Kent E Vrana

Summary

Affiliation: Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Embryonic stem cells from parthenotes
    Jose B Cibelli
    Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Methods Enzymol 418:117-35. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Nuclear proteomics and directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells
    Miguel Barthelery
    Department of Pharmacology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
    Stem Cells Dev 16:905-19. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Use of microarray technologies in toxicology research
    Kent E Vrana
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, 27157 1083, Winston Salem, NC, USA
    Neurotoxicology 24:321-32. 2003
  4. pmc Nonhuman primate parthenogenetic stem cells
    Kent E Vrana
    Center for Neurobehavioral Study of Alcohol, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:11911-6. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Extended cocaine self-administration and deprivation produces region-specific and time-dependent changes in connexin36 expression in rat brain
    Clinton B McCracken
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA
    Synapse 58:141-50. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Manganese-induced cytotoxicity in dopamine-producing cells
    Denise L Stredrick
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1083, USA
    Neurotoxicology 25:543-53. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Systematic screening of gene expression using a cDNA macroarray
    Travis J Worst
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA
    Methods Mol Med 79:243-59. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Repeated cocaine self-administration causes multiple changes in rat frontal cortex gene expression
    Willard M Freeman
    Center for the Neurobiological Investigation of Drug Abuse, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem NC 27157 1083, USA
    Neurochem Res 27:1181-92. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Transcriptome analysis of frontal cortex in alcohol-preferring and nonpreferring rats
    Travis J Worst
    Center for the Neurobehavioral Study of Alcohol, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    J Neurosci Res 80:529-38. 2005
  10. ncbi request reprint An interactive database of cocaine-responsive gene expression
    Willard M Freeman
    Center for the Neurobiological Investigation of Drug Abuse, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1083, USA
    ScientificWorldJournal 2:701-6. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. ncbi request reprint Embryonic stem cells from parthenotes
    Jose B Cibelli
    Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Methods Enzymol 418:117-35. 2006
    ..This chapter describes the biology underlying parthenogenesis, as well as provides detailed technical considerations for the production of pESCs...
  2. ncbi request reprint Nuclear proteomics and directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells
    Miguel Barthelery
    Department of Pharmacology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
    Stem Cells Dev 16:905-19. 2007
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Use of microarray technologies in toxicology research
    Kent E Vrana
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, 27157 1083, Winston Salem, NC, USA
    Neurotoxicology 24:321-32. 2003
    ....
  4. pmc Nonhuman primate parthenogenetic stem cells
    Kent E Vrana
    Center for Neurobehavioral Study of Alcohol, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:11911-6. 2003
    ..These results suggest that stem cells derived from the parthenogenetically activated nonhuman primate egg provide a potential source for autologous cell therapy in the female and bypass the need for creating a competent embryo...
  5. ncbi request reprint Extended cocaine self-administration and deprivation produces region-specific and time-dependent changes in connexin36 expression in rat brain
    Clinton B McCracken
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA
    Synapse 58:141-50. 2005
    ..These results suggest that changes in neuronal gap junction expression may be one mechanism by which cocaine self-administration produces enduring changes in behavior...
  6. ncbi request reprint Manganese-induced cytotoxicity in dopamine-producing cells
    Denise L Stredrick
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1083, USA
    Neurotoxicology 25:543-53. 2004
    ..In conclusion, DA content was not responsible for the enhanced sensitivity of CATH.a cells to Mn toxicity, but oxidative stress was implicated as a probable mechanism of cytotoxicity...
  7. ncbi request reprint Systematic screening of gene expression using a cDNA macroarray
    Travis J Worst
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA
    Methods Mol Med 79:243-59. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Repeated cocaine self-administration causes multiple changes in rat frontal cortex gene expression
    Willard M Freeman
    Center for the Neurobiological Investigation of Drug Abuse, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem NC 27157 1083, USA
    Neurochem Res 27:1181-92. 2002
    ..These changes share commonalities and exhibit differences with previous reports of gene expression changes in the frontal cortex after noncontingent cocaine administration...
  9. ncbi request reprint Transcriptome analysis of frontal cortex in alcohol-preferring and nonpreferring rats
    Travis J Worst
    Center for the Neurobehavioral Study of Alcohol, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    J Neurosci Res 80:529-38. 2005
    ..Such alterations, however, might not be a universal characteristic of all animal models of alcohol abuse and will also require further investigation in post-mortem human samples...
  10. ncbi request reprint An interactive database of cocaine-responsive gene expression
    Willard M Freeman
    Center for the Neurobiological Investigation of Drug Abuse, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1083, USA
    ScientificWorldJournal 2:701-6. 2002
    ..Furthermore, this method of organizing large volumes of scientific information can easily be adapted to assist researchers in fields outside of drug abuse...
  11. ncbi request reprint Alcohol and gene expression in the central nervous system
    Travis J Worst
    Center for the Neurobehavioral Study of Alcohol, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    Alcohol Alcohol 40:63-75. 2005
    ..To describe recent research focusing on the analysis of gene and protein expression relevant to understanding ethanol consumption, dependence and effects, in order to identify common themes...
  12. ncbi request reprint Functional genomic analysis in pain research using hybridization arrays
    Stephen J Walker
    Center for the Neurobiological Investigation of Drug Abuse and Neurobehavioral Study of Alcohol, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA
    Methods Mol Med 99:239-53. 2004
    ..The experimental description in this chapter explains, in detail, how to perform a hybridization array using the macroarray platform...
