T M Williams

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Running, swimming and diving modifies neuroprotecting globins in the mammalian brain
    Terrie M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health Long Marine Laboratory, University of California at Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:751-8. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Seasonal variability in otariid energetics: implications for the effects of predators on localized prey resources
    Terrie M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health Long Marine Laboratory, 100 Shaffer Road, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95060, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 80:433-43. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint The cost of foraging by a marine predator, the Weddell seal Leptonychotes weddellii: pricing by the stroke
    Terrie M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Laboratory, 100 Shaffer Road, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:973-82. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint A killer appetite: metabolic consequences of carnivory in marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 129:785-96. 2001
  5. doi request reprint The effects of water temperature on the energetic costs of juvenile and adult California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): the importance of skeletal muscle thermogenesis for thermal balance
    H E M Liwanag
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:3977-84. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint The diving physiology of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). I. Balancing the demands of exercise for energy conservation at depth
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Science Building, A 316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Exp Biol 202:2739-48. 1999
  7. ncbi request reprint Sink or swim: strategies for cost-efficient diving by marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Science 288:133-6. 2000
  8. doi request reprint Changes in partial pressures of respiratory gases during submerged voluntary breath hold across odontocetes: is body mass important?
    S R Noren
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Center for Ocean Health, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 182:299-309. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint The development of diving in marine endotherms: preparing the skeletal muscles of dolphins, penguins, and seals for activity during submergence
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, University of California at Santa Cruz, 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 171:127-34. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Body size and skeletal muscle myoglobin of cetaceans: adaptations for maximizing dive duration
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Sciences Building, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 126:181-91. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. pmc Running, swimming and diving modifies neuroprotecting globins in the mammalian brain
    Terrie M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health Long Marine Laboratory, University of California at Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:751-8. 2008
    ..This enables marine mammals to maintain sensory and locomotor neural functions during prolonged submergence, and suggests new avenues for averting oxygen-mediated neural injury in the mammalian brain...
  2. ncbi request reprint Seasonal variability in otariid energetics: implications for the effects of predators on localized prey resources
    Terrie M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health Long Marine Laboratory, 100 Shaffer Road, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95060, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 80:433-43. 2007
    ..This localized impact is reduced significantly with postbreeding dispersal and demonstrates the importance of considering spatial and temporal factors driving the energetic requirements of predators when designing marine protected areas...
  3. ncbi request reprint The cost of foraging by a marine predator, the Weddell seal Leptonychotes weddellii: pricing by the stroke
    Terrie M Williams
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Laboratory, 100 Shaffer Road, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:973-82. 2004
    ..By accounting for each of these costs and monitoring stroking mechanics, it is possible to estimate the aerobic cost of diving in free-ranging seals where cryptic behavior and remote locations prevent direct energetic measurements...
  4. ncbi request reprint A killer appetite: metabolic consequences of carnivory in marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 129:785-96. 2001
    ....
  5. doi request reprint The effects of water temperature on the energetic costs of juvenile and adult California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): the importance of skeletal muscle thermogenesis for thermal balance
    H E M Liwanag
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:3977-84. 2009
    ..377, P=0.583) in swimming metabolic rate was found among water temperatures, suggesting that thermal disadvantages due to small body size in juvenile sea lions may be circumvented by recycling endogenous heat during locomotor activity...
  6. ncbi request reprint The diving physiology of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). I. Balancing the demands of exercise for energy conservation at depth
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Science Building, A 316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Exp Biol 202:2739-48. 1999
    ..Physiological and behavioral measurements from this study indicate that superimposing swimming exercise on apnea was energetically costly for the diving dolphin but was circumvented in part by modifying the mode of swimming...
  7. ncbi request reprint Sink or swim: strategies for cost-efficient diving by marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Science 288:133-6. 2000
    ..2 to 59.6% reduction in diving energetic costs. This energy-conserving strategy allows marine mammals to increase aerobic dive duration and achieve remarkable depths despite limited oxygen availability when submerged...
  8. doi request reprint Changes in partial pressures of respiratory gases during submerged voluntary breath hold across odontocetes: is body mass important?
    S R Noren
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Center for Ocean Health, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 182:299-309. 2012
    ..Rather, breath hold ended voluntarily as respiratory gases and pH fell within a narrow range for both large and small species, likely providing cues for ventilation...
  9. ncbi request reprint The development of diving in marine endotherms: preparing the skeletal muscles of dolphins, penguins, and seals for activity during submergence
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, University of California at Santa Cruz, 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 171:127-34. 2001
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Body size and skeletal muscle myoglobin of cetaceans: adaptations for maximizing dive duration
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Sciences Building, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 126:181-91. 2000
    ..While independent analysis of the odontocetes showed that body mass and myoglobin content accounts for 83% of the variation in odontocete dive capacity...
  11. ncbi request reprint Diving and swimming performance of white whales, Delphinapterus leucas: an assessment of plasma lactate and blood gas levels and respiratory rates
    S A Shaffer
    Marine Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Exp Biol 200:3091-9. 1997
    ..8 m s-1. The results of this study are consistent with the calculated aerobic dive limit (O2 store/metabolic rate) of 9-10 min. In addition, white whales are not well adapted for high-speed swimming compared with other small cetaceans...
  12. ncbi request reprint Effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia on aerobic metabolic processes in northern elephant seals
    S Kohin
    Department of Biology and Institute of Marine Science, University of California at Santa Cruz, 95064, USA
    Respir Physiol 117:59-72. 1999
    ..In young elephant seals metabolic down-regulation is not an automatic protective response to experimentally-imposed hypoxia or hypercapnia...
  13. ncbi request reprint Thermoregulation during swimming and diving in bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus
    D P Noren
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 169:93-9. 1999
    ..However, the majority of excess heat in dolphins appears to be dissipated upon resurfacing, thereby preserving the oxygen-conserving benefits of the dive response...
  14. doi request reprint The ontogeny of aerobic and diving capacity in the skeletal muscles of Weddell seals
    S B Kanatous
    Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 1878, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:2559-65. 2008
    ..As these future elite divers mature, their skeletal muscles transform to a more sedentary state in order to maintain the low levels of aerobic metabolism associated with long-duration diving...
  15. ncbi request reprint Diving and foraging energetics of the smallest marine mammal, the sea otter (Enhydra lutris)
    Laura C Yeates
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:1960-70. 2007
    ..This was achieved by counterbalancing elevated foraging costs with prolonged periods of rest on the water surface...
  16. ncbi request reprint Ecological implications of body composition and thermal capabilities in young antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella)
    Matthew R Rutishauser
    Long Marine Laboratory, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:669-81. 2004
    ..8 to 36.2 d before succumbing to starvation. The most likely maximum travel distance within this time constraint suggests that food resources close to the natal rookery are important to first-year survival for this species...
  17. pmc Causes and consequences of marine mammal population declines in southwest Alaska: a food-web perspective
    J A Estes
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:1647-58. 2009
    ..Our results indicate that while such a system is possible, it could only exist under a narrow range of extreme conditions and is therefore highly unlikely...
  18. ncbi request reprint The development of diving bradycardia in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)
    S R Noren
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Center for Ocean Health, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 174:139-47. 2004
    ..5 years postpartum. Limited ability for bradycardia may partially explain the short dive durations observed for immature marine mammals...
  19. ncbi request reprint Running energetics of the North American river otter: do short legs necessarily reduce efficiency on land?
    Terrie M Williams
    Department of EE Biology, Center for Ocean Health Long Marine Laboratory, 100 Shaffer Road, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 133:203-12. 2002
    ..Such an aerial period was not observed in river otters with the result that energetic costs during running were higher and gait transition speeds slower for this versatile mammal compared to locomotor specialists...
  20. ncbi request reprint Skeletal muscle histology and biochemistry of an elite sprinter, the African cheetah
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 167:527-35. 1997
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Energy reserve utilization in northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups during the postweaning fast: size does matter
    D P Noren
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 173:443-54. 2003
    ..This suggests that body composition at weaning influences lipid utilization patterns and ultimately the duration of the postweaning fast in northern elephant seal pups...
  22. ncbi request reprint New insights into the physiology of natural foraging
    Jennifer M Burns
    Department of Biological Sciences, 3211 Providence Drive, University of Alaska, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 79:242-9. 2006
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint The diving paradox: new insights into the role of the dive response in air-breathing vertebrates
    Randall W Davis
    Department of Marine Biology, Texas A and M University, 5007 Avenue U, Galveston, TX 77551, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 138:263-8. 2004
    ..Optimizing the use of blood and muscle oxygen stores allows aquatic, air-breathing vertebrates to exercise for prolonged periods while holding their breath...