Kevin C Ess

Summary

Affiliation: Vanderbilt University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Zebrafish model of tuberous sclerosis complex reveals cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of mutant tuberin
    Seok Hyung Kim
    Vanderbilt University, Department of Biological Sciences, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Dis Model Mech 4:255-67. 2011
  2. pmc Heterozygous inactivation of tsc2 enhances tumorigenesis in p53 mutant zebrafish
    Seok Hyung Kim
    Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Dis Model Mech 6:925-33. 2013
  3. pmc Patient heal thyself: modeling and treating neurological disorders using patient-derived stem cells
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt Center for Stem Cell Biology, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 238:308-14. 2013
  4. ncbi The neurobiology of tuberous sclerosis complex
    Kevin C Ess
    Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Semin Pediatr Neurol 13:37-42. 2006
  5. pmc Tuberous sclerosis complex: everything old is new again
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic, Vanderbilt Children s Hospital, Vanderbilt University, 2201 West End Avenue, Nashville, TN, 37240, USA
    J Neurodev Disord 1:141-9. 2009
  6. pmc Tuberous sclerosis complex: a brave new world?
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
    Curr Opin Neurol 23:189-93. 2010
  7. pmc Abnormal glutamate homeostasis and impaired synaptic plasticity and learning in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex
    Ling Hui Zeng
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neurobiol Dis 28:184-96. 2007
  8. ncbi Expression profiling in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) knockout mouse astrocytes to characterize human TSC brain pathology
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Glia 46:28-40. 2004
  9. ncbi Developmental origin of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in tuberous sclerosis complex
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neurology 64:1446-9. 2005
  10. pmc Cystogenesis and elongated primary cilia in Tsc1-deficient distal convoluted tubules
    Eric A Armour
    Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA
    Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 303:F584-92. 2012

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. pmc Zebrafish model of tuberous sclerosis complex reveals cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of mutant tuberin
    Seok Hyung Kim
    Vanderbilt University, Department of Biological Sciences, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Dis Model Mech 4:255-67. 2011
    ..The finding of a non-cell-autonomous function of mutant cells might help explain the formation of brain hamartomas and cortical malformations in human TSC...
  2. pmc Heterozygous inactivation of tsc2 enhances tumorigenesis in p53 mutant zebrafish
    Seok Hyung Kim
    Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Dis Model Mech 6:925-33. 2013
    ....
  3. pmc Patient heal thyself: modeling and treating neurological disorders using patient-derived stem cells
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt Center for Stem Cell Biology, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 238:308-14. 2013
    ..While this field is in its infancy, expected advances and needed breakthroughs point to a future where patient-derived stem cells will be the basis for the emerging discipline of regenerative neurology...
  4. ncbi The neurobiology of tuberous sclerosis complex
    Kevin C Ess
    Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Semin Pediatr Neurol 13:37-42. 2006
    ..This review will summarize recent progress and suggest future avenues of basic science research...
  5. pmc Tuberous sclerosis complex: everything old is new again
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic, Vanderbilt Children s Hospital, Vanderbilt University, 2201 West End Avenue, Nashville, TN, 37240, USA
    J Neurodev Disord 1:141-9. 2009
    ..Finally, promising new approaches for the treatment of epilepsy and autism in patients with TSC as well as those in the general population will be discussed...
  6. pmc Tuberous sclerosis complex: a brave new world?
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
    Curr Opin Neurol 23:189-93. 2010
    ..During the last year, there have been enormous advances in basic and translational research pertaining to TSC...
  7. pmc Abnormal glutamate homeostasis and impaired synaptic plasticity and learning in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex
    Ling Hui Zeng
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neurobiol Dis 28:184-96. 2007
    ..These results suggest that abnormal glutamate homeostasis predisposes to excitotoxic cell death, impaired synaptic plasticity and learning deficits in Tsc1 GFAP CKO mice...
  8. ncbi Expression profiling in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) knockout mouse astrocytes to characterize human TSC brain pathology
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Glia 46:28-40. 2004
    ....
  9. ncbi Developmental origin of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in tuberous sclerosis complex
    Kevin C Ess
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neurology 64:1446-9. 2005
    ..These results suggest that both tubers and SEGAs result from related defects in progenitor cell differentiation during brain development...
  10. pmc Cystogenesis and elongated primary cilia in Tsc1-deficient distal convoluted tubules
    Eric A Armour
    Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA
    Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 303:F584-92. 2012
    ..This cytogenesis appears to be mTORC1 but not mTORC2 dependent. Intriguingly, the mechanism may be cell autonomous as well as non-cell autonomous and possibly involves the length and function of primary cilia...
  11. pmc Neuronal and glia abnormalities in Tsc1-deficient forebrain and partial rescue by rapamycin
    Robert P Carson
    Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Neurobiol Dis 45:369-80. 2012
    ..The dramatic effect of rapamycin suggests that even with extensive multi-lineage abnormalities, a postnatal therapeutic window may exist for patients with TSC...
  12. pmc Deletion of Rictor in neural progenitor cells reveals contributions of mTORC2 signaling to tuberous sclerosis complex
    Robert P Carson
    Department of Neurology, Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 8552, USA
    Hum Mol Genet 22:140-52. 2013
    ..Loss of mTORC2 signaling in the cortex independent of mTORC1 can disrupt normal brain development and function and may contribute to some of the neurologic manifestations seen in TSC...
  13. pmc Conditional and domain-specific inactivation of the Tsc2 gene in neural progenitor cells
    Cary Fu
    Division of Child Neurology and Epilepsy, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA
    Genesis 51:284-92. 2013
    ..This novel animal model will allow further study of tuberin function including the requirement of the GAP domain for protein stability...
  14. pmc DMH1, a highly selective small molecule BMP inhibitor promotes neurogenesis of hiPSCs: comparison of PAX6 and SOX1 expression during neural induction
    M Diana Neely
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 8552, USA
    ACS Chem Neurosci 3:482-91. 2012
    ....
  15. pmc Multi-organ abnormalities and mTORC1 activation in zebrafish model of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency
    Seok Hyung Kim
    Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
    PLoS Genet 9:e1003563. 2013
    ..Altered mTORC1 signaling and maternal nutritional status may play critical roles in MADD disease progression and suggest novel treatment approaches that may ameliorate disease severity...
  16. ncbi Impaired glial glutamate transport in a mouse tuberous sclerosis epilepsy model
    Michael Wong
    Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Ann Neurol 54:251-6. 2003
    ..These findings suggest that Tsc1 inactivation in astrocytes causes dysfunctional glutamate homeostasis, leading to seizure development in TSC...
  17. pmc GABAergic interneuron development and function is modulated by the Tsc1 gene
    Cary Fu
    Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    Cereb Cortex 22:2111-9. 2012
    ..These findings support an important role for the Tsc1 gene during GABAergic interneuron development, function, and possibly migration...

Research Grants2

  1. The Role of TSC Genes During Brain Development
    Kevin Ess; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..These findings will likely have broad therapeutic implications for individuals with TSC as well as non-TSC patients with seizure disorders and autism. ..