Michael W Ellis

Summary

Affiliation: Walter Reed Army Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Is antimicrobial therapy needed to manage uncomplicated skin and soft-tissue abscesses?
    Michael W Ellis
    Infectious Disease Service, MCHE MDI, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 6:9-13. 2008
  2. ncbi Natural history of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in soldiers
    Michael W Ellis
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 39:971-9. 2004
  3. ncbi Treatment approaches for community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections
    Michael W Ellis
    Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Curr Opin Infect Dis 18:496-501. 2005
  4. pmc Presence and molecular epidemiology of virulence factors in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains colonizing and infecting soldiers
    Michael W Ellis
    Department of Medicine Infectious Diseases, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 47:940-5. 2009
  5. pmc Targeted intranasal mupirocin to prevent colonization and infection by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in soldiers: a cluster randomized controlled trial
    Michael W Ellis
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 51:3591-8. 2007
  6. doi Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus blood and skin and soft tissue infections in the US military health system, 2005-2010
    Michael L Landrum
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    JAMA 308:50-9. 2012
  7. doi Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in wound cultures recovered from a combat support hospital in Iraq
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 69:S102-8. 2010
  8. doi Twenty-five year epidemiology of invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered at a burn center
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 35:1112-7. 2009
  9. ncbi Acinetobacter skin colonization of US Army Soldiers
    Matthew E Griffith
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 27:659-61. 2006
  10. pmc Efficacy of macrolides and telithromycin against leptospirosis in a hamster model
    James E Moon
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:1989-92. 2006

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. ncbi Is antimicrobial therapy needed to manage uncomplicated skin and soft-tissue abscesses?
    Michael W Ellis
    Infectious Disease Service, MCHE MDI, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 6:9-13. 2008
    ....
  2. ncbi Natural history of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in soldiers
    Michael W Ellis
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 6200, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 39:971-9. 2004
    ..Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging pathogen for which the prevalence, risk factors, and natural history are incompletely understood...
  3. ncbi Treatment approaches for community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections
    Michael W Ellis
    Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Curr Opin Infect Dis 18:496-501. 2005
    ....
  4. pmc Presence and molecular epidemiology of virulence factors in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains colonizing and infecting soldiers
    Michael W Ellis
    Department of Medicine Infectious Diseases, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 47:940-5. 2009
    ..Although various MRSA strains may colonize soldiers, USA300 is the most virulent when evaluated prospectively, and PVL, ACME, and type IV SCCmec are associated with these abscesses...
  5. pmc Targeted intranasal mupirocin to prevent colonization and infection by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in soldiers: a cluster randomized controlled trial
    Michael W Ellis
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Infectious Disease Service MCHE MDI, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 51:3591-8. 2007
    ..Furthermore, CA-MRSA eradication did not prevent new colonization within the study group...
  6. doi Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus blood and skin and soft tissue infections in the US military health system, 2005-2010
    Michael L Landrum
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    JAMA 308:50-9. 2012
    ..Rates of hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are reported as decreasing, but recent rates of community-onset S. aureus infections are less known...
  7. doi Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in wound cultures recovered from a combat support hospital in Iraq
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    J Trauma 69:S102-8. 2010
    ..aureus (CA-MRSA) strains seem to produce severe disease but retain susceptibility to many oral antimicrobials. This study characterizes 84 MRSA isolates recovered from wound cultures at a combat support hospital in Iraq...
  8. doi Twenty-five year epidemiology of invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered at a burn center
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Burns 35:1112-7. 2009
    ..Continued active surveillance and aggressive infection control strategies are recommended to prevent the spread of community-acquired MRSA to this burn unit...
  9. ncbi Acinetobacter skin colonization of US Army Soldiers
    Matthew E Griffith
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 27:659-61. 2006
    ..To evaluate whether skin colonization with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex exists in a population of healthy, nondeployed US Army soldiers and, if present, how it might relate to the infections seen in current war casualties...
  10. pmc Efficacy of macrolides and telithromycin against leptospirosis in a hamster model
    James E Moon
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:1989-92. 2006
    ..We conclude that all agents tested have demonstrated in vivo efficacy in treating acute leptospirosis. These results provide support for further evaluation of macrolide and ketolide antimicrobial agents in human trials...
  11. doi The expanding spectrum of eschar-associated rickettsioses in the United States
    W Chad Cragun
    Dermatology Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 2200 Bergquist Dr, Ste 1, Lackland AFB, TX 78236 9908, USA
    Arch Dermatol 146:641-8. 2010
    ..Rickettsia parkeri, originally thought to be nonpathogenic in humans, was recently proved to be another cause of tick-borne SFG rickettsiosis...
  12. ncbi Disseminated histoplasmosis in a patient with AIDS: case report and review of the literature
    Amy Y Paul
    Department of Dermatology, Evans Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, CO 80913, USA
    Cutis 80:309-12. 2007
    ....
  13. ncbi Activity of ceftobiprole against community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recently recovered from US military trainees
    Heather C Yun
    Department of Infectious Disease, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236, USA
    Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 59:463-6. 2007
    ..5 microg/mL (range, 0.25-0.5 microg/mL) with 29 methicillin-susceptible isolates recovered from military trainees during 2 prospective investigations...
  14. doi USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerging as a cause of bloodstream infections at military medical centers
    Jeffrey Sherwood
    Department of Medicine, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, El Paso, TX 79920, USA
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 34:393-9. 2013
    ..USA300 MRSA has emerged as an important cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection (BSI) in metropolitan centers...
  15. ncbi Susceptibility of Leptospira serovars to antimalarial agents
    Clinton K Murray
    Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 71:685-6. 2004
    ..The only agents identified with the potential to treat both infections other than doxycycline (MIC(90) = 1.56 microg/mL) were azithromycin (MIC(90) = 0.002 microg/mL) and clindamycin (MIC(90) = 0.2 microg/mL)...
  16. ncbi Comparison of short-course (5 days) and standard (10 days) treatment for uncomplicated cellulitis
    Matthew J Hepburn
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Tex, USA
    Arch Intern Med 164:1669-74. 2004
    ..Cellulitis is a condition routinely encountered in the primary care setting. No previous study has compared a short (5 days) vs standard (10 days) course of therapy of the same antibiotic in patients with uncomplicated cellulitis...
  17. doi Antimicrobial activity against CA-MRSA and treatment of uncomplicated nonpurulent cellulitis
    Matthew E Griffith
    Department of Medicine, F Edward Hebert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 11:777-80. 2013
    ..In this review, we examine the findings from a recent prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that refutes the need for empirical coverage of CA-MRSA when treating nonpurulent cellulitis. ..
  18. ncbi Necrotizing staphylococcal pneumonia in a neonate
    Ryan M McAdams
    Department of Pediatrics, Brooke Army Medical Center, Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, TX 78236, USA
    J Perinatol 25:677-9. 2005
    ..The severe course of this patient may be attributed to the presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, a well-known virulence factor leading to soft tissue and pulmonary infections...
  19. ncbi Coccidioidomycosis mimicking ovarian cancer
    Michael W Ellis
    Department of Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA
    Obstet Gynecol 104:1177-9. 2004
    ..Dissemination of coccidioidomycosis to the abdominal cavity is rare. No previous case of peritoneal coccidioidomycosis has presented as an adnexal mass...
  20. ncbi Approaches to serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin: clinical significance and options for management
    James S Lewis
    Department of Pharmacy, University Health System, San Antonio, Texas 78229 4493, USA
    Curr Opin Infect Dis 20:568-73. 2007
    ..This review addresses therapeutic approaches to Staphylococcus aureus infections with diminished susceptibility to vancomycin, focusing on recently published data in English language medical literature between June 2006 and July 2007...
  21. ncbi Acinetobacter nares colonization of healthy US soldiers
    Matthew E Griffith
    Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 27:787-8. 2006
  22. ncbi Alternative diagnoses that often mimic cellulitis
    Matthew J Hepburn
    Am Fam Physician 67:2471. 2003