R A Yokel

Summary

Affiliation: University of Kentucky
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Prevention and treatment of aluminum toxicity including chelation therapy: status and research needs
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health 48:667-83. 1996
  2. ncbi request reprint Aluminum bioavailability from drinking water is very low and is not appreciably influenced by stomach contents or water hardness
    R A Yokel
    Pharmacy Building, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicology 161:93-101. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint The toxicology of aluminum in the brain: a review
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, USA
    Neurotoxicology 21:813-28. 2000
  4. ncbi request reprint The distribution of aluminum into and out of the brain
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    J Inorg Biochem 76:127-32. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint The hexadentate hydroxypyridinonate TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO) is a more orally active iron chelator than its bidentate analogue
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 0082, USA
    J Pharm Sci 89:545-55. 2000
  6. ncbi request reprint Entry, half-life, and desferrioxamine-accelerated clearance of brain aluminum after a single (26)Al exposure
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicol Sci 64:77-82. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint Aluminum transport out of brain extracellular fluid is proton dependent and inhibited by mersalyl acid, suggesting mediation by the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1)
    D C Ackley
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicology 127:59-67. 1998
  8. ncbi request reprint Aluminium toxicokinetics: an updated minireview
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    Pharmacol Toxicol 88:159-67. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Glomerular lesions in male rabbits treated with aluminium lactate: with special reference to microaneurysm formation
    C B Hong
    Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington 40511, USA
    Exp Toxicol Pathol 52:139-43. 2000
  10. ncbi request reprint Postmortem elevation in extracellular glutamate in the rat hippocampus when brain temperature is maintained at physiological levels: implications for the use of human brain autopsy tissues
    J W Geddes
    Sanders Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 0230, USA
    Brain Res 831:104-12. 1999

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. ncbi request reprint Prevention and treatment of aluminum toxicity including chelation therapy: status and research needs
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health 48:667-83. 1996
    ..The reduction of Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression and the reversal of Al-induced behavioral deficits and neurofibrillary tangles by DFO encourage further study of Al chelation therapy for selected neurodegenerative disorders...
  2. ncbi request reprint Aluminum bioavailability from drinking water is very low and is not appreciably influenced by stomach contents or water hardness
    R A Yokel
    Pharmacy Building, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicology 161:93-101. 2001
    ..The present and published results suggest oral bioavailability of Al from drinking water is very low, about 0.3%. The present results suggest it is independent of stomach contents and water hardness...
  3. ncbi request reprint The toxicology of aluminum in the brain: a review
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, USA
    Neurotoxicology 21:813-28. 2000
    ..Facilitation of Fe-induced oxidative injury and disruption of basic cell processes may mediate primary molecular mechanisms of Al-induced neurotoxicity. Avoidance of Al exposure, when practical, seems prudent...
  4. ncbi request reprint The distribution of aluminum into and out of the brain
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    J Inorg Biochem 76:127-32. 1999
    ..Although some Al that enters the brain is rapidly effluxed, it is suggested that a fraction enters brain compartments within 24 h from which it is only very slowly eliminated...
  5. ncbi request reprint The hexadentate hydroxypyridinonate TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO) is a more orally active iron chelator than its bidentate analogue
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 0082, USA
    J Pharm Sci 89:545-55. 2000
    ..The results also demonstrate that TREN-(Me-3, 2-HOPO) is a promising, orally effective, Fe chelator...
  6. ncbi request reprint Entry, half-life, and desferrioxamine-accelerated clearance of brain aluminum after a single (26)Al exposure
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicol Sci 64:77-82. 2001
    ..The ability of repeated DFO treatments to modestly accelerate the reduction of brain Al is consistent with the necessity of prolonged DFO therapy to significantly reduce Al-induced dialysis encephalopathy...
  7. ncbi request reprint Aluminum transport out of brain extracellular fluid is proton dependent and inhibited by mersalyl acid, suggesting mediation by the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1)
    D C Ackley
    College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    Toxicology 127:59-67. 1998
    ..Mersalyl acid (50 mM) addition to brain dialysate increased the steady-state aluminum brain-to-blood ratio from 0.19 to 0.87, suggesting that MCT1 is at least partially mediating the efflux of aluminum from brain extracellular fluid...
  8. ncbi request reprint Aluminium toxicokinetics: an updated minireview
    R A Yokel
    College of Pharmacy and Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536 0082, USA
    Pharmacol Toxicol 88:159-67. 2001
    ..Al elimination is primarily renal with < or = 2% excreted in bile. The contribution of food to absorbed Al needs to be determined to advance our understanding of the major components of Al toxicokinetics...
  9. ncbi request reprint Glomerular lesions in male rabbits treated with aluminium lactate: with special reference to microaneurysm formation
    C B Hong
    Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington 40511, USA
    Exp Toxicol Pathol 52:139-43. 2000
    ..The sclerotic change is interpreted as a sequela of microaneurysm. The findings suggest that aluminum induces glomerular lesions in rabbits. This may serve as a good animal model to study mesangiolysis and microaneurysm formation...
  10. ncbi request reprint Postmortem elevation in extracellular glutamate in the rat hippocampus when brain temperature is maintained at physiological levels: implications for the use of human brain autopsy tissues
    J W Geddes
    Sanders Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 0230, USA
    Brain Res 831:104-12. 1999
    ..Therefore, extracellular glutamate levels are likely to increase in the postmortem human brain and may contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage occurring in the interval between death and autopsy...