Joel C Gaydos

Summary

Affiliation: Walter Reed Army Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Department of Defense Global Emergings Infections Surveillance and Response System
    Joel C Gaydos
    Mil Med 173:v-vi. 2008
  2. pmc Swine influenza a outbreak, Fort Dix, New Jersey, 1976
    Joel C Gaydos
    Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 7500, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 12:23-8. 2006
  3. pmc The importance of militaries from developing countries in global infectious disease surveillance
    Jean Paul Chretien
    Department of Defense, Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
    Bull World Health Organ 85:174-80. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Selected nonvaccine interventions to prevent infectious acute respiratory disease
    Terrence Lee
    U S Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD 21010 5403, USA
    Am J Prev Med 28:305-16. 2005
  5. pmc Malaria and other vector-borne infection surveillance in the U.S. Department of Defense Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance program: review of 2009 accomplishments
    Mark M Fukuda
    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, 2900 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
    BMC Public Health 11:S9. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Cost and effectiveness of Chlamydia screening among male military recruits: Markov modeling of complications averted through notification of prior female partners
    Remington L Nevin
    Army Medical Surveillance Activity, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 35:705-13. 2008
  7. pmc Capacity-building efforts by the AFHSC-GEIS program
    Jose L Sanchez
    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, 503 Robert Grant Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
    BMC Public Health 11:S4. 2011
  8. ncbi request reprint The importance of militaries from developing countries in global infectious disease surveillance
    Jean Paul Chretien
    Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Silver Spring, USA
    World Hosp Health Serv 43:32-7. 2007
  9. doi request reprint Incidence rates of pelvic inflammatory disease diagnoses among Army and Navy recruits potential impacts of Chlamydia screening policies
    Michael S Bloom
    Army Medical Surveillance Activity, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
    Am J Prev Med 34:471-7. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System Indian Ocean tsunami response
    Jean Paul Chretien
    Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Division of Preventive Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 20910 7500, USA
    Mil Med 171:12-4. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. ncbi request reprint Department of Defense Global Emergings Infections Surveillance and Response System
    Joel C Gaydos
    Mil Med 173:v-vi. 2008
  2. pmc Swine influenza a outbreak, Fort Dix, New Jersey, 1976
    Joel C Gaydos
    Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 7500, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 12:23-8. 2006
    ..Despite efforts to define the events at Fort Dix, many questions remain unanswered, including the following: Where did A/New Jersey come from? Why did transmission stop?..
  3. pmc The importance of militaries from developing countries in global infectious disease surveillance
    Jean Paul Chretien
    Department of Defense, Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
    Bull World Health Organ 85:174-80. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Selected nonvaccine interventions to prevent infectious acute respiratory disease
    Terrence Lee
    U S Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD 21010 5403, USA
    Am J Prev Med 28:305-16. 2005
    ..Vaccines have been used to protect against ARD; however, these are not always available or effective...
  5. pmc Malaria and other vector-borne infection surveillance in the U.S. Department of Defense Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance program: review of 2009 accomplishments
    Mark M Fukuda
    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, 2900 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
    BMC Public Health 11:S9. 2011
    ..This review describes recent VBI-related epidemiological studies conducted by AFHSC-GEIS partner laboratories within the OCONUS DoD laboratory network emphasizing their impact on human populations...
  6. doi request reprint Cost and effectiveness of Chlamydia screening among male military recruits: Markov modeling of complications averted through notification of prior female partners
    Remington L Nevin
    Army Medical Surveillance Activity, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 35:705-13. 2008
    ..Males comprise the majority of US military recruits and represent an ideal population in which to achieve identification and interruption of sexually transmitted infection among infected partners through mass tandem screening...
  7. pmc Capacity-building efforts by the AFHSC-GEIS program
    Jose L Sanchez
    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, 503 Robert Grant Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
    BMC Public Health 11:S4. 2011
    ..S. government agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Department of State...
  8. ncbi request reprint The importance of militaries from developing countries in global infectious disease surveillance
    Jean Paul Chretien
    Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Silver Spring, USA
    World Hosp Health Serv 43:32-7. 2007
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Incidence rates of pelvic inflammatory disease diagnoses among Army and Navy recruits potential impacts of Chlamydia screening policies
    Michael S Bloom
    Army Medical Surveillance Activity, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
    Am J Prev Med 34:471-7. 2008
    ..Using routinely collected surveillance data, the rates of outpatient pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) following accession into the Army or Navy were compared to assess the potential implications of these policies...
  10. ncbi request reprint Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System Indian Ocean tsunami response
    Jean Paul Chretien
    Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Division of Preventive Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 20910 7500, USA
    Mil Med 171:12-4. 2006
    ..Preexisting collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and host countries was critical for the DoD-GEIS tsunami response...
  11. pmc Global Infectious Disease Surveillance at DoD Overseas Laboratories, 1999-2007
    J Jeremy Sueker
    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910, USA
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 82:23-7. 2010
    ..Areas for further program strengthening are identified...
  12. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of a rapid quantitative diagnostic test for adenovirus type 4
    Dennis J Faix
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 38:391-7. 2004
    ..Individuals with test results positive for Ad4 were hospitalized longer than were individuals with negative test results. Higher virus loads at hospital admission corresponded to longer lengths of stay for Ad4-positive subjects...
