Joel S Warm

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cincinnati
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Vigilance requires hard mental work and is stressful
    Joel S Warm
    Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 0376, USA
    Hum Factors 50:433-41. 2008
  2. doi request reprint Task engagement, cerebral blood flow velocity, and diagnostic monitoring for sustained attention
    Gerald Matthews
    Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 0376, USA
    J Exp Psychol Appl 16:187-203. 2010
  3. ncbi request reprint The vigilance decrement reflects limitations in effortful attention, not mindlessness
    Rebecca A Grier
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221, USA
    Hum Factors 45:349-59. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of sensory modality and task duration on performance, workload, and stress in sustained attention
    James L Szalma
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, P O Box 161390, Orlando, FL 32816 1390, USA
    Hum Factors 46:219-33. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Signal regularity and the mindlessness model of vigilance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
    Br J Psychol 96:249-61. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Signal salience and the mindlessness theory of vigilance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 129:18-25. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Training for vigilance: using predictive power to evaluate feedback effectiveness
    James L Szalma
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, P O Box 161390, Orlando 32816 1390, USA
    Hum Factors 48:682-92. 2006
  8. doi request reprint Effects of warned and unwarned demand transitions on vigilance performance and stress
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
    Anxiety Stress Coping 21:173-84. 2008
  9. doi request reprint Symposium: Neuroergonomics, technology, and cognition
    Raja Parasuraman
    Department of Psychology, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
    Work 41:5167-71. 2012
  10. ncbi request reprint Event-related cerebral hemodynamics reveal target-specific resource allocation for both "go" and "no-go" response-based vigilance tasks
    Tyler H Shaw
    Center of Excellence in Neuroergonomics, Technology, and Cognition CENTEC, George Mason University, Department of Psychology, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA, USA
    Brain Cogn 82:265-73. 2013

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. ncbi request reprint Vigilance requires hard mental work and is stressful
    Joel S Warm
    Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 0376, USA
    Hum Factors 50:433-41. 2008
    ..We describe major discoveries and developments in vigilance research...
  2. doi request reprint Task engagement, cerebral blood flow velocity, and diagnostic monitoring for sustained attention
    Gerald Matthews
    Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 0376, USA
    J Exp Psychol Appl 16:187-203. 2010
    ..Use of a diagnostic task battery in military and transportation settings is discussed, along with some potential limitations on validity of the diagnostic test...
  3. ncbi request reprint The vigilance decrement reflects limitations in effortful attention, not mindlessness
    Rebecca A Grier
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221, USA
    Hum Factors 45:349-59. 2003
    ..Actual or potential applications of this research include procedures to reduce the information-processing demand imposed by vigilance tasks and the stress associated with such tasks...
  4. ncbi request reprint Effects of sensory modality and task duration on performance, workload, and stress in sustained attention
    James L Szalma
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, P O Box 161390, Orlando, FL 32816 1390, USA
    Hum Factors 46:219-33. 2004
    ..Actual or potential applications of this research include domains in which monitoring is a crucial part, such as baggage screening, security operations, medical monitoring, and power plant operations...
  5. ncbi request reprint Signal regularity and the mindlessness model of vigilance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
    Br J Psychol 96:249-61. 2005
    ..Such expectations enhance performance on the traditional vigilance task, but degrade performance on the modified task...
  6. ncbi request reprint Signal salience and the mindlessness theory of vigilance
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 129:18-25. 2008
    ..The results support a resource theory perspective in regards to the vigilance decrement and are in contradiction to the mindlessness theory in regards to the vigilance decrement...
  7. ncbi request reprint Training for vigilance: using predictive power to evaluate feedback effectiveness
    James L Szalma
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, P O Box 161390, Orlando 32816 1390, USA
    Hum Factors 48:682-92. 2006
    ..We examined the effects of knowledge of results (KR) on vigilance accuracy and report the first use of positive and negative predictive power (PPP and NPP) to assess vigilance training effectiveness...
  8. doi request reprint Effects of warned and unwarned demand transitions on vigilance performance and stress
    William S Helton
    Department of Psychology, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
    Anxiety Stress Coping 21:173-84. 2008
    ..A dynamic model of performance stress may be necessary and research employing vigilance tasks in the future may be useful for developing this performance-stress model...
