K D Young

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Dakota
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bacterial shape
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    Mol Microbiol 49:571-80. 2003
  2. pmc FtsZ collaborates with penicillin binding proteins to generate bacterial cell shape in Escherichia coli
    Archana Varma
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:6768-74. 2004
  3. pmc The selective value of bacterial shape
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 70:660-703. 2006
  4. pmc Reforming L forms: they need part of a wall after all?
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:6509-11. 2007
  5. pmc Bacterial morphology: why have different shapes?
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 10:596-600. 2007
  6. pmc Why spherical Escherichia coli dies: the inside story
    Kevin D Young
    Mailing address Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 190:1497-8. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Approaching the physiological functions of penicillin-binding proteins in Escherichia coli
    K D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    Biochimie 83:99-102. 2001
  8. pmc Escherichia coli mutants lacking all possible combinations of eight penicillin binding proteins: viability, characteristics, and implications for peptidoglycan synthesis
    S A Denome
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 181:3981-93. 1999
  9. pmc AmpC and AmpH, proteins related to the class C beta-lactamases, bind penicillin and contribute to the normal morphology of Escherichia coli
    T A Henderson
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 179:6112-21. 1997
  10. pmc Separation of Escherichia coli penicillin-binding proteins into different membrane vesicles by agarose electrophoresis and sizing chromatography
    M J Leidenix
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202
    J Bacteriol 171:5680-6. 1989

Collaborators

  • Kerwyn Casey Huang
  • D E Nelson
  • C Oldfield
  • M B Schmid
  • Waldemar Vollmer
  • DAVID POPHAM
  • Trine Nilsen
  • Archana Varma
  • Anindya S Ghosh
  • Richa Priyadarshini
  • Miguel A de Pedro
  • T A Henderson
  • Bernadette M Meberg
  • Lakshmiprasad Potluri
  • S A Denome
  • Claude V Gallant
  • Shi Yan Li
  • Joachim Volker Höltje
  • Frances C Sailer
  • B M Meberg
  • Jean Marc Wilkin
  • Martine Nguyen-Distèche
  • Jolanda Verheul
  • Aneta Karczmarek
  • Nadine Werth
  • Tanneke Den Blaauwen
  • Andre Piette
  • Manuel Banzhaf
  • P K Elf
  • Amy L Melquist
  • Lakshmi P Kotra
  • Jacqueline M Leung
  • Craig Daniels
  • Lori L Burrows
  • Avery L Paulson
  • Heinz Schwarz
  • P M Dombrosky
  • F C Sailer
  • S M Horne
  • G H Jacoby
  • M Templin
  • L J Nash
  • D C Stanley
  • E S Olson
  • M J Leidenix
  • J K Powell

