T M Williams

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Skeletal muscle histology and biochemistry of an elite sprinter, the African cheetah
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 167:527-35. 1997
  2. ncbi request reprint The diving physiology of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). I. Balancing the demands of exercise for energy conservation at depth
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Science Building, A 316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Exp Biol 202:2739-48. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint Sink or swim: strategies for cost-efficient diving by marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Science 288:133-6. 2000
  4. doi request reprint The effects of water temperature on the energetic costs of juvenile and adult California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): the importance of skeletal muscle thermogenesis for thermal balance
    H E M Liwanag
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:3977-84. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint The development of diving in marine endotherms: preparing the skeletal muscles of dolphins, penguins, and seals for activity during submergence
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, University of California at Santa Cruz, 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 171:127-34. 2001
  6. doi request reprint Changes in partial pressures of respiratory gases during submerged voluntary breath hold across odontocetes: is body mass important?
    S R Noren
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Center for Ocean Health, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 182:299-309. 2012
  7. ncbi request reprint A killer appetite: metabolic consequences of carnivory in marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 129:785-96. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Body size and skeletal muscle myoglobin of cetaceans: adaptations for maximizing dive duration
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Sciences Building, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 126:181-91. 2000
  9. ncbi request reprint Diving and swimming performance of white whales, Delphinapterus leucas: an assessment of plasma lactate and blood gas levels and respiratory rates
    S A Shaffer
    Marine Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Exp Biol 200:3091-9. 1997
  10. ncbi request reprint Thermoregulation during swimming and diving in bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus
    D P Noren
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 169:93-9. 1999

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. ncbi request reprint Skeletal muscle histology and biochemistry of an elite sprinter, the African cheetah
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 167:527-35. 1997
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint The diving physiology of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). I. Balancing the demands of exercise for energy conservation at depth
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Science Building, A 316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Exp Biol 202:2739-48. 1999
    ..Physiological and behavioral measurements from this study indicate that superimposing swimming exercise on apnea was energetically costly for the diving dolphin but was circumvented in part by modifying the mode of swimming...
  3. ncbi request reprint Sink or swim: strategies for cost-efficient diving by marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Science 288:133-6. 2000
    ..2 to 59.6% reduction in diving energetic costs. This energy-conserving strategy allows marine mammals to increase aerobic dive duration and achieve remarkable depths despite limited oxygen availability when submerged...
  4. doi request reprint The effects of water temperature on the energetic costs of juvenile and adult California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): the importance of skeletal muscle thermogenesis for thermal balance
    H E M Liwanag
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:3977-84. 2009
    ..377, P=0.583) in swimming metabolic rate was found among water temperatures, suggesting that thermal disadvantages due to small body size in juvenile sea lions may be circumvented by recycling endogenous heat during locomotor activity...
  5. ncbi request reprint The development of diving in marine endotherms: preparing the skeletal muscles of dolphins, penguins, and seals for activity during submergence
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, University of California at Santa Cruz, 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 171:127-34. 2001
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Changes in partial pressures of respiratory gases during submerged voluntary breath hold across odontocetes: is body mass important?
    S R Noren
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Center for Ocean Health, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 182:299-309. 2012
    ..Rather, breath hold ended voluntarily as respiratory gases and pH fell within a narrow range for both large and small species, likely providing cues for ventilation...
  7. ncbi request reprint A killer appetite: metabolic consequences of carnivory in marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 129:785-96. 2001
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Body size and skeletal muscle myoglobin of cetaceans: adaptations for maximizing dive duration
    S R Noren
    Department of Biology, Earth and Marine Sciences Building, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 126:181-91. 2000
    ..While independent analysis of the odontocetes showed that body mass and myoglobin content accounts for 83% of the variation in odontocete dive capacity...
  9. ncbi request reprint Diving and swimming performance of white whales, Delphinapterus leucas: an assessment of plasma lactate and blood gas levels and respiratory rates
    S A Shaffer
    Marine Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Exp Biol 200:3091-9. 1997
    ..8 m s-1. The results of this study are consistent with the calculated aerobic dive limit (O2 store/metabolic rate) of 9-10 min. In addition, white whales are not well adapted for high-speed swimming compared with other small cetaceans...
  10. ncbi request reprint Thermoregulation during swimming and diving in bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus
    D P Noren
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 169:93-9. 1999
    ..However, the majority of excess heat in dolphins appears to be dissipated upon resurfacing, thereby preserving the oxygen-conserving benefits of the dive response...
  11. doi request reprint The ontogeny of aerobic and diving capacity in the skeletal muscles of Weddell seals
    S B Kanatous
    Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 1878, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:2559-65. 2008
    ..As these future elite divers mature, their skeletal muscles transform to a more sedentary state in order to maintain the low levels of aerobic metabolism associated with long-duration diving...
  12. ncbi request reprint The development of diving bradycardia in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)
    S R Noren
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Center for Ocean Health, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 174:139-47. 2004
    ..5 years postpartum. Limited ability for bradycardia may partially explain the short dive durations observed for immature marine mammals...
  13. ncbi request reprint Energy reserve utilization in northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups during the postweaning fast: size does matter
    D P Noren
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 173:443-54. 2003
    ..This suggests that body composition at weaning influences lipid utilization patterns and ultimately the duration of the postweaning fast in northern elephant seal pups...
  14. pmc Causes and consequences of marine mammal population declines in southwest Alaska: a food-web perspective
    J A Estes
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:1647-58. 2009
    ..Our results indicate that while such a system is possible, it could only exist under a narrow range of extreme conditions and is therefore highly unlikely...
  15. pmc Sequential megafaunal collapse in the North Pacific Ocean: an ongoing legacy of industrial whaling?
    A M Springer
    Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:12223-8. 2003
    ..The timing of these events, information on the abundance, diet, and foraging behavior of both predators and prey, and feasibility analyses based on demographic and energetic modeling are all consistent with this hypothesis...
  16. ncbi request reprint Aerobic capacities in the skeletal muscles of Weddell seals: key to longer dive durations?
    S B Kanatous
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:3601-8. 2002
    ..The lower aerobic capacity of Weddell seal muscle as compared with that of shorter-duration divers appears to reflect their energy-conserving modes of locomotion, which enable longer and deeper dives...
  17. ncbi request reprint The effect of submergence on heart rate and oxygen consumption of swimming seals and sea lions
    T M Williams
    Physiological Research Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92037
    J Comp Physiol B 160:637-44. 1991
    ..3 to 3.6 J.m-1.kg-1, and was 2.5-4.0 times the level predicted for similarly-sized salmonids. Despite different modes of propulsion and physiological responses to swimming, these pinnipeds demonstrate similar transport costs...
  18. ncbi request reprint Fuel homeostasis in the harbor seal during submerged swimming
    R W Davis
    Physiological Research Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92037
    J Comp Physiol B 160:627-35. 1991
    ..However, the oxidation rate increased almost 3.5-fold and accounted for 85% of the turnover.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)..