  13. doi request reprint Prevalence of seropositivity to spotted fever group rickettsiae and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in a large, demographically diverse US sample
    Paul C F Graf
    Viral and Rickettsial Diseases Department, Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 46:70-7. 2008
    ..Most epidemiologic studies of tick-borne rickettsial diseases in the United States are small and have limited demographic scope, making broader risk assessment difficult...
  14. ncbi request reprint Comparison of the urine Leukocyte Esterase Test to a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for screening non-health care-seeking male soldiers for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections
    Billie Jo Wood
    Johns Hopkins University, 720 Rutland Avenue, Ross 1164, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Mil Med 172:770-2. 2007
    ..In this population, the prevalence of gonorrhea was too low to produce reliable estimates of performance characteristics of the LET for gonorrhea. The LET is not warranted for use in screening non-health care-seeking male Army trainees...
  15. ncbi request reprint Hospitalization rates in female US Army recruits associated with a screening program for Chlamydia trachomatis
    Kathryn L Clark
    Allied Technology Group, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 29:1-5. 2002
    ..A volunteer program to test non-healthcare-seeking women for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection was instituted at the US Army's largest basic training center and evaluated for its effectiveness in reducing sequelae...
  16. ncbi request reprint Feasibility and short-term impact of linked education and urine screening interventions for Chlamydia and gonorrhea in male army recruits
    Christine M Arcari
    Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 31:443-7. 2004
    ..The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of an intervention for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and a screening program for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in male Army recruits...
  17. pmc Evaluation of dry and wet transported intravaginal swabs in detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in female soldiers by PCR
    Charlotte A Gaydos
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health and Hygiene, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 40:758-61. 2002
    ..9% (24 of 27) and 98.3% (753 of 766), respectively. PCR testing of wet and dry transported intravaginal swabs to detect chlamydia and gonorrhea infections was an accurate diagnostic method for military women...
  18. ncbi request reprint Influenza outbreak and response preparedness in the Air National Guard
    Anna M Likos
    Maryland Air National Guard, 175th Medical Squadron, Baltimore, MD 21220, USA
    Mil Med 167:929-33. 2002
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Chlamydia in the United States military: can we win this war?
    Charlotte A Gaydos
    Sex Transm Dis 35:260-2. 2008
  20. ncbi request reprint The incidence of eye injuries at three U.S. Army installations
    David A Hsieh
    Clinical Information Technology Program Office, U S Department of Defense Health Affairs, 5113 Leesburg Pike, Suite 701, Falls Church, VA 22041 3200, USA
    Mil Med 168:101-5. 2003
    ..29%) of the soldiers were not wearing eye protection when injured. This study identifies possible targets for intervention and provides a baseline against which the interventions of the last decade may be assessed for effectiveness...
  21. ncbi request reprint Sustained high prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in female army recruits
    Charlotte A Gaydos
    Infectious Disease Division, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Sex Transm Dis 30:539-44. 2003
    ..Screening and treatment of infected females has been demonstrated to prevent sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease...
  22. ncbi request reprint How contagious are common respiratory tract infections?
    Joshua D Hartzell
    N Engl J Med 349:95. 2003
  23. pmc Vaccine-preventable adenoviral respiratory illness in US military recruits, 1999-2004
    Kevin L Russell
    Department of Defense Center for Deployment Health Research, Naval Health Research Center, P O Box 85122, San Diego, CA 92186 5122, USA
    Vaccine 24:2835-42. 2006
    ..Laboratory diagnoses complimented the surveillance efforts...
  24. ncbi request reprint Prevalence of chlamydial and gonococcal infections among young adults
    Charlotte A Gaydos
    JAMA 292:801; author reply 801-2. 2004
  25. ncbi request reprint Adenovirus-associated acute respiratory disease in healthy adolescents and adults: a literature review
    Anjali V Sivan
    U S Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 5403, USA
    Mil Med 172:1198-203. 2007
    ..Currently availability, sensitive, molecular diagnostic tests may better define the importance of AARD in populations outside the U.S. military...
  26. ncbi request reprint Emergence of adenovirus type 14 in US military recruits--a new challenge
    Leonard N Binn
    J Infect Dis 196:1436-7. 2007
  27. ncbi request reprint Clinical presentations for influenza and influenza-like illness in young, immunized soldiers
    K Mills McNeill
    State Epidemiologist, Mississippi State Department of Health, Jackson, MS 39215, USA
    Mil Med 170:94-7. 2005
    ..3% of these had an infiltrate. Clinical findings did not differentiate ILI caused by the various agents. Only 29 cases of influenza occurred in approximately 7,200 person-years of observation, supporting the use of influenza vaccine...
  28. ncbi request reprint Hepatitis B immunity in United States military recruits
    Paul T Scott
    Army Medical Surveillance Activity, US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Washington, DC, USA
    J Infect Dis 191:1835-41. 2005
    ..A DoD study reported that screening for immunity with selective immunization would be cost-effective at a prevalence of immunity of >12%. The prevalence of hepatitis B immunity in the military recruit population was unknown...
  29. pmc Comparing diagnostic coding and laboratory results
    Asha J Riegodedios
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:1151-3. 2005
  30. ncbi request reprint Experience of a global laboratory network in responding to infectious disease epidemics
    Jean Paul Chretien
    Lancet Infect Dis 6:538-40. 2006