Timothy D Weaver

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Did a discrete event 200,000-100,000 years ago produce modern humans?
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:121-6. 2012
  2. pmc Out of Africa: modern human origins special feature: the meaning of neandertal skeletal morphology
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:16028-33. 2009
  3. pmc Neandertal birth canal shape and the evolution of human childbirth
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:8151-6. 2009
  4. pmc Close correspondence between quantitative- and molecular-genetic divergence times for Neandertals and modern humans
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:4645-9. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Were neandertal and modern human cranial differences produced by natural selection or genetic drift?
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:135-45. 2007
  6. doi request reprint Do modern humans and Neandertals have different patterns of cranial integration?
    Charles C Roseman
    Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, 102 Davenport Hall, 607 S Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61802, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:684-93. 2011
  7. doi request reprint Who made the Aurignacian and other early Upper Paleolithic industries?
    Shara E Bailey
    Department of Anthropology, New York University, 25 Waverly Place, New York, NY 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:11-26. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Molecules versus morphology? Not for the human cranium
    Charles C Roseman
    Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
    Bioessays 29:1185-8. 2007
  9. doi request reprint The affinity of the dental remains from Obi-Rakhmat Grotto, Uzbekistan
    Shara Bailey
    New York University, Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of Anthropology, New York, NY, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:238-48. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Human cranial anatomy and the differential preservation of population history and climate signatures
    Katerina Harvati
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 288:1225-33. 2006

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. doi request reprint Did a discrete event 200,000-100,000 years ago produce modern humans?
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    J Hum Evol 63:121-6. 2012
    ..That this class of models is a viable option has implications for how modern human origins is conceptualized...
  2. pmc Out of Africa: modern human origins special feature: the meaning of neandertal skeletal morphology
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:16028-33. 2009
    ..For both the cranium and the postcranium, changes in diet or activity patterns may underlie why Neandertals and Pleistocene modern humans tend to be more robust than Holocene humans...
  3. pmc Neandertal birth canal shape and the evolution of human childbirth
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:8151-6. 2009
    ..Such a late shift underscores the uniqueness of human childbirth and the divergent evolutionary trajectories of Neandertals and the lineage leading to present-day humans...
  4. pmc Close correspondence between quantitative- and molecular-genetic divergence times for Neandertals and modern humans
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:4645-9. 2008
    ..Nonetheless, for the measurements we consider here, we find no conflict between molecules and morphology...
  5. ncbi request reprint Were neandertal and modern human cranial differences produced by natural selection or genetic drift?
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:135-45. 2007
    ..We conclude that rather than requiring special adaptive accounts, Neandertal and modern human crania may simply represent two outcomes from a vast space of random evolutionary possibilities...
  6. doi request reprint Do modern humans and Neandertals have different patterns of cranial integration?
    Charles C Roseman
    Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, 102 Davenport Hall, 607 S Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61802, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:684-93. 2011
    ..We conclude that the evolution of patterns of cranial integration is a cause for caution but also presents an opportunity for understanding cranial differences between modern humans and Neandertals...
  7. doi request reprint Who made the Aurignacian and other early Upper Paleolithic industries?
    Shara E Bailey
    Department of Anthropology, New York University, 25 Waverly Place, New York, NY 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 57:11-26. 2009
    ..These results provide some of the strongest evidence that anatomically modern humans made the Aurignacian and other (non-Châtelperronian) early Upper Paleolithic industries...
  8. ncbi request reprint Molecules versus morphology? Not for the human cranium
    Charles C Roseman
    Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
    Bioessays 29:1185-8. 2007
    ..It appears that the amount of phenotypic variance in the human cranium decreases at the population level as a function of distance from Sub-Saharan Africa much in the same way as observed for human molecular data...
  9. doi request reprint The affinity of the dental remains from Obi-Rakhmat Grotto, Uzbekistan
    Shara Bailey
    New York University, Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of Anthropology, New York, NY, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:238-48. 2008
    ..The second is a morphometric analysis of the first upper molar of OR-1. The results of both analyses suggest the dentition of OR-1 is essentially Neandertal...
  10. ncbi request reprint Human cranial anatomy and the differential preservation of population history and climate signatures
    Katerina Harvati
    Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 288:1225-33. 2006
    ..Because different cranial regions preserve population history and climate signatures differentially, caution is suggested when using cranial anatomy for phylogenetic reconstruction...
  11. ncbi request reprint Multivariate apportionment of global human craniometric diversity
    Charles C Roseman
    Department of Anthropological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2117, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 125:257-63. 2004
    ..Moreover, these results have implications for assessing the biological affinities of prehistoric samples that are temporally separated from contemporary human reference populations...
  12. ncbi request reprint The evolution of human running: effects of changes in lower-limb length on locomotor economy
    Karen L Steudel-Numbers
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:191-6. 2007
    ..Contrary to general expectation, a linear relationship between stride length and lower-limb length was not found...
  13. ncbi request reprint Brief communication: infracranial maturation in the skeletal collection from Coimbra, Portugal: new aging standards for epiphyseal union
    Hélène Coqueugniot
    UMR 5199 PACEA, Laboratoire d Anthropologie des Populations du Passé, Universite Bordeaux 1, Avenue des Facultes, 33405 Talence Cedex, France
    Am J Phys Anthropol 134:424-37. 2007
    ..We further discuss developmental differences between the sexes and similarities and differences between the Coimbra documented collection and other published aging standards...
  14. pmc The shape of the Neandertal femur is primarily the consequence of a hyperpolar body form
    Timothy D Weaver
    Department of Anthropological Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Building 360, Stanford, CA 94305 2117, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:6926-9. 2003
    ..These results, considered in light of hip mechanics during growth, highlight the importance of developmental and functional integration in determining skeletal form...