Brion S Maher

Summary

Affiliation: Virginia Commonwealth University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc An ordered subset approach to including covariates in the transmission disequilibrium test
    Hervé Perdry
    INSERM U535, BP 1000, Villejuif, 94817, France
    BMC Proc 1:S77. 2007
  2. doi Allelic heterogeneity in genetic association meta-analysis: an application to DTNBP1 and schizophrenia
    Brion S Maher
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 0126, USA
    Hum Hered 69:71-9. 2010
  3. pmc The trace amine associated receptor (TAAR6) gene is not associated with schizophrenia in the Irish Case-Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample
    Vladimir I Vladimirov
    Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 East Leigh Street, Biotech 1 110, Richmond VA 23298, USA
    Schizophr Res 107:249-54. 2009
  4. pmc The dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1) gene is associated with schizophrenia in the Irish Case Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample
    Brien Riley
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    Schizophr Res 115:245-53. 2009
  5. pmc Comprehensive gene-based association study of a chromosome 20 linked region implicates novel risk loci for depressive symptoms in psychotic illness
    T Bernard Bigdeli
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e21440. 2011
  6. pmc Meta-analyses of genome-wide linkage scans of anxiety-related phenotypes
    Bradley T Webb
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 20:1078-84. 2012
  7. pmc Prioritization and association analysis of murine-derived candidate genes in anxiety-spectrum disorders
    John M Hettema
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 0126, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 70:888-96. 2011
  8. pmc Detection of susceptibility genes as modifiers due to subgroup differences in complex disease
    Sarah E Bergen
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 18:960-4. 2010
  9. pmc Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes are not major risk factors for polycystic ovary syndrome
    Lori D Hill
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Mol Cell Endocrinol 350:72-7. 2012
  10. pmc MEGF10 association with schizophrenia
    Xiangning Chen
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavior Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 63:441-8. 2008