  9. doi request reprint Symposium: Neuroergonomics, technology, and cognition
    Raja Parasuraman
    Department of Psychology, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
    Work 41:5167-71. 2012
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Event-related cerebral hemodynamics reveal target-specific resource allocation for both "go" and "no-go" response-based vigilance tasks
    Tyler H Shaw
    Center of Excellence in Neuroergonomics, Technology, and Cognition CENTEC, George Mason University, Department of Psychology, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA, USA
    Brain Cogn 82:265-73. 2013
    ....
  11. doi request reprint A transcranial Doppler sonography study of shoot/don't-shoot responding
    Natasha B Schultz
    Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30302 5010, USA
    Behav Res Methods 41:593-7. 2009
    ..Hemovelocity slowed across the left and right hemispheres as the task progressed, and hemovelocity was slower in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere...
  12. doi request reprint Mental workload and stress perceived by novice operators in the laparoscopic and robotic minimally invasive surgical interfaces
    Martina I Klein
    Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409, USA
    J Endourol 26:1089-94. 2012
    ..A detailed understanding of trainees' mental workload and mental stress experiences can aid in the development of training programs that are aimed at facilitating the acquisition of laparoscopic and robotic surgery skills...
  13. ncbi request reprint +Gz acceleration loss of consciousness: time course of performance deficits with repeated experience
    Lloyd D Tripp
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Hum Factors 48:109-20. 2006
    ..We examine the time course of performance recovery from gravity-induced loss of consciousness (GLOC) and evaluate the utility of exposing participants to repeated bouts of GLOC in promoting recovery time...
  14. doi request reprint Active and passive fatigue in simulated driving: discriminating styles of workload regulation and their safety impacts
    Dyani J Saxby
    Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati
    J Exp Psychol Appl 19:287-300. 2013
    ..The distinction between active and passive fatigue is important for assessment of fatigue and for evaluating automated driving systems which may induce dangerous levels of passive fatigue...
  15. ncbi request reprint Fundamental dimensions of subjective state in performance settings: task engagement, distress, and worry
    Gerald Matthews
    Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Ohio 45221, USA
    Emotion 2:315-40. 2002
    ..Study 3 showed that states are correlated with differing patterns of appraisal and coping. The 3 stress state dimensions provide a general descriptive framework consistent with transactional accounts of stress and performance...
  16. ncbi request reprint Loudness adaptation: fact or artifact?
    Keith S Jones
    Department of Psychology, Kansas State University, USA
    J Gen Psychol 130:341-58. 2003
    ..Thus, the results of the study testified to the validity of the ICP as a contrast-free measure of broad-based loudness adaptation...
  17. ncbi request reprint Perceptual distortions produce multidimensional stress profiles in novice users of an endoscopic surgery simulator
    Martina I Klein
    Waldorf College, Forest City, Iowa, USA
    Hum Factors 50:291-300. 2008
    ..We determine the impact of perceptual-motor distortions on multidimensional stress dynamics in novice users of an endoscopic/laparoscopic surgery simulator during performance of a peg-transfer task...
  18. ncbi request reprint Training for vigilance: the effect of knowledge of results format and dispositional optimism and pessimism on performance and stress
    James L Szalma
    Department of Psychology and Institute for Simulation and Training, University of Central Florida Orlando 32826, USA
    Br J Psychol 97:115-35. 2006
    ..However, the effects of KR-format on self-reports of stress depended on the individual's level of pessimism and optimism. In addition, KR format and personality affected the multiple dimensions of stress state in different ways...
  19. ncbi request reprint A dynamic model of stress and sustained attention
    Peter A Hancock
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Hum Perf Extrem Environ 7:15-28. 2003
    ..With recognition of the task itself as the major source of cognitive stress, a dynamic model is presented that addresses the effects of stress on vigilance and, potentially, a wide variety of attention performance tasks...
  20. ncbi request reprint The abbreviated vigilance task and cerebral hemodynamics
    William S Helton
    Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
    J Clin Exp Neuropsychol 29:545-52. 2007
    ..This latter finding does not match the physiological changes detected in long-duration vigils...
  21. ncbi request reprint Target acquisition with UAVs: vigilance displays and advanced cuing interfaces
    Daniel V Gunn
    Microsoft Game Studios, Redmond, WA 98052, USA
    Hum Factors 47:488-97. 2005
    ....