges found in the combat setting...
  61. doi request reprint Prevention and management of infections associated with combat-related extremity injuries
    Clinton K Murray
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    J Trauma 64:S239-51. 2008
    ..Most of the recommendations are not supported by randomized controlled trials or adequate cohorts studies in a military population and further efforts are needed to answer best treatment strategies...
  62. doi request reprint Infectious complications of combat-related mangled extremity injuries in the British military
    Kate V Brown
    Regenerative Medicine, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 69:S109-15. 2010
    ..This study evaluates the infectious complications and possible risk factors of British military casualties with mangled extremities, highlighting initial care and infections...
  63. doi request reprint Hospital-acquired device-associated infections at a deployed military hospital in Iraq
    Erica N Johnson
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 66:S157-63. 2009
    ..We describe the rates of utilization and device-associated infections at the Air Force Theater Hospital (AFTH) in Iraq...
  64. doi request reprint Epidemiology of infections associated with combat-related injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan
    Clinton K Murray
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    J Trauma 64:S232-8. 2008
    ..In addition, the likely sources of combat-related injuries with multidrug resistant bacteria infections are explored...
  65. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, and elevated temperature as predictors of bloodstream infection in burn patients
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Arch Surg 142:639-42. 2007
    ..To investigate whether specific values of or changes in temperature, white blood cell count, or neutrophil percentage were predictive of bloodstream infection in burn patients...
  66. doi request reprint Effect of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on antimicrobial susceptibilities for gram-negative rods
    Aaron R Farmer
    Department of Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    J Basic Microbiol 53:336-9. 2013
    ..Broth microdilution was performed with and without dose-ranging concentrations of lovastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin. No effects on antimicrobial activity were demonstrated...
  67. doi request reprint In vitro toxicity and activity of Dakin's solution, mafenide acetate, and amphotericin B on filamentous fungi and human cells
    Alice Barsoumian
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
    J Orthop Trauma 27:428-36. 2013
    ..We evaluated the in vitro activity of topical agents in varying combinations and concentrations against molds from patients that were responsible for wound invasive fungal infections and the topical agents' toxicity to human cells...
  68. doi request reprint Variations of CHROMagar Acinetobacter to detect imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex
    Alice Barsoumian
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    Scand J Infect Dis 45:446-52. 2013
    ..We examined various combinations of available media to detect imipenem resistance among 107 ABC clinical isolates...
  69. doi request reprint Ventilator associated pneumonia in a military deployed setting: the impact of an aggressive infection control program
    Michael L Landrum
    From the Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Trauma 64:S123-7; discussion S127-8. 2008
    ..We describe the rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) before and after the implementation of aggressive infection control measures at the Air Force Theater Hospital in Iraq...
  70. doi request reprint Osteomyelitis in military personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan
    Heather C Yun
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Trauma 64:S163-8; discussion S168. 2008
    ..We describe demographics and microbiology of OIF/OEF casualties with primary and recurrent osteomyelitis...
  71. doi request reprint Use of patient-specific Leptospira isolates in the diagnosis of leptospirosis employing microscopic agglutination testing (MAT)
    Clinton K Murray
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 105:209-13. 2011
    ..However, the serovar with the highest titers did not match the cultured serovar. Region-specific MATs did not appear to be reliable in detection of infection or in identifying the infecting serovar...
  72. ncbi request reprint Rates of gonorrhea and Chlamydia in U.S. military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan (2004-2009)
    Wade K Aldous
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Mil Med 176:705-10. 2011
    ..Ongoing education with emphasis on prevention and treatment are needed, as are development of specific projects to define the risk factors and timing of acquisition of sexually transmitted infections in combat zones...
  73. ncbi request reprint Antimicrobial therapy of leptospirosis
    Matthew E Griffith
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Curr Opin Infect Dis 19:533-7. 2006
    ..The optimal antimicrobial treatment for this disease has not been established. This review summarizes the most recent literature pertaining to the use of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of leptospirosis...
