Yukiko Yamashita

Summary

Affiliation: University of Michigan
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc A tale of mother and daughter
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 21:7-8. 2010
  2. pmc E-cadherin is required for centrosome and spindle orientation in Drosophila male germline stem cells
    Mayu Inaba
    Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12473. 2010
  3. pmc Nonrandom template segregation: a way to break the symmetry of stem cells
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute and 2 Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
    J Cell Biol 203:7-9. 2013
  4. ncbi request reprint Biased DNA segregation in Drosophila male germline stem cells
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States Electronic address
    Semin Cell Dev Biol 24:618-26. 2013
  5. doi request reprint Nonrandom sister chromatid segregation of sex chromosomes in Drosophila male germline stem cells
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Chromosome Res 21:243-54. 2013
  6. pmc Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 22:605-10. 2010
  7. pmc Polarity in stem cell division: asymmetric stem cell division in tissue homeostasis
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2:a001313. 2010
  8. pmc The centrosome and asymmetric cell division
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2216, USA
    Prion 3:84-8. 2009
  9. pmc Regulation of asymmetric stem cell division: spindle orientation and the centrosome
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) 14:3003-11. 2009
  10. doi request reprint Asymmetric stem cell division and pathology: insights from Drosophila stem cell systems
    Y Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    J Pathol 217:181-5. 2009

Collaborators

  • DANA LEANNE JONES
  • Salli I Tazuke
  • Friedhelm Hildebrandt
  • Margaret T Fuller
  • Mayu Inaba
  • Edgar A Otto
  • Jun Cheng
  • Cordula Schulz
  • Jeroen van Reeuwijk
  • Shawn Levy
  • Suresh B Patil
  • Hartmut P H Neumann
  • Gudrun Nurnberg
  • Nicholas Obermüller
  • Chi V Dang
  • Robert H Lyons
  • Rachel H Giles
  • David S Williams
  • Stef J F Letteboer
  • Carsten Bergmann
  • Eamonn R Maher
  • James Macdonald
  • Heather M McLaughlin
  • Amiya K Ghosh
  • Vanda Lopes
  • Eric A Pierce
  • Nicholas Katsanis
  • Irma Lopez
  • Xinmin Zhang
  • Viktoria Salzmann
  • Carlos A Murga-Zamalloa
  • Jennifer M Kasanuki
  • Weibin Zhou
  • Jinny Conte
  • Corinne Stoetzel
  • Hebao Yuan
  • Corinne Antignac
  • Alejandro Estrada-Cuzcano
  • Peter K Jackson
  • Jinghua Hu
  • Moumita Chaki
  • Toby W Hurd
  • Qin Liu
  • Hemant Khanna
  • Peter Nurnberg
  • Daniela A Brito
  • Helene Dollfus
  • Robert K Koenekoop
  • Lisa M Guay-Woodford
  • Mónica Bettencourt Dias
  • Richard A Lewis
  • Karlien L M Coene
  • Susanne Held
  • Rob W J Collin
  • Xiaoshu Bei
  • James D Cavalcoli
  • Ronald Roepman
  • Sophie Saunier
  • Joseph Washburn
  • Gokul Ramaswami
  • Rannar Airik
  • Liyun Sang
  • Nahid Hemati
  • Alan J Hunt
  • Nezaket Turkel
  • Cricket G Wood
  • Amy A Kiger
  • Luiz C Pantalena-Filho

