Amanda L Thompson

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc The critical period of infant feeding for the development of early disparities in obesity
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA Electronic address
    Soc Sci Med 97:288-96. 2013
  2. pmc Pressuring and restrictive feeding styles influence infant feeding and size among a low-income African-American sample
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 21:562-71. 2013
  3. pmc Maternal characteristics and perception of temperament associated with infant TV exposure
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, 123 W Franklin St, CB 8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Pediatrics 131:e390-7. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Developmental origins of obesity: early feeding environments, infant growth, and the intestinal microbiome
    Amanda L Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 24:350-60. 2012
  5. pmc Development and validation of the Infant Feeding Style Questionnaire
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Appetite 53:210-21. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Measurement of testosterone in infant fecal samples
    Amanda L Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 23:820-2. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in the relationships among weight gain, subcutaneous skinfold tissue and saltatory length growth spurts in infancy
    Michelle Lampl
    Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Pediatr Res 58:1238-42. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Early determinants of non-exclusive breastfeeding among Guatemalan infants
    Daniel W Sellen
    Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 554:299-301. 2004
  9. pmc Who's feeding baby? Non-maternal involvement in feeding and its association