  74. doi request reprint History of infections associated with combat-related injuries
    Clinton K Murray
    San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    J Trauma 64:S221-31. 2008
    ..This article reviews the history of war wound infections, with an emphasis on wound microbiology and combat casualty management during US conflicts from World War I through the end of 20th century...
  75. ncbi request reprint Earlier debridement and antibiotic administration decrease infection
    Kate V Brown
    US Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3400 Rawley E Chambers, Suite B, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Surg Orthop Adv 19:18-22. 2010
    ..It was concluded that early debridement in combination with local delivery of antibiotics of contaminated defects may reduce infections...
  76. pmc Broth microdilution susceptibility testing for Leptospira spp
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 48:1548-52. 2004
    ..The macrodilution and microdilution techniques produced similar results, with microdilution allowing a faster, more streamlined method of producing MIC results...
  77. doi request reprint Occupational exposure to blood and other bodily fluids at a military hospital in Iraq
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 66:S62-8. 2009
    ....
  78. ncbi request reprint Development of a deployment course for graduating military internal medicine residents
    Clinton K Murray
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Mil Med 171:933-6. 2006
    ..Residents uniformly accepted the course with measurable increase in their fund of knowledge at the completion of the course...
  79. doi request reprint Acinetobacter infection in the ICU
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Crit Care Clin 24:237-48, vii. 2008
    ..Infection control and antibiotic control measures might have the greatest impact on these bacteria. Continued efforts are needed to develop new antimicrobial agents against this pathogen and assess the ideal currently available agents...
  80. ncbi request reprint Diminished vancomycin and daptomycin susceptibility during prolonged bacteremia with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    Jason W Bennett
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 60:437-40. 2008
    ..The MRSA strain developed diminished susceptibility to vancomycin (MIC increase and tolerance), daptomycin, and gentamicin, and resistance to rifampin during therapy...
  81. ncbi request reprint Impact of Acinetobacter infection on the mortality of burn patients
    Michael C Albrecht
    US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Am Coll Surg 203:546-50. 2006
    ..Although Acb can be associated with multidrug resistance, its impact on mortality in burn patients has not been fully elucidated...
  82. ncbi request reprint Spectrum of care provided at an echelon II Medical Unit during Operation Iraqi Freedom
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Mil Med 170:516-20. 2005
    ..Determining the types of casualties seen at forward echelons of medical care during different phases of conflict can aid medical planning and help predict the type of medical resources required...
  83. ncbi request reprint Infectious disease teleconsultative support of deployed healthcare providers
    Ana E Morgan
    Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Mil Med 174:1055-60. 2009
    ..Data from this program should be useful in focusing predeployment provider training. It also provides the military ID community situational awareness of problems encountered in theater...
  84. ncbi request reprint Infectious complications of open type III tibial fractures among combat casualties
    Erica N Johnson
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 45:409-15. 2007
    ..Combat is associated with high-energy explosive injuries, often resulting in open tibial fractures complicated by nonunion and infection. We characterize the infections seen in conjunction with combat-associated type III tibial fractures...
  85. ncbi request reprint Determination of the internal medicine service's role in emergency department length of stay at a military medical center
    Jessie S Glasser
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Mil Med 174:1163-6. 2009
    ..Increasing numbers of emergency department (ED) visits and higher leaving-without-being-seen rates resulted in an evaluation of the contribution of the internal medicine service to the admission process...
  86. ncbi request reprint Analysis of anaerobic blood cultures in burned patients
    Jason A Regules
    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 33:561-4. 2007
    ..However anaerobic blood cultures systems are also able to detect facultative and obligate aerobic bacteria; therefore, the deletion of the anaerobic culture medium may have deleterious clinical impact...
  87. doi request reprint Effect of various concentrations of antibiotics on osteogenic cell viability and activity
    Christopher R Rathbone
    United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3400 Rawley E Chambers, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Orthop Res 29:1070-4. 2011
    ..This comprehensive evaluation of numerous antibiotics' effects on osteoblast viability and activity will enable clinicians and researchers to choose the optimal antibiotic for treatment of infection and maintenance of healthy host bone...
