Randy Thornhill

Summary

Affiliation: University of New Mexico
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases in relation to human personality and societal values: support for the parasite-stress model
    Randy Thornhill
    Department of Biology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
    Evol Psychol 8:151-69. 2010
  2. pmc Parasite stress promotes homicide and child maltreatment
    Randy Thornhill
    Department of Biology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:3466-77. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Parasites, democratization, and the liberalization of values across contemporary countries
    Randy Thornhill
    Department of Biology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 0001, USA
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 84:113-31. 2009
  4. pmc Pathogen prevalence predicts human cross-cultural variability in individualism/collectivism
    Corey L Fincher
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:1279-85. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint The parasite-stress theory may be a general theory of culture and sociality
    Corey L Fincher
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Behav Brain Sci 35:99-119. 2012
  6. doi request reprint Parasite-stress promotes in-group assortative sociality: the cases of strong family ties and heightened religiosity
    Corey L Fincher
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Behav Brain Sci 35:61-79. 2012
  7. pmc Parasite prevalence and the worldwide distribution of cognitive ability
    Christopher Eppig
    Biology Department MSC03 2020, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 277:3801-8. 2010
  8. pmc Women's sexual interests across the ovulatory cycle depend on primary partner developmental instability
    Steven W Gangestad
    Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87111, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2023-7. 2005
  9. pmc Human oestrus
    Steven W Gangestad
    Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:991-1000. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Major histocompatibility complex alleles, sexual responsivity, and unfaithfulness in romantic couples
    Christine E Garver-Apgar
    Department of Psychology, Univerrsity of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:830-5. 2006

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. ncbi request reprint Zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases in relation to human personality and societal values: support for the parasite-stress model
    Randy Thornhill
    Department of Biology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
    Evol Psychol 8:151-69. 2010
    ....
  2. pmc Parasite stress promotes homicide and child maltreatment
    Randy Thornhill
    Department of Biology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:3466-77. 2011
    ..Parasite stress may be the strongest predictor of interpersonal violence to date...
  3. doi request reprint Parasites, democratization, and the liberalization of values across contemporary countries
    Randy Thornhill
    Department of Biology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 0001, USA
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 84:113-31. 2009
    ..Finally, we hypothesize that past selection in the context of morbidity and mortality resulting from parasitic disease crafted many of the aspects of social psychology unique to humans...
  4. pmc Pathogen prevalence predicts human cross-cultural variability in individualism/collectivism
    Corey L Fincher
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:1279-85. 2008
    ..These results help to explain the origin of a paradigmatic cross-cultural difference, and reveal previously undocumented consequences of pathogenic diseases on the variable nature of human societies...
  5. ncbi request reprint The parasite-stress theory may be a general theory of culture and sociality
    Corey L Fincher
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Behav Brain Sci 35:99-119. 2012
    ..Here, we respond to criticisms from commentators and attempt to clarify and expand the parasite-stress theory of sociality used to fuel our research presented in the target article...
  6. doi request reprint Parasite-stress promotes in-group assortative sociality: the cases of strong family ties and heightened religiosity
    Corey L Fincher
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Behav Brain Sci 35:61-79. 2012
    ..The findings support the parasite-stress theory of sociality, that is, the proposal that parasite-stress is central to the evolution of social life in humans and other animals...
  7. pmc Parasite prevalence and the worldwide distribution of cognitive ability
    Christopher Eppig
    Biology Department MSC03 2020, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 277:3801-8. 2010
    ..These findings suggest that the Flynn effect may be caused in part by the decrease in the intensity of infectious diseases as nations develop...
  8. pmc Women's sexual interests across the ovulatory cycle depend on primary partner developmental instability
    Steven W Gangestad
    Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87111, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2023-7. 2005
    ....
  9. pmc Human oestrus
    Steven W Gangestad
    Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:991-1000. 2008
    ..Men are particularly attracted to some features of fertile-phase women, but probably based on by-products of physiological changes males have been selected to detect, not because women signal their cycle-based fertility status...
  10. ncbi request reprint Major histocompatibility complex alleles, sexual responsivity, and unfaithfulness in romantic couples
    Christine E Garver-Apgar
    Department of Psychology, Univerrsity of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:830-5. 2006
    ....
  11. pmc Changes in women's sexual interests and their partners' mate-retention tactics across the menstrual cycle: evidence for shifting conflicts of interest
    Steven W Gangestad
    Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 269:975-82. 2002
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Does infectious disease cause global variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war?
    Kenneth Letendre
    Department of Biology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 0001, USA
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 85:669-83. 2010
    ..We consider the entanglements of feedback of conflict into further reduced wealth and increased incidence of disease, and discuss implications for international warfare and global patterns of wealth and imperialism...
  13. pmc Assortative sociality, limited dispersal, infectious disease and the genesis of the global pattern of religion diversity
    Corey L Fincher
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2587-94. 2008
    ....