Detail Information

Publications42

  1. ncbi request reprint Bacterial shape
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    Mol Microbiol 49:571-80. 2003
    ....
  2. pmc FtsZ collaborates with penicillin binding proteins to generate bacterial cell shape in Escherichia coli
    Archana Varma
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:6768-74. 2004
    ....
  3. pmc The selective value of bacterial shape
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 70:660-703. 2006
    ..Just as we are beginning to answer how bacteria create their shapes, it seems reasonable and essential that we expand our efforts to understand why they do so...
  4. pmc Reforming L forms: they need part of a wall after all?
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:6509-11. 2007
  5. pmc Bacterial morphology: why have different shapes?
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 10:596-600. 2007
    ..In short, if a bacterium needs to eat, divide or survive, or if it needs to attach, move or differentiate, then it can benefit from adopting an appropriate shape...
  6. pmc Why spherical Escherichia coli dies: the inside story
    Kevin D Young
    Mailing address Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 190:1497-8. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Approaching the physiological functions of penicillin-binding proteins in Escherichia coli
    K D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    Biochimie 83:99-102. 2001
    ....
  8. pmc Escherichia coli mutants lacking all possible combinations of eight penicillin binding proteins: viability, characteristics, and implications for peptidoglycan synthesis
    S A Denome
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 181:3981-93. 1999
    ..In addition, members of the set of PBP mutants will provide excellent starting points for answering fundamental questions about other aspects of cell wall metabolism...
  9. pmc AmpC and AmpH, proteins related to the class C beta-lactamases, bind penicillin and contribute to the normal morphology of Escherichia coli
    T A Henderson
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 179:6112-21. 1997
    ..These traits suggest that AmpC and AmpH may play roles in the normal course of peptidoglycan synthesis, remodeling, or recycling...
  10. pmc Separation of Escherichia coli penicillin-binding proteins into different membrane vesicles by agarose electrophoresis and sizing chromatography
    M J Leidenix
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202
    J Bacteriol 171:5680-6. 1989
    ..coli which is not observed when membrane vesicles are separated solely on the basis of density in sucrose gradients...
  11. pmc Reconstruction of Escherichia coli mrcA (PBP 1a) mutants lacking multiple combinations of penicillin binding proteins
    B M Meberg
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 183:6148-9. 2001
    ....
  12. pmc Contributions of PBP 5 and DD-carboxypeptidase penicillin binding proteins to maintenance of cell shape in Escherichia coli
    D E Nelson
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 183:3055-64. 2001
    ..coli...
  13. pmc Unequal distribution of penicillin-binding proteins among inner membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli
    G H Jacoby
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202
    J Bacteriol 170:3660-7. 1988
    ..In addition, in cell lysates and in vesicle fractions, a 60,000-dalton aztreonam-insensitive PBP or protein fragment was observed which could potentially be confused with PBP3...
  14. pmc Lysis of Escherichia coli by beta-lactams which bind penicillin-binding proteins 1a and 1b: inhibition by heat shock proteins
    J K Powell
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202
    J Bacteriol 173:4021-6. 1991
    ..Since many environmental stresses promote the expression of HSPs, it is possible that their presence contributes an additional mechanism toward development in bacteria of phenotypic tolerance to beta-lactam antibiotics...
  15. pmc Penicillin binding protein 5 affects cell diameter, contour, and morphology of Escherichia coli
    D E Nelson
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 182:1714-21. 2000
    ..We conclude that among the low-molecular-weight PBPs, PBP 5 plays a principle role in determining cell diameter, surface uniformity, and overall topology of the peptidoglycan sacculus...
  16. pmc Artifactual processing of penicillin-binding proteins 7 and 1b by the OmpT protease of Escherichia coli
    T A Henderson
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9001
    J Bacteriol 176:256-9. 1994
    ..The degradation of other PBPs during purification or storage may also be effected by OmpT...
  17. pmc Identification and cloning of the gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 7 of Escherichia coli
    T A Henderson
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 177:2074-9. 1995
    ..coli. No obvious growth defects were observed, suggesting that PBP 7 is not essential for growth under normal laboratory conditions...
  18. pmc Contribution of membrane-binding and enzymatic domains of penicillin binding protein 5 to maintenance of uniform cellular morphology of Escherichia coli
    David E Nelson
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 184:3630-9. 2002
    ....
  19. pmc Cell cycle-independent lysis of Escherichia coli by cefsulodin, an inhibitor of penicillin-binding proteins 1a and 1b
    G H Jacoby
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202
    J Bacteriol 173:1-5. 1991
    ..Thus, cefsulodin-induced lysis is not linked to septation or to any other cell cycle-related event...
  20. pmc Sequences near the active site in chimeric penicillin binding proteins 5 and 6 affect uniform morphology of Escherichia coli
    Anindya S Ghosh
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 185:2178-86. 2003
    ..coli PBP 5...
  21. pmc The Min system as a general cell geometry detection mechanism: branch lengths in Y-shaped Escherichia coli cells affect Min oscillation patterns and division dynamics
    Archana Varma
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 190:2106-17. 2008
    ..The results provide further evidence that Min protein oscillations act as a general cell geometry detection mechanism that can locate poles even in branched cells...
  22. pmc In Escherichia coli, MreB and FtsZ direct the synthesis of lateral cell wall via independent pathways that require PBP 2
    Archana Varma
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 191:3526-33. 2009
    ..However, cell shape was determined only by the presence or absence of MreB and not by the even distribution of new wall material as directed by FtsZ...
  23. pmc Comparison of high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis methods for analyzing peptidoglycan composition of Escherichia coli
    Shi Yan Li
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    Anal Biochem 326:1-12. 2004
    ..coli, and the use of FACE as an in vitro enzyme assay detected possible substrate preferences for the endopeptidase penicillin binding protein 4...
  24. ncbi request reprint Sequence divergence of the murB and rrfB genes from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium
    P M Dombrosky
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9001
    Arch Microbiol 161:501-7. 1994
    ..Thus, murB is an exception to the general observation that genes near the origin of replication show less divergence than do genes elsewhere in the bacterial chromosome...
  25. pmc Endopeptidase penicillin-binding proteins 4 and 7 play auxiliary roles in determining uniform morphology of Escherichia coli
    Bernadette M Meberg
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:8326-36. 2004
    ....
  26. pmc Metabolism of dibenzothiophene and naphthalene in Pseudomonas strains: complete DNA sequence of an upper naphthalene catabolic pathway
    S A Denome
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks
    J Bacteriol 175:6890-901. 1993
    ..Our findings indicate that a single genetic pathway controls the metabolism of dibenzothiophene, naphthalene, and phenanthrene in strain C18 and that the DOX sequence encodes a complete upper naphthalene catabolic pathway similar to NAH...
  27. pmc FtsZ directs a second mode of peptidoglycan synthesis in Escherichia coli
    Archana Varma
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:5692-704. 2007
    ..In sum, the results indicate that in addition to nucleating cell septation in E. coli, FtsZ can direct the insertion of new peptidoglycan into portions of the lateral wall...
  28. pmc Daughter cell separation by penicillin-binding proteins and peptidoglycan amidases in Escherichia coli
    Richa Priyadarshini
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:5345-55. 2006
    ..Unexpectedly, amidase mutants lacking PBP 5 grew in long twisted chains instead of straight filaments, indicating that overall septal morphology was also defective in these strains...
  29. ncbi request reprint Escherichia coli and other species of the Enterobacteriaceae encode a protein similar to the family of Mip-like FK506-binding proteins
    S M Horne
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks 58202 9037, USA
    Arch Microbiol 163:357-65. 1995
    ..Thus, mip-like genes are not found exclusively in bacteria having a predominately intracellular life style, but instead appear to be a new FKBP subfamily that is a common constituent of many bacteria...
  30. pmc Role of peptidoglycan amidases in the development and morphology of the division septum in Escherichia coli
    Richa Priyadarshini
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:5334-47. 2007
    ....
  31. pmc Characterization of the desulfurization genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8
    S A Denome
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks 58202
    J Bacteriol 176:6707-16. 1994
    ..The sox genes are plasmidborne and appear to be expressed as an operon in Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 and in E. coli...
  32. pmc Bacterial shape: two-dimensional questions and possibilities
    Kevin D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 7199, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 64:223-40. 2010
    ..In addition, surprising new observations show that the bacterial cell wall is more highly malleable than previously believed and that cells can alter and restore their shapes by relying only on internal mechanisms...
  33. pmc A simple gel electrophoretic method for analyzing the muropeptide composition of bacterial peptidoglycan
    K D Young
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 178:3962-6. 1996
    ..Thus, FACE may be used to identify interesting peptidoglycan samples prior to more-extensive analysis by HPLC, or FACE may eventually replace HPLC for some applications...
  34. pmc Septal and lateral wall localization of PBP5, the major D,D-carboxypeptidase of Escherichia coli, requires substrate recognition and membrane attachment
    Lakshmiprasad Potluri
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 7199, USA
    Mol Microbiol 77:300-23. 2010
    ..The results indicate that PBP5 localization to sites of ongoing peptidoglycan synthesis is substrate dependent and requires membrane attachment...
  35. pmc Helical disposition of proteins and lipopolysaccharide in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli
    Anindya S Ghosh
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    J Bacteriol 187:1913-22. 2005
    ..coli has a defined in vivo organization in which a subfraction of proteins and LPS are embedded in stable domains at the poles and along one or more helical ribbons that span the length of this gram-negative rod...
  36. ncbi request reprint beta-Lactam induction of colanic acid gene expression in Escherichia coli
    Frances C Sailer
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9037, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Lett 226:245-9. 2003
    ..Because colanic acid is important for maturation of biofilm architecture, antibiotics that increase its synthesis might exacerbate the formation or persistence of biofilms...
  37. pmc Loss of O-antigen increases cell shape abnormalities in penicillin-binding protein mutants of Escherichia coli
    Anindya S Ghosh
    Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, WB, India
    FEMS Microbiol Lett 263:252-7. 2006
    ..Thus, the O-antigen contributes to cell shape in E. coli, perhaps by reducing the number of ectopic poles, which may be the proximal cause of shape abnormalities...
  38. pmc Branching of Escherichia coli cells arises from multiple sites of inert peptidoglycan
    Miguel A de Pedro
    Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain
    J Bacteriol 185:1147-52. 2003
    ..These observations suggest that in dacA mutants, branches and other morphological anomalies may arise from split polar caps or by de novo generation of new poles built around inert peptidoglycan patches in the side walls of the cell...
  39. ncbi request reprint Too many strictures on structure
    Kevin D Young
    Trends Microbiol 14:155-6. 2006
    ....
  40. ncbi request reprint Role of penicillin-binding proteins in bacterial cell morphogenesis
    David L Popham
    Department of Biology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 6:594-9. 2003
    ..In addition, the low molecular weight PBPs, by varying the substrates on which other PBPs act, alter peptidoglycan synthesis or turnover, with profound effects on morphology...
  41. pmc Branching sites and morphological abnormalities behave as ectopic poles in shape-defective Escherichia coli
    Trine Nilsen
    Infectious Disease Division, Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Mol Microbiol 52:1045-54. 2004
    ..Such mutants may help to unravel how particular proteins are targeted to bacterial poles, thereby creating important biochemical and functional asymmetries...
  42. pmc Common beta-lactamases inhibit bacterial biofilm formation
    Claude V Gallant
    Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
    Mol Microbiol 58:1012-24. 2005
    ..Beta-lactamases likely affect PG remodelling, manifesting as perturbation of structures involved in bacterial adhesion that are required to initiate biofilm formation...