W Andrew Yeudall

Summary

Affiliation: Virginia Commonwealth University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Gain-of-function mutant p53 upregulates CXC chemokines and enhances cell migration
    W Andrew Yeudall
    VCU Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Carcinogenesis 33:442-51. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Uncoupling of epidermal growth factor-dependent proliferation and invasion in a model of squamous carcinoma progression
    W Andrew Yeudall
    Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Oral Oncol 41:698-708. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Chemokines and squamous cancer of the head and neck: targets for therapeutic intervention?
    W Andrew Yeudall
    Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Philips Institute for Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 7:351-60. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Down-regulation of CXCL5 inhibits squamous carcinogenesis
    Hiroshi Miyazaki
    Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 0566, USA
    Cancer Res 66:4279-84. 2006
  5. doi request reprint Keratin down-regulation in vimentin-positive cancer cells is reversible by vimentin RNA interference, which inhibits growth and motility
    Rachel J Paccione
    Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 7:2894-903. 2008
  6. pmc EPS8 upregulates FOXM1 expression, enhancing cell growth and motility
    Huixin Wang
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 521 N 11th Street, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Carcinogenesis 31:1132-41. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Growth factor-sensitive molecular targets identified in primary and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma using microarray analysis
    Hiroshi Miyazaki
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, School of Dentistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, P O Box 980566, Room 424, 521 N 11th Street, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Oral Oncol 42:240-56. 2006
  8. doi request reprint Enhanced chemoresistance of squamous carcinoma cells grown in 3D cryogenic electrospun scaffolds
    Anna A Bulysheva
    VCU Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
    Biomed Mater 8:055009. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Roles of CXCL8 in squamous cell carcinoma proliferation and migration
    Emil P Christofakis
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Oral Oncol 44:920-6. 2008
  10. doi request reprint Role for EPS8 in squamous carcinogenesis
    Huixin Wang
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Carcinogenesis 30:165-74. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. doi request reprint Gain-of-function mutant p53 upregulates CXC chemokines and enhances cell migration
    W Andrew Yeudall
    VCU Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Carcinogenesis 33:442-51. 2012
    ..Finally, CXCL5 expression was also elevated in lung tumor samples containing GOF p53, indicating relevance to human cancer. The data suggest a mechanistic link between GOF p53 proteins and chemokines in enhanced cell motility...
  2. ncbi request reprint Uncoupling of epidermal growth factor-dependent proliferation and invasion in a model of squamous carcinoma progression
    W Andrew Yeudall
    Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Oral Oncol 41:698-708. 2005
    ..The data indicate that distinct biochemical differences distinguish metastatic squamous carcinoma cells from those derived from corresponding primary tumors, resulting in their contrasting biological properties...
  3. ncbi request reprint Chemokines and squamous cancer of the head and neck: targets for therapeutic intervention?
    W Andrew Yeudall
    Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Philips Institute for Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 7:351-60. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Down-regulation of CXCL5 inhibits squamous carcinogenesis
    Hiroshi Miyazaki
    Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 0566, USA
    Cancer Res 66:4279-84. 2006
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Keratin down-regulation in vimentin-positive cancer cells is reversible by vimentin RNA interference, which inhibits growth and motility
    Rachel J Paccione
    Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 7:2894-903. 2008
    ..The data suggest that reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype by inhibiting vimentin expression results in reexpression of epithelial characteristics and reduced tumor aggressiveness...
  6. pmc EPS8 upregulates FOXM1 expression, enhancing cell growth and motility
    Huixin Wang
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 521 N 11th Street, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Carcinogenesis 31:1132-41. 2010
    ..These data suggest that EPS8 enhances cell proliferation and migration in part by deregulating FOXM1 activity and inducing CXC-chemokine expression, mediated by PI3K- and AKT-dependent mechanisms...
  7. ncbi request reprint Growth factor-sensitive molecular targets identified in primary and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma using microarray analysis
    Hiroshi Miyazaki
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, School of Dentistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, P O Box 980566, Room 424, 521 N 11th Street, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Oral Oncol 42:240-56. 2006
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Enhanced chemoresistance of squamous carcinoma cells grown in 3D cryogenic electrospun scaffolds
    Anna A Bulysheva
    VCU Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
    Biomed Mater 8:055009. 2013
    ..In conclusion, an in vitro tumor model has been developed that will allow for a better understanding of tumor biology and aid chemotherapeutic drug development and accurate evaluation of drug efficacy...
  9. doi request reprint Roles of CXCL8 in squamous cell carcinoma proliferation and migration
    Emil P Christofakis
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Oral Oncol 44:920-6. 2008
    ..Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that CXCL8 affects multiple processes involved in tumor progression and identify CXCL8 as a potential therapeutic target, similar to CXCL5...
  10. doi request reprint Role for EPS8 in squamous carcinogenesis
    Huixin Wang
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 0566, USA
    Carcinogenesis 30:165-74. 2009
    ..Furthermore, EPS8 expression in clinical samples of squamous cell carcinoma showed variable expression levels and broadly paralleled expression of MMP-9. The data support a role for EPS8 in squamous carcinogenesis...
  11. doi request reprint VEGF-C contributes to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma growth and motility
    Emily M Benke
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Oral Oncol 46:e19-24. 2010
    ..Finally, determination of VEGF-C expression in squamous carcinoma cell lines revealed universal overexpression compared to normal keratinocytes. These findings support a role for VEGF-C in head and neck squamous cell carcinogenesis...
