Robert William Kenefick

Summary

Affiliation: Walter Reed Army Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint High skin temperature and hypohydration impair aerobic performance
    Michael N Sawka
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 42 Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Exp Physiol 97:327-32. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Hydration at the work site
    Robert W Kenefick
    United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 42 Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    J Am Coll Nutr 26:597S-603S. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Heat exhaustion and dehydration as causes of marathon collapse
    Robert W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts 01760, USA
    Sports Med 37:378-81. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Thermoregulatory function during the marathon
    Robert W Kenefick
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts 01760, USA
    Sports Med 37:312-5. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Rehydration with fluid of varying tonicities: effects on fluid regulatory hormones and exercise performance in the heat
    R W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    J Appl Physiol 102:1899-905. 2007
  6. doi request reprint Prior heat stress: effect on subsequent 15-min time trial performance in the heat
    Robert W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 41:1311-6. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Rapid IV versus oral rehydration: responses to subsequent exercise heat stress
    Robert W Kenefick
    U S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:2125-31. 2006
  8. doi request reprint Effect of increased plasma osmolality on cold-induced thirst attenuation
    Robert William Kenefick
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Kansas Street, Natick, MA, 01760, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 104:1013-9. 2008
  9. doi request reprint DEET insect repellent: effects on thermoregulatory sweating and physiological strain
    Robert W Kenefick
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 111:3061-8. 2011
  10. doi request reprint Biological and analytical variation of the human sweating response: implications for study design and analysis
    Robert W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Kansas St Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 302:R252-8. 2012