  13. ncbi request reprint Semiquantitative real-time PCR for analysis of mRNA levels
    Stephen J Walker
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA
    Methods Mol Med 79:211-27. 2003
  14. ncbi request reprint Induction of GADD45 and GADD153 in neuroblastoma cells by dopamine-induced toxicity
    Alan H Stokes
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Center for Neurobiological Investigation of Drug Abuse, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1083, USA
    Neurotoxicology 23:675-84. 2002
    ..Other genes that displayed changes, but that have not been subjected to post-hoc confirmation, include clusterin (increased), ubiquitin (increased), CD27 ligand (increased), CD27BP (increased), and rac-PK-beta (decreased)...
  15. ncbi request reprint Amphetamine withdrawal produces region-specific and time-dependent changes in connexin36 expression in rat brain
    Clinton B McCracken
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA
    Synapse 56:39-44. 2005
    ..This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of pharmacological manipulation of connexin36 in vivo...
  16. ncbi request reprint Effects of manganese (Mn) on the developing rat brain: oxidative-stress related endpoints
    Sarah Weber
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1083, USA
    Neurotoxicology 23:169-75. 2002
    ..05) total cerebrocortical GSH without accompanying changes in any of the other measured parameters. Therefore, it is unlikely that high dose Mn exposure is associated with oxidative stress in this experimental paradigm...
  17. ncbi request reprint Changes in rat frontal cortex gene expression following chronic cocaine
    Willard M Freeman
    Center for the Neurobiological Investigation of Drug Abuse, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1083, USA
    Brain Res Mol Brain Res 104:11-20. 2002
    ..This study also validates the use of hybridization arrays for screening of neuronal gene expression changes and the utility of relative protein quantification as a post-hoc confirmation tool...
  18. ncbi request reprint Parthenogenetic stem cells in nonhuman primates
    Jose B Cibelli
    Advanced Cell Technology, One Innovation Drive, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Science 295:819. 2002
  19. ncbi request reprint Glucocorticoids plus opioids up-regulate genes that influence neuronal function
    Gregg R Ward
    Neuroscience of Drug Abuse Research Program, Julius L Chambers Biomedical Biotechnology Research Institute, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707, USA
    Cell Mol Neurobiol 27:651-60. 2007
    ..Future studies are warranted to determine if combined influences of glucocorticoid fluctuations and opioid receptor stimulation in vivo can orchestrate exagerated neuroadaptation to reinforcing drugs under chronic mild stress conditions...
  20. doi request reprint Enhanced nuclear proteomics
    Miguel Barthelery
    Department of Pharmacology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, PA, USA
    Proteomics 8:1832-8. 2008
    ..This technique greatly improves electrofocusing efficacy and nearly doubles the number of detected protein spots. This approach to nuclear protein isolation for 2-D PAGE opens the door to better investigation of nuclear protein dynamics...
  21. ncbi request reprint Depletion of abundant proteins from non-human primate serum for biomarker studies
    Willard M Freeman
    Department of Pharmacology H078, Penn State College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
    Proteomics 6:3109-13. 2006
    ..Depleted serum also demonstrated greater sensitivity for previously masked, lower-abundance proteins...
  22. ncbi request reprint Apo-AII is an elevated biomarker of chronic non-human primate ethanol self-administration
    Willard M Freeman
    Department of Pharmacology, H078, Penn State College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033 0850, USA
    Alcohol Alcohol 41:300-5. 2006
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Analysis of cellular, transgenic and human models of Huntington's disease reveals tyrosine hydroxylase alterations and substantia nigra neuropathology
    George J Yohrling
    Department of Neurology, Center for Aging, Genetics, and Neurodegeneration, Massachusetts General Hospital, 114 16th Street, B114 2000, Charlestown, MA 02129 4404, USA
    Brain Res Mol Brain Res 119:28-36. 2003
    ..These findings implicate abnormalities in dopamine neurotransmission in HD and may provide new insights into targets for pharmacotherapy...
  24. ncbi request reprint Emerging techniques in biomedical research and their application to alcohol toxicity
    Vinood B Patel
    Department of Biochemistry and the Center for the Neurobehavioral Study of Alcohol, North Carolina, USA
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res 27:348-53. 2003
    ..Vrana; and (5) Adeno- and adeno-associated viral mediated gene transfer approaches for alcoholic liver disease, by Michael Wheeler. Concluding remarks were by Victor R. Preedy...
  25. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase activity and decreased 5-HT1A receptor binding in a mouse model of Huntington's disease
    George J Yohrling IV
    Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    J Neurochem 82:1416-23. 2002
    ..The presymptomatic inhibition of TPH activity in the R6/2 mice may help explain the functional consequences of HD and provide insights into new targets for pharmacotherapy...
  26. ncbi request reprint A monoclonal antibody to tryptophan hydroxylase: applications and identification of the epitope
    John W Haycock
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Medical Center, LSUHSC BIOCHEM, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA
    J Neurosci Methods 114:205-12. 2002
    ....
  27. doi request reprint Heroin self-administration: II. CNS gene expression following withdrawal and cue-induced drug-seeking behavior
    KARA L KUNTZ
    Department of Pharmacology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, R130, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
    Pharmacol Biochem Behav 90:349-56. 2008
    ..These latter observations of persistent changes in gene expression following abstinence may reflect molecular correlates of relapse liability...