  12. doi request reprint Mutant p53 in cell adhesion and motility
    W Andrew Yeudall
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, School of Dentistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 962:135-46. 2013
    ..Furthermore, stable transfection of mutant p53-H179L into NIH3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to allow anchorage-independent growth in soft agar...
  13. pmc Docking and hydropathic scoring of polysubstituted pyrrole compounds with antitubulin activity
    Ashutosh Tripathi
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Institute for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 0540, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem 16:2235-42. 2008
    ..These results illuminate the binding process and should be valuable in the design of new pyrrole-based colchicine site inhibitors as these compounds have very accessible syntheses...
  14. pmc Gain-of-Function Activity of Mutant p53 in Lung Cancer through Up-Regulation of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinase Axl
    Catherine A Vaughan
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    Genes Cancer 3:491-502. 2012
    ..This indicates that for lung cancer cell lines with mutant p53, GOF activities are mediated in part through Axl...
  15. pmc PEGylated polyamidoamine dendrimers with bis-aryl hydrazone linkages for enhanced gene delivery
    Quan Yuan
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, School of Dentistry, and Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284, USA
    Biomacromolecules 11:1940-7. 2010
    ..This work demonstrates that the use of the BAH linkage in coupling of PEG to the dendrimer helps maintain or increase the buffering capacity of the functionalized dendrimer and results in enhanced transfection...
  16. pmc Semi-interpenetrating network (sIPN) gelatin nanofiber scaffolds for oral mucosal drug delivery
    Donald C Aduba
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
    Acta Biomater 9:6576-84. 2013
    ..Slow release of nystatin, an anti-fungal reagent, from the sIPN gelatin nanofiber scaffold was demonstrated...
  17. pmc Low-temperature electrospun silk scaffold for in vitro mucosal modeling
    Anna A Bulysheva
    VCU Philips Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 100:757-67. 2012
    ....
  18. pmc Dendrimer-triglycine-EGF nanoparticles for tumor imaging and targeted nucleic acid and drug delivery
    Quan Yuan
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
    Oral Oncol 46:698-704. 2010
    ..Significant knockdown of expression was observed, indicating that this vector is useful for introduction of nucleic acids or drugs into cells by a receptor-targeted mechanism...
  19. pmc Autophagic cell death, polyploidy and senescence induced in breast tumor cells by the substituted pyrrole JG-03-14, a novel microtubule poison
    Christopher R Arthur
    Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Biochem Pharmacol 74:981-91. 2007
    ....
  20. pmc Chemokines, chemokine receptors and the gastrointestinal system
    Hiroshi Miyazaki
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    World J Gastroenterol 19:2847-63. 2013
    ..In this review, we will summarize recently reported findings in chemokine biology with a focus on the gastrointestinal tract...
  21. pmc Human Oncoprotein MDM2 Up-regulates Expression of NF-κB2 Precursor p100 Conferring a Survival Advantage to Lung Cells
    Catherine Vaughan
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    Genes Cancer 2:943-55. 2011
    ..Based on these data, we propose that MDM2-mediated NF-κB2 up-regulation is a combined effect of p53-dependent and independent mechanisms and that it confers a survival advantage to lung cancer cells...
  22. ncbi request reprint Inability of transforming growth factor-beta to cause SnoN degradation leads to resistance to transforming growth factor-beta-induced growth arrest in esophageal cancer cells
    Jeffery S Edmiston
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23298 0678, USA
    Cancer Res 65:4782-8. 2005
    ..In addition, they show that SnoN can block TGF-beta repression of gene transcription...
  23. pmc Surface engineering of macrophages with nanoparticles to generate a cell-nanoparticle hybrid vehicle for hypoxia-targeted drug delivery
    Christopher A Holden
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
    Int J Nanomedicine 5:25-36. 2010
    ..The distribution of nanoparticles on the cell surface was confirmed by fluorescence imaging, and it was found to be dependent on the stability of the linkages coupling nanoparticles to the cell surface...
  24. pmc Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis FeoB2 in metal uptake and oxidative stress protection
    Jia He
    Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, School of Dentistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, P O Box 980566, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Infect Immun 74:4214-23. 2006
    ..Furthermore, we show that FeoB2 and acquisition of manganese are required for intracellular survival of P. gingivalis in host cells...
  25. ncbi request reprint Dissecting the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling network: emerging results from the head and neck cancer tissue array initiative
    Alfredo A Molinolo
    Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 4330, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 13:4964-73. 2007
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Aberrant p53 alters DNA damage checkpoints in response to cisplatin: downregulation of CDK expression and activity
    Katharine H Wrighton
    Head and Neck Cancer Program, King s College London, London, United Kingdom
    Int J Cancer 112:760-70. 2004
    ..These data suggest that dominant-negative p53 can influence the expression and activity of CDK complexes, thereby modifying cell behavior following cisplatin-induced genotoxicity...
  27. ncbi request reprint Accelerated cell cycle progression in osteoblasts overexpressing the c-fos proto-oncogene: induction of cyclin A and enhanced CDK2 activity
    Andrew Sunters
    Department of Craniofacial Development, King s College London, Guy s Hospital, Guy s Tower, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 279:9882-91. 2004
    ..This represents a novel role for c-Fos in osteoblast growth control and may provide c-Fos-overexpressing osteoblasts with a growth advantage during tumorigenesis...
  28. ncbi request reprint Laminin-gamma2 overexpression in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma
    Vyomesh Patel
    Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Int J Cancer 99:583-8. 2002
    ..The data indicate that laminin-gamma2 is frequently overexpressed in HNSCCs and derivative cell lines and that its overexpression is likely to be useful as a marker of head-and-neck squamous malignancy...