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. pmc A tale of mother and daughter
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 21:7-8. 2010
    ..When I started, there was a big gap between my love for science and my experience as a scientist. I filled this gap by learning a "laid-back confidence."..
  2. pmc E-cadherin is required for centrosome and spindle orientation in Drosophila male germline stem cells
    Mayu Inaba
    Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12473. 2010
    ..We propose that E-cadherin orchestrates multiple aspects of stem cell behavior, including polarization of stem cells toward the stem cell-niche interface and adhesion of stem cells to the niche supporting cells...
  3. pmc Nonrandom template segregation: a way to break the symmetry of stem cells
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute and 2 Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
    J Cell Biol 203:7-9. 2013
    ..201307110/DC1) now show a high frequency of nonrandom template segregation during differentiation of embryonic stem cells using rigorous experimentation and implicate the methyltransferase Dnmt3 as a key regulator of this process. ..
  4. ncbi request reprint Biased DNA segregation in Drosophila male germline stem cells
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States Electronic address
    Semin Cell Dev Biol 24:618-26. 2013
    ..We will discuss the implications of this observation and molecular mechanisms, which might be applicable to non-random sister chromatid segregation in other systems as well. ..
  5. doi request reprint Nonrandom sister chromatid segregation of sex chromosomes in Drosophila male germline stem cells
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Chromosome Res 21:243-54. 2013
    ..Recently, we found that Drosophila male germline stem cells segregate sister chromatids of X and Y chromosomes with a strong bias. We discuss this finding in relation to existing models for nonrandom sister chromatid segregation...
  6. pmc Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 22:605-10. 2010
    ..Here, I review the recent discovery that cell adhesion molecules govern the behavior of stem cells...
  7. pmc Polarity in stem cell division: asymmetric stem cell division in tissue homeostasis
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2:a001313. 2010
    ..Here, we review asymmetric stem cell divisions in the context of the stem cell niche with a focus on Drosophila germ line stem cells, where the nature of niche-dependent asymmetric stem cell division is well characterized...
  8. pmc The centrosome and asymmetric cell division
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2216, USA
    Prion 3:84-8. 2009
    ..In this review, I summarize recent discoveries in cellular polarity that lead to an asymmetric outcome, with a focus on centrosome function...
  9. pmc Regulation of asymmetric stem cell division: spindle orientation and the centrosome
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) 14:3003-11. 2009
    ..This review will summarize the importance of stem cell function and the role of asymmetric division in controlling stem cell behavior...
  10. doi request reprint Asymmetric stem cell division and pathology: insights from Drosophila stem cell systems
    Y Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    J Pathol 217:181-5. 2009
    ..Here, I discuss the implications of asymmetric stem cell division in pathology...
  11. doi request reprint Selfish stem cells compete with each other
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2216, USA
    Cell Stem Cell 2:3-4. 2008
    ..In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Jin et al. (2008) demonstrate that stem cells compete for niche occupancy, ultimately leading to the domination of one stem cell population over time...
  12. pmc Asymmetric centrosome behavior and the mechanisms of stem cell division
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    J Cell Biol 180:261-6. 2008
    ..Rev. Genet. 8:462-472). These findings provide new insights and suggest intriguing new models for how cells coordinate spindle orientation with their cellular microenvironment to regulate and direct cell fate decisions within tissues...
  13. pmc Asymmetric inheritance of mother versus daughter centrosome in stem cell division
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Science 315:518-21. 2007
    ..The mother centrosome remains anchored near the niche while the daughter centrosome migrates to the opposite side of the cell before spindle formation...
  14. ncbi request reprint Orientation of asymmetric stem cell division by the APC tumor suppressor and centrosome
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Science 301:1547-50. 2003
    ....
  15. pmc Centrosome misorientation reduces stem cell division during ageing
    Jun Cheng
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
    Nature 456:599-604. 2008
    ..We also show that some of the misoriented GSCs probably originate from dedifferentiation of spermatogonia...
  16. ncbi request reprint Signaling in stem cell niches: lessons from the Drosophila germline
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Department of Development Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Cell Sci 118:665-72. 2005
    ..Recent results describing stem cell niches in other adult stem cells, including hematopoietic and neural stem cells, have demonstrated that the features characteristic of stem cell niches in Drosophila gonads might be conserved...
  17. pmc A misexpression screen reveals effects of bag-of-marbles and TGF beta class signaling on the Drosophila male germ-line stem cell lineage
    Cordula Schulz
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5329, USA
    Genetics 167:707-23. 2004
    ..In addition, forced activation of the TGF beta signal transduction pathway in germ cells inhibits the transition from the spermatogonial mitotic amplification program to spermatocyte differentiation...
  18. ncbi request reprint Asymmetric stem cell division and function of the niche in the Drosophila male germ line
    Yukiko M Yamashita
    Department of Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Int J Hematol 82:377-80. 2005
    ..In addition to signals from the niche that specify stem cell self-renewal, the stem cells themselves have elaborate cellular mechanisms to ensure the asymmetric outcome of cell division...
  19. pmc Candidate exome capture identifies mutation of SDCCAG8 as the cause of a retinal-renal ciliopathy
    Edgar A Otto
    Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
    Nat Genet 42:840-50. 2010
    ..This work identifies loss of SDCCAG8 function as a cause of a retinal-renal ciliopathy and validates exome capture analysis for broadly heterogeneous single-gene disorders...

Research Grants4

  1. Physiological regulation and function of asymmetric stem cell division
    Yukiko Yamashita; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Understanding of such mechanisms may allow us to manipulate stem cell behavior; for example, normal stem cells can be expanded in culture for transplantation, or we can inhibit the expansion of cancerous stem cells. ..
  2. Physiological regulation and function of asymmetric stem cell division
    Yukiko Yamashita; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Understanding of such mechanisms may allow us to manipulate stem cell behavior;for example, normal stem cells can be expanded in culture for transplantation, or we can inhibit the expansion of cancerous stem cells. ..
  3. Physiological regulation and function of asymmetric stem cell division
    Yukiko Yamashita; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Understanding of such mechanisms may allow us to manipulate stem cell behavior; for example, normal stem cells can be expanded in culture for transplantation, or we can inhibit the expansion of cancerous stem cells. ..
  4. Physiological regulation and function of asymmetric stem cell division
    Yukiko Yamashita; Fiscal Year: 2011
    ..Understanding of such mechanisms may allow us to manipulate stem cell behavior;for example, normal stem cells can be expanded in culture for transplantation, or we can inhibit the expansion of cancerous stem cells. ..