  88. doi request reprint Preface: Guidelines for the prevention of infections associated with combat-related injuries: 2011 update
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Trauma 71:S197-201. 2011
    ....
  89. ncbi request reprint The role of antifungal susceptibility testing in the therapy of candidiasis
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 48:153-60. 2004
    ....
  90. pmc Direct comparison of the BACTEC 9240 and BacT/ALERT 3D automated blood culture systems for candida growth detection
    Lynn L Horvath
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 42:115-8. 2004
    ..However, when only standard aerobic and anaerobic media were used, the BacT performed better than the Bactec in overall growth detection, time to growth detection, and number of false-negatives...
  91. pmc Detection of simulated candidemia by the BACTEC 9240 system with plus aerobic/F and anaerobic/F blood culture bottles
    Lynn L Horvath
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 41:4714-7. 2003
    ..glabrata is clinically significant. Given the high rate of false negatives, terminal subcultures may be helpful in certain situations...
  92. ncbi request reprint Rapid diagnostic testing for malaria
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Diseases Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Trop Med Int Health 8:876-83. 2003
    ....
  93. pmc In vitro susceptibilities of seven Leptospira species to traditional and newer antibiotics
    Duane R Hospenthal
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 47:2646-8. 2003
    ..With the exception of chloramphenicol, all tested agents were at least as potent as penicillin and doxycycline, with the macrolide and ketolide drugs producing the lowest MICs (and minimal bactericidal concentrations)...
  94. pmc Direct isolation of Candida spp. from blood cultures on the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida
    Lynn L Horvath
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 41:2629-32. 2003
    ..Direct isolation could allow mycology laboratories to more rapidly identify Candida spp., enable clinicians to more quickly make antifungal agent selections, and potentially decrease patient morbidity and mortality...
  95. ncbi request reprint Fusarium proliferatum superficial suppurative thrombophlebitis
    Clinton K Murray
    Department of Medicine, Infectious Diseases Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Mil Med 168:426-7. 2003
    ..We report a case of Fusarium proliferatum superficial suppurative thrombophlebitis in an immunocompetent patient with no evidence of systemic infection and who responded to venotomy alone...
  96. ncbi request reprint Short report: Treatment failure in Hansen's disease
    Clinton K Murray
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234 6200, USA
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 68:233-4. 2003
    ..The accurate diagnosis of relapse of this disease is essential not only in the individual patient but also for prospective treatment trials to establish best practices...
  97. pmc Determination of susceptibilities of 26 Leptospira sp. serovars to 24 antimicrobial agents by a broth microdilution technique
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease MCHE MDI, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 48:4002-5. 2004
    ..01 microg/ml. The MIC(90)s of amoxicillin, aztreonam, cefdinir, chloramphenicol, and penicillin G were >/=3.13 microg/ml. Many antimicrobials have excellent in vitro activity against Leptospira...
  98. ncbi request reprint Medical problems of detainees after the conclusion of major ground combat during Operation Iraqi Freedom
    Clinton K Murray
    1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, APO AE 09394
    Mil Med 170:501-4. 2005
    ..Medical problems not traditionally dealt with in a combat theater, including management of transplant recipients, patients with cardiac valve replacement, and cancer patient, were also seen...
  99. pmc Pneumonia in military trainees: a comparison study based on adenovirus serotype 14 infection
    Todd J Vento
    Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    J Infect Dis 203:1388-95. 2011
    ..This study was conducted to determine whether Ad-14 is associated with clinical outcomes in otherwise healthy patients with pneumonia...
  100. pmc Central nervous system toxicity associated with liposomal amphotericin B therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis
    Jessie S Glasser
    US Infectious Disease Service, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 84:566-8. 2011
    ..This is a potential side effect of liposomal amphotericin B that can be observed in otherwise healthy patients...
  101. ncbi request reprint Viability of Leptospira in BacT/ALERT MB media
    Matthew E Griffith
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 54:263-6. 2006
    ..Viable leptospires were detected in MB bottles up to day 14. FA and SN were performed in accordance with prior data. We conclude that MB and enriched MB bottles of the BacT/ALERT blood culture system can support viable leptospires...