Detail Information

Publications31

  1. doi request reprint High skin temperature and hypohydration impair aerobic performance
    Michael N Sawka
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 42 Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Exp Physiol 97:327-32. 2012
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Hydration at the work site
    Robert W Kenefick
    United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 42 Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    J Am Coll Nutr 26:597S-603S. 2007
    ..Improved occupational guidelines for fluid and electrolyte replacement during hot weather occupational activities should be developed to include recommendations for fluid consumption before, during, and after work...
  3. ncbi request reprint Heat exhaustion and dehydration as causes of marathon collapse
    Robert W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts 01760, USA
    Sports Med 37:378-81. 2007
    ..Other factors contributing to post-race collapse might include reduced skeletal muscle pump activity and dehydration and prior heat stress mediated changes in cerebrovascular responses to orthostatic challenges...
  4. ncbi request reprint Thermoregulatory function during the marathon
    Robert W Kenefick
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts 01760, USA
    Sports Med 37:312-5. 2007
    ..The combined challenge of exercise and environment associated with marathon running can substantially challenge the human thermoregulatory system...
  5. ncbi request reprint Rehydration with fluid of varying tonicities: effects on fluid regulatory hormones and exercise performance in the heat
    R W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    J Appl Physiol 102:1899-905. 2007
    ..Neither a fluid of greater tonicity nor the route of administration resulted in a more rapid or greater fluid retention, nor did it enhance heat tolerance or diminish physiological strain during subsequent exercise in the heat...
  6. doi request reprint Prior heat stress: effect on subsequent 15-min time trial performance in the heat
    Robert W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 41:1311-6. 2009
    ..The impact of prior heat stress on subsequent aerobic exercise-heat performance has not been studied...
  7. ncbi request reprint Rapid IV versus oral rehydration: responses to subsequent exercise heat stress
    Robert W Kenefick
    U S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 38:2125-31. 2006
    ..This study sought to determine the effect of rapid intravenous (IV) versus oral (ORAL) rehydration immediately after dehydration, on cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and perceptual responses during subsequent exercise in the heat...
  8. doi request reprint Effect of increased plasma osmolality on cold-induced thirst attenuation
    Robert William Kenefick
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Kansas Street, Natick, MA, 01760, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 104:1013-9. 2008
    ..Thirst ratings remained elevated (P < 0.05) in the DH + NaCl treatment 30 min after dosing and 45 min at 4 degrees C versus DH + P and EU + P. Attenuation of thirst when dehydrated in the cold can be over-ridden by increasing P (osm)...
  9. doi request reprint DEET insect repellent: effects on thermoregulatory sweating and physiological strain
    Robert W Kenefick
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 111:3061-8. 2011
    ..DEET can be safely worn during military, occupational and recreational activities in hot, insect infested environments...
  10. doi request reprint Biological and analytical variation of the human sweating response: implications for study design and analysis
    Robert W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Kansas St Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 302:R252-8. 2012
    ..changes in SR. These findings provide a quantitative basis for study design and optimization of power/sample size analysis in the evaluation of thermoregulatory sweating...
  11. doi request reprint Skin temperature modifies the impact of hypohydration on aerobic performance
    R W Kenefick
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    J Appl Physiol 109:79-86. 2010
    ..6% for each additional 1 degrees C T(sk); and 3) cardiovascular strain from high skin blood flow requirements combined with blood volume reductions induced by hypohydration is an important contributor to impaired performance...
  12. doi request reprint Evidence against a 40 degrees C core temperature threshold for fatigue in humans
    Brett R Ely
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    J Appl Physiol 107:1519-25. 2009
    ..Our observation that runners were able to sustain running velocity despite T(re) >40 degrees C is evidence against 40 degrees C representing a "critical" core temperature limit to performance...
  13. doi request reprint Aerobic performance is degraded, despite modest hyperthermia, in hot environments
    Brett R Ely
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 42:135-41. 2010
    ..Environmental heat stress degrades aerobic performance; however, little research has focused on performance when the selected task elicits modest elevations in core body temperature (<38.5 degrees C)...
  14. doi request reprint Hypohydration reduces vertical ground reaction impulse but not jump height
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 109:1163-70. 2010
    ..05). In conclusion, this study demonstrates the failure to improve jump height when HYP can be explained by offsetting reductions in both VGRI and body mass...
  15. doi request reprint Biological variation and diagnostic accuracy of dehydration assessment markers
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 92:565-73. 2010
    ..Well-recognized markers for static (one time) or dynamic (monitoring over time) dehydration assessment have not been rigorously tested for their usefulness in clinical, military, and sports medicine communities...
  16. doi request reprint Mechanisms of aerobic performance impairment with heat stress and dehydration
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    J Appl Physiol 109:1989-95. 2010
    ..Dehydration augments hyperthermia and plasma volume reductions, which combine to accentuate cardiovascular strain and reduce Vo(2max). Importantly, the negative performance consequences of dehydration worsen as T(sk) increases...
  17. doi request reprint Effect of hypohydration and altitude exposure on aerobic exercise performance and acute mountain sickness
    John W Castellani
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, U S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 42 Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    J Appl Physiol 109:1792-800. 2010
    ..07). In conclusion, hypohydration at 3,048 m 1) degrades aerobic performance in an additive manner with that induced by ALT; and 2) did not appear to increase the prevalence/severity of AMS symptoms...
  18. doi request reprint A simple and valid method to determine thermoregulatory sweating threshold and sensitivity
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    J Appl Physiol 107:69-75. 2009
    ..Rater and SReg were not different by conventional t-test (P > 0.05). SReg provides a simple, valid, and standardized way to determine sweating threshold temperature and sweating sensitivity values for thermoregulatory studies...
  19. ncbi request reprint Impact of a protective vest and spacer garment on exercise-heat strain
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Kansas Street, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 102:577-83. 2008
    ..05). SR was higher (P < 0.05) in P and S versus B, but the magnitude of differences was small. A protective vest increases physiological strain independent of added load, while a spacer garment does not alter this outcome...
  20. doi request reprint No effect of nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists on exercise performance in the heat
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    U S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 296:R394-401. 2009
    ..05) or the self-selected pacing strategy employed. These findings indicate that the nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists caffeine and quercetin do not enhance endurance exercise performance during compensable heat stress...
  21. doi request reprint Serum S-100beta response to exercise-heat strain before and after acclimation
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760 5007, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 40:1477-82. 2008
    ..However, the explanatory power of exercise with marked environmental heat stress on the appearance of S-100beta is questionable. It is possible that the process of heat acclimation might afford additional insight...
  22. doi request reprint Effect of heat acclimation on sweat minerals
    Troy D Chinevere
    U S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 40:886-91. 2008
    ..This study examined the impact of 10 d of exercise-heat acclimation on sweat mineral concentrations...
  23. doi request reprint Influence of sensor ingestion timing on consistency of temperature measures
    Daniel A Goodman
    US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 41:597-602. 2009
    ..However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and T int measurement has not been thoroughly studied...
  24. ncbi request reprint The impact of different pacing strategies on five-kilometer running time trial performance
    Amy E Gosztyla
    Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    J Strength Cond Res 20:882-6. 2006
    ..In order to optimize 5-km performance, runners should start the initial 1.63 km of a 5-km race at paces 3-6% greater than their current average race pace...
  25. ncbi request reprint Two short, daily activity bouts vs. one long bout: are health and fitness improvements similar over twelve and twenty-four weeks?
    Timothy J Quinn
    University of New Hampshire, Department of Kinesiology, Robert Kertzer Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Durham, 03824, USA
    J Strength Cond Res 20:130-5. 2006
    ..This study suggests that an INT exercise program, which is incremental in nature, provides comparable, and in some cases greater, health and fitness benefits than those expected following traditional CON exercise training...
  26. ncbi request reprint Thirst sensations and AVP responses at rest and during exercise-cold exposure
    Robert W Kenefick
    Department of Kinesiology, The University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 36:1528-34. 2004
    ..The purpose of this study was to 1) determine the effect of hypohydration (HYPO) on thirst sensations during moderate exercise in the cold and 2) determine a possible mechanism for a cold-induced decline in thirst...
  27. ncbi request reprint Hypohydration effects on thermoregulation during moderate exercise in the cold
    Robert W Kenefick
    Department of Kinesiology, The University of New Hampshire, New Hampshire Hall, NH 03824, Durham, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 92:565-70. 2004
    ..These data demonstrate that moderate intensity exercise in the cold while hypohydrated does not alter metabolic heat production, skin temperatures and heat loss, nor does it increase thermoregulatory and cardiovascular strain...
  28. ncbi request reprint Hypohydration adversely affects lactate threshold in endurance athletes
    Robert W Kenefick
    Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, New Hampshire Hall, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA
    J Strength Cond Res 16:38-43. 2002
    ..From these results, we speculate that hypohydration did not significantly alter cardiovascular function or buffering capacity but did cause LAT to occur at a lower absolute exercise intensity...
  29. ncbi request reprint Wave reflection and central aortic pressure are increased in response to static and dynamic muscle contraction at comparable workloads
    David G Edwards
    Dept of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences, 541 South College Ave, 142 HPL, Newark, DE 19716, USA
    J Appl Physiol 104:439-45. 2008
    ..The present data suggest that wave reflection is an important determinant of the central blood pressure response during forearm muscle contractions...
  30. ncbi request reprint Carbohydrate supplementation and immune responses after acute exhaustive resistance exercise
    Lara A Carlson
    Dept of Natural Sciences, Castleton State College, Castleton, VT 05735, USA
    Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 18:247-59. 2008
    ..The findings of this study indicate the following: ARE appears to evoke changes in immune cells similar to those previously reported during endurance exercise, and CHO ingestion attenuates lymphocytosis after ARE...
  31. ncbi request reprint Important insight from the 2003 Singapore half-marathon
    Samuel N Cheuvront
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 39:1883; author reply 1884. 2007