Robert A Yokel

Summary

Affiliation: University of Kentucky
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Aluminium content of some foods and food products in the USA, with aluminium food additives
    Salim M Saiyed
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USA
    Food Addit Contam 22:234-44. 2005
  2. pmc Aluminum bioavailability from basic sodium aluminum phosphate, an approved food additive emulsifying agent, incorporated in cheese
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, 511C Pharmacy Building, 725 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Food Chem Toxicol 46:2261-6. 2008
  3. pmc Binding, transcytosis and biodistribution of anti-PECAM-1 iron oxide nanoparticles for brain-targeted delivery
    Mo Dan
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e81051. 2013
  4. doi Metal-based nanoparticle interactions with the nervous system: the challenge of brain entry and the risk of retention in the organism
    Robert Yokel
    Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
    Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 5:346-73. 2013
  5. doi Biodistribution and biopersistence of ceria engineered nanomaterials: size dependence
    Robert A Yokel
    Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Nanomedicine 9:398-407. 2013
  6. doi Distribution, elimination, and biopersistence to 90 days of a systemically introduced 30 nm ceria-engineered nanomaterial in rats
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 0596, USA
    Toxicol Sci 127:256-68. 2012
  7. pmc Aluminum bioavailability from tea infusion
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Food Chem Toxicol 46:3659-63. 2008
  8. doi Manganese flux across the blood-brain barrier
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, 511C Pharmacy Building, 725 Rose Street, Lexington, KY, 40536 0082, USA
    Neuromolecular Med 11:297-310. 2009
  9. ncbi Blood-brain barrier flux of aluminum, manganese, iron and other metals suspected to contribute to metal-induced neurodegeneration
    Robert A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    J Alzheimers Dis 10:223-53. 2006
  10. ncbi Aluminum bioavailability from the approved food additive leavening agent acidic sodium aluminum phosphate, incorporated into a baked good, is lower than from water
    Robert A Yokel
    Pharmaceutical Sciences Department, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 725 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicology 227:86-93. 2006

Research Grants

  1. Aluminum bioavailability from foods
    Robert Yokel; Fiscal Year: 2002
  2. Aluminum bioavailability from foods
    Robert Yokel; Fiscal Year: 2003
  3. Aluminum bioavailability from foods
    Robert Yokel; Fiscal Year: 2004