Research Grants

Detail Information

Publications37

  1. pmc An ordered subset approach to including covariates in the transmission disequilibrium test
    Hervé Perdry
    INSERM U535, BP 1000, Villejuif, 94817, France
    BMC Proc 1:S77. 2007
    ..For a third locus, detectable by the classical transmission-disequilibrium test, a substantial increase of power of detection is shown...
  2. doi Allelic heterogeneity in genetic association meta-analysis: an application to DTNBP1 and schizophrenia
    Brion S Maher
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 0126, USA
    Hum Hered 69:71-9. 2010
    ..We contend that current approaches may obscure interesting phenomena in genetic association data. However, an appropriate approach to examining heterogeneity across studies is lacking...
  3. pmc The trace amine associated receptor (TAAR6) gene is not associated with schizophrenia in the Irish Case-Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample
    Vladimir I Vladimirov
    Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 East Leigh Street, Biotech 1 110, Richmond VA 23298, USA
    Schizophr Res 107:249-54. 2009
    ..0564 (1.0078-1.1074); p=0.02], while nominally significant, did not survive correction for multiple testing. Here we demonstrate that TAAR6 is not associated with schizophrenia in the ICCSS sample...
  4. pmc The dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1) gene is associated with schizophrenia in the Irish Case Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample
    Brien Riley
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    Schizophr Res 115:245-53. 2009
    ..DTNBP1 is associated with schizophrenia in many studies, but the associated alleles and haplotypes vary between samples...
  5. pmc Comprehensive gene-based association study of a chromosome 20 linked region implicates novel risk loci for depressive symptoms in psychotic illness
    T Bernard Bigdeli
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e21440. 2011
    ..Prior genomewide scans of schizophrenia support evidence of linkage to regions of chromosome 20. However, association analyses have yet to provide support for any etiologically relevant variants...
  6. pmc Meta-analyses of genome-wide linkage scans of anxiety-related phenotypes
    Bradley T Webb
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 20:1078-84. 2012
    ..This may prove useful for prioritizing emerging genome-wide association data for anxiety disorders...
  7. pmc Prioritization and association analysis of murine-derived candidate genes in anxiety-spectrum disorders
    John M Hettema
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 0126, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 70:888-96. 2011
    ....
  8. pmc Detection of susceptibility genes as modifiers due to subgroup differences in complex disease
    Sarah E Bergen
    Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 18:960-4. 2010
    ..This may explain some of the inconsistent association results for many candidate gene studies of complex diseases...
  9. pmc Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes are not major risk factors for polycystic ovary syndrome
    Lori D Hill
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Mol Cell Endocrinol 350:72-7. 2012
    ..Our findings suggest that common variants and haplotypes of the COMT gene are not major contributors to risk for PCOS, but that COMT genotype may influence prolactin levels...
  10. pmc MEGF10 association with schizophrenia
    Xiangning Chen
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavior Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 63:441-8. 2008
    ..In this study, we carried out independent replication and expression studies of the MEGF10 gene...
  11. doi The AVPR1A gene and substance use disorders: association, replication, and functional evidence
    Brion S Maher
    Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 70:519-27. 2011
    ..The liability to addiction has been shown to be highly genetically correlated across drug classes, suggesting nondrug-specific mechanisms...
  12. ncbi Genome survey for loci that influence successful aging: results at 10-cM resolution
    George S Zubenko
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, PA, USA
    Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 15:184-93. 2007
    ..A systematic genome survey was initiated to identify loci that affect the likelihood of reaching age 90 with preserved cognition (successful aging)...
  13. ncbi Genome-wide linkage survey for genetic loci that affect the risk of suicide attempts in families with recurrent, early-onset, major depression
    George S Zubenko
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 129:47-54. 2004
    ....
  14. ncbi Genetic linkage of region containing the CREB1 gene to depressive disorders in women from families with recurrent, early-onset, major depression
    George S Zubenko
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USA
    Am J Med Genet 114:980-7. 2002
    ..The sex-specificity of the susceptibility locus identified by our study may result from reported synergistic interactions of CREB with nuclear estrogen receptors...
  15. ncbi Reduced age-related cataracts among elderly persons who reach age 90 with preserved cognition: a biomarker of successful aging?
    George S Zubenko
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USA
    J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 62:500-6. 2007
    ..Our findings suggest that the progressive development of lens opacities may be reflective of degenerative events occurring more generally throughout the body...
  16. ncbi Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene variants and the risk of isolated cleft lip or palate
    Theresa M Zucchero
    University of Iowa, Iowa City 52242, USA
    N Engl J Med 351:769-80. 2004
    ..We searched for a specific genetic factor contributing to this complex trait by examining large numbers of affected patients and families and evaluating a specific candidate gene...
  17. ncbi Idiopathic congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: analysis of genes pertinent to early autonomic nervous system embryologic development and identification of mutations in PHOX2b
    Debra E Weese-Mayer
    Department of Pediatrics, Rush Children s Hospital at Rush Presbyterian St Luke s Medical Center, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 123:267-78. 2003
    ....
  18. pmc Minor physical anomalies in schizophrenia: a meta-analysis
    Seth M Weinberg
    Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA
    Schizophr Res 89:72-85. 2007
    ..05), although the pooled odds ratios for these regions did not differ significantly from one another. These results suggest a lack of regional specificity for MPAs in schizophrenia...
  19. ncbi Genetic analysis of candidate loci in non-syndromic cleft lip families from Antioquia-Colombia and Ohio
    Lina M Moreno
    Dows Institute for Dental Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 125:135-44. 2004
    ..This article contains supplementary material, which may be viewed at the American Journal of Medical Genetics website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0148-7299/suppmat/index.html...
  20. ncbi Sudden infant death syndrome: Case-control frequency differences in paired like homeobox (PHOX) 2B gene
    Casey M Rand
    Department of Pediatrics, Rush Children s Hospital at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 140:1687-91. 2006
  21. ncbi Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in China: assessment of candidate regions
    Mary L Marazita
    Division of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 1931, USA
    Cleft Palate Craniofac J 39:149-56. 2002
    ..Therefore, the objective of this study of Chinese families was to evaluate linkage and association between CL/P and 10 genetic markers in five chromosomal regions that have shown positive results in Caucasians...
  22. ncbi 3' UTR polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene and sudden infant death syndrome: haplotype analysis
    Brion S Maher
    Am J Med Genet A 140:1453-7. 2006
  23. ncbi Sudden infant death syndrome: association with a promoter polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene
    Debra E Weese-Mayer
    Department of Pediatrics, Rush University, Rush Children s Hospital at Rush Presbyterian St Luke s Medical Center, 1653 West Congress Parkway, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 117:268-74. 2003
    ....
  24. ncbi Association of the serotonin transporter gene with sudden infant death syndrome: a haplotype analysis
    Debra E Weese-Mayer
    Department of Pediatrics, Rush Children s Hospital at Rush Presbyterian St Luke s Medical Center, Rush University, 1653 West Congress Parkway, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 122:238-45. 2003
    ....
  25. doi Three-dimensional morphometric analysis of craniofacial shape in the unaffected relatives of individuals with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts: a possible marker for genetic susceptibility
    Seth M Weinberg
    Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 146:409-20. 2008
    ..These findings further suggest that a quantitative assessment of the craniofacial phenotype may allow for the identification of susceptible individuals within nonsyndromic cleft families...
  26. ncbi Orbicularis oris muscle defects as an expanded phenotypic feature in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate
    Katherine Neiswanger
    Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, and Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 143:1143-9. 2007
    ..Furthermore, the expansion of the cleft lip+/-cleft palate phenotypic spectrum should improve the power of genetic studies...
  27. pmc Genome scan for loci involved in cleft lip with or without cleft palate, in Chinese multiplex families
    Mary L Marazita
    Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, Division of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3501 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 71:349-64. 2002
    ..0; alpha=0.37) were for chromosomes 3q and 4q. Associations with P< or =.05 were found for loci on chromosomes 3, 5-7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 20, and 21. The most significant association result (P=.009) was found with D16S769 (51 cM)...
  28. ncbi Genetic segregation analysis of alcohol and other substance-use disorders in families with recurrent, early-onset major depression
    Brion S Maher
    Division of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, School of Dental Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 28:711-31. 2002
    ..The goal of this study was to conduct a complex segregation analysis of alcohol and other substance-use disorders in families identified by probands with recurrent, early-onset major depression (RE-MDD)...
  29. ncbi Liability to substance use disorders: 1. Common mechanisms and manifestations
    Michael M Vanyukov
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research, University of Pittsburgh, 707 Salk Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 27:507-15. 2003
    ..An accompanying paper describes an approach to the quantitative estimation of this trait...
  30. ncbi Haplotypes of the monoamine oxidase genes and the risk for substance use disorders
    Michael M Vanyukov
    Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA
    Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 125:120-5. 2004
    ..Overall, our results, albeit not definitive, are consistent with the hypothesis that variants in MAOA account for a small portion of the variance of SUD risk, possibly mediated by liability to early onset behavioral problems...
  31. pmc Meta-analysis of 13 genome scans reveals multiple cleft lip/palate genes with novel loci on 9q21 and 2q32-35
    Mary L Marazita
    Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, Division of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 75:161-73. 2004
    ..0004). These are the first genomewide significant linkage results ever reported for CL/P, and they represent an unprecedented demonstration of the power of linkage analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder...
  32. ncbi Sudden infant death syndrome: case-control frequency differences at genes pertinent to early autonomic nervous system embryologic development
    Debra E Weese-Mayer
    Department of Pediatrics, Rush Children s Hospital at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Pediatr Res 56:391-5. 2004
    ..These data represent further refinement of the genetic profile that might place an infant at risk for SIDS...
  33. ncbi Facial phenotype in children and young adults with PHOX2B-determined congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: quantitative pattern of dysmorphology
    Emily S Todd
    Department of Pediatrics, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA
    Pediatr Res 59:39-45. 2006
    ..These results suggest a characteristic facial phenotype in children and young adults with CCHS, due to an expansion mutation in PHOX2B...
  34. ncbi Approaches to detecting gene x gene interaction in Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 pedigrees
    Brion S Maher
    Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219, USA
    Genet Epidemiol 29:S116-9. 2005
    ..Overall, most of the groups found limited success in consistently detecting all of the simulated interactions due, in large part, to the nature of the generating model...
  35. ncbi Nicotine metabolizing genes GSTT1 and CYP1A1 in sudden infant death syndrome
    Casey M Rand
    Department of Pediatrics, Rush Children s Hospital at Rush University Medical Center, 1653 West Congress Parkway, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 140:1447-52. 2006
    ..A prospective study of SIDS cases with nicotine exposure history is necessary to resolve the relationship between nicotine metabolizing genes and SIDS...
  36. pmc Impaired FGF signaling contributes to cleft lip and palate
    Bridget M Riley
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:4512-7. 2007
    ..The data suggest that the FGF signaling pathway may contribute to as much as 3-5% of NS CLP and will be a consideration in the clinical management of CLP...
  37. ncbi Genetic segregation analysis of recurrent, early-onset major depression: evidence for single major locus transmission
    Brion S Maher
    Division of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, School of Dental Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Am J Med Genet 114:214-21. 2002
    ..Our findings illustrate the advantage of employing families identified by probands with RE-MDD in studies designed to detect susceptibility loci for unipolar MDD and related disorders...

Research Grants2

  1. Statistical Genetic Analysis of Orofacial Cleft Families
    Brion Maher; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Overall, the proposed analytical approaches applied in this large dataset will shed significant light on the contribution of specific genes, and their interactions, to CUP. ..