Detail Information

Publications32

  1. ncbi Aluminium content of some foods and food products in the USA, with aluminium food additives
    Salim M Saiyed
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USA
    Food Addit Contam 22:234-44. 2005
    ..Many products provide a significant amount of Al compared to the typical intake of 3-12 mg/day reported from dietary Al studies conducted in many countries...
  2. pmc Aluminum bioavailability from basic sodium aluminum phosphate, an approved food additive emulsifying agent, incorporated in cheese
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, 511C Pharmacy Building, 725 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Food Chem Toxicol 46:2261-6. 2008
    ..These results do not support the hypothesis that drinking water provides a disproportionate contribution to total Al absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract...
  3. pmc Binding, transcytosis and biodistribution of anti-PECAM-1 iron oxide nanoparticles for brain-targeted delivery
    Mo Dan
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e81051. 2013
    ..Characterize the flux of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) antibody-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and its biodistribution in vitro and in vivo...
  4. doi Metal-based nanoparticle interactions with the nervous system: the challenge of brain entry and the risk of retention in the organism
    Robert Yokel
    Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
    Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 5:346-73. 2013
    ..Interpretation of these results must consider the ability of nanoparticles to distribute across the barriers protecting the nervous system. Effects of the persistence of poorly soluble metal-based nanoparticles are of particular concern...
  5. doi Biodistribution and biopersistence of ceria engineered nanomaterials: size dependence
    Robert A Yokel
    Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Nanomedicine 9:398-407. 2013
    ..Very little nanoceria entered brain parenchyma. The results suggest brain delivery of nanoceria will be a challenge...
  6. doi Distribution, elimination, and biopersistence to 90 days of a systemically introduced 30 nm ceria-engineered nanomaterial in rats
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 0596, USA
    Toxicol Sci 127:256-68. 2012
    ..The results support concern about the long-term fate and adverse effects of inert nanoscale metal oxides that distribute throughout the body, are persistently retained, and produce adverse changes...
  7. pmc Aluminum bioavailability from tea infusion
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Food Chem Toxicol 46:3659-63. 2008
    ..Further testing of the hypothesis that Al contributes to Alzheimer's disease may be more warranted with studies focusing on total average daily food intake, including tea and other foods containing appreciable Al, than drinking water...
  8. doi Manganese flux across the blood-brain barrier
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, 511C Pharmacy Building, 725 Rose Street, Lexington, KY, 40536 0082, USA
    Neuromolecular Med 11:297-310. 2009
    ..This may render the brain susceptible to Mn-induced neurotoxicity from excessive Mn exposure...
  9. ncbi Blood-brain barrier flux of aluminum, manganese, iron and other metals suspected to contribute to metal-induced neurodegeneration
    Robert A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    J Alzheimers Dis 10:223-53. 2006
    ..Although brain uptake mechanisms for some metals have been identified, metal efflux from the brain has received little attention, preventing integration of all processes that contribute to brain metal concentrations...
  10. ncbi Aluminum bioavailability from the approved food additive leavening agent acidic sodium aluminum phosphate, incorporated into a baked good, is lower than from water
    Robert A Yokel
    Pharmaceutical Sciences Department, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 725 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicology 227:86-93. 2006
    ..1mg from water, respectively) suggest food provides approximately 25-fold more Al to systemic circulation, and potential Al body burden, than does drinking water...
  11. ncbi The speciation of metals in mammals influences their toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics and therefore human health risk assessment
    Robert A Yokel
    Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev 9:63-85. 2006
    ..More examples are available at a website established as a repository for summaries of the literature on how the speciation of metals affects their toxicokinetics...
  12. pmc Engineered nanomaterials: exposures, hazards, and risk prevention
    Robert A Yokel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536 0082, USA
    J Occup Med Toxicol 6:7. 2011
    ..Small start-up companies and research institutions with limited personnel or expertise in nanotechnology health and safety issues may find this review particularly useful...
  13. doi Rat brain pro-oxidant effects of peripherally administered 5 nm ceria 30 days after exposure
    Sarita S Hardas
    Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0055, USA
    Neurotoxicology 33:1147-55. 2012
    ..These results have important implications on the potential use of ceria ENM as therapeutic agents...
  14. doi Alteration of hepatic structure and oxidative stress induced by intravenous nanoceria
    Michael T Tseng
    Dept of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA
    Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 260:173-82. 2012
    ..Such observations suggest a single vascular infusion of nanoceria can lead to persistent hepatic retention of particles with possible implications for occupational and therapeutic exposures...
  15. ncbi Brain distribution and toxicological evaluation of a systemically delivered engineered nanoscale ceria
    Sarita S Hardas
    Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 0055, USA
    Toxicol Sci 116:562-76. 2010
    ..The results are contrary to the hypothesis that a smaller engineered nanomaterial would more readily permeate the BBB...
  16. pmc Brain microvascular endothelial cell association and distribution of a 5 nm ceria engineered nanomaterial
    Mo Dan
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Academic Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0596, USA
    Int J Nanomedicine 7:4023-36. 2012
    ..Ceria engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have current commercial applications and both neuroprotective and toxic effects. Our hypothesis is that ceria ENMs can associate with brain capillary cells and/or cross the blood-brain barrier...
  17. doi Ceria-engineered nanomaterial distribution in, and clearance from, blood: size matters
    Mo Dan
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
    Nanomedicine (Lond) 7:95-110. 2012
    ..Characterize different sized ceria-engineered nanomaterial (ENM) distribution in, and clearance from, blood (compared to the cerium ion) following intravenous infusion...
  18. ncbi Manganese distribution across the blood-brain barrier. II. Manganese efflux from the brain does not appear to be carrier mediated
    Robert A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy, Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USA
    Neurotoxicology 24:15-22. 2003
    ..Brain capillary diffusion of the Mn ion and Mn citrate would be expected to be slower than sucrose or dextran. The rate of Mn efflux from the brain is consistent with diffusion...
  19. pmc Manufactured aluminum oxide nanoparticles decrease expression of tight junction proteins in brain vasculature
    Lei Chen
    Molecular Neuroscience and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 593 Wethington Bldg, 900 S Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
    J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 3:286-95. 2008
    ..These results indicate that cerebral vasculature can be affected by nano-alumina. In addition, our data indicate that alterations of mitochondrial functions may be the underlying mechanism of nano-alumina toxicity...
  20. doi The influence of citrate, maltolate and fluoride on the gastrointestinal absorption of aluminum at a drinking water-relevant concentration: A 26Al and 14C study
    Yuzhao Zhou
    Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 0305, United States
    J Inorg Biochem 102:798-808. 2008
    ..The presence of citrate, maltolate and fluoride, at a similar molar concentration to Al, would not be expected to greatly influence Al absorption from drinking water...
  21. ncbi Manganese distribution across the blood-brain barrier. IV. Evidence for brain influx through store-operated calcium channels
    Janelle S Crossgrove
    Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0305, USA
    Neurotoxicology 26:297-307. 2005
    ..This work provides evidence that store-operated Ca channels, as well as another mechanism at the blood-brain barrier, likely play a role in carrier-mediated Mn influx into the brain...
  22. pmc Interactions between SIRT1 and AP-1 reveal a mechanistic insight into the growth promoting properties of alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles in mouse skin epithelial cells
    Swatee Dey
    Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Health Sciences Research Building 454, Lexington, KY 40536 0298, USA
    Carcinogenesis 29:1920-9. 2008
    ..The results identify SIRT1 as an AP-1 modulator and suggest a novel mechanism by which alumina nanoparticles may function as a potential carcinogen...
  23. pmc Block copolymer cross-linked nanoassemblies improve particle stability and biocompatibility of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles
    Mo Dan
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536, USA
    Pharm Res 30:552-61. 2013
    ..To develop cross-linked nanoassemblies (CNAs) as carriers for superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)...
  24. ncbi Manganese distribution across the blood-brain barrier III. The divalent metal transporter-1 is not the major mechanism mediating brain manganese uptake
    Janelle S Crossgrove
    Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0305 USA
    Neurotoxicology 25:451-60. 2004
    ..Mn appears to distribute across the rat blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain by one or more carrier-mediated processes other than the DMT-1...
  25. pmc Brain uptake, retention, and efflux of aluminum and manganese
    Robert A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Pharmacy Building, Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 110:699-704. 2002
    ..The BBB permeation of Al and Mn is mediated by carriers that may help regulate their brain concentrations...
  26. ncbi Comparison of cell uptake, biodistribution and tumor retention of folate-coated and PEG-coated gadolinium nanoparticles in tumor-bearing mice
    Moses O Oyewumi
    Center for Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, 907 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    J Control Release 95:613-26. 2004
    ..The engineered nanoparticles may have potential in tumor-targeted delivery of Gd thereby enhancing the therapeutic success of NCT...
  27. ncbi Manganese distribution across the blood-brain barrier. I. Evidence for carrier-mediated influx of managanese citrate as well as manganese and manganese transferrin
    Janelle S Crossgrove
    Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0305, USA
    Neurotoxicology 24:3-13. 2003
    ..The greater Kin values for Mn citrate than Mn2+ and its presence as a major non-protein-bound Mn species in blood plasma suggest Mn citrate may be a major Mn species entering the brain...
  28. doi Intranasal drug delivery of didanosine-loaded chitosan nanoparticles for brain targeting; an attractive route against infections caused by AIDS viruses
    Abeer M Al-Ghananeem
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    J Drug Target 18:381-8. 2010
    ..n. dosing was 2.1 and 1.9 in CSF and brain, respectively. Thus, both the i.n. route of administration and formulation of ddI in chitosan nanoparticles increased delivery of ddI to CSF and brain...
  29. ncbi The chemical species of aluminum influences its paracellular flux across and uptake into Caco-2 cells, a model of gastrointestinal absorption
    Yuzhao Zhou
    Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 0305, USA
    Toxicol Sci 87:15-26. 2005
    ....
  30. ncbi Applying accelerator mass spectrometry for low-level detection of complex engineered nanoparticles in biological media
    Binghui Wang
    Departments of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, United States
    J Pharm Biomed Anal 97:81-7. 2014
    ..Tracking both the core and surface components by AMS presents a new approach for characterizing transformations of CENPs components in biological milieu or environments. ..
  31. ncbi Aluminum citrate uptake by immortalized brain endothelial cells: implications for its blood-brain barrier transport
    Robert A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, 501B Pharmacy Building Rose Street, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Brain Res 930:101-10. 2002
    ....
  32. pmc Human health risk assessment for aluminium, aluminium oxide, and aluminium hydroxide
    Daniel Krewski
    Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev 10:1-269. 2007

Research Grants4

  1. Aluminum bioavailability from foods
    Robert Yokel; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..abstract_text> ..
  2. Aluminum bioavailability from foods
    Robert Yokel; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. Aluminum bioavailability from foods
    Robert Yokel; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..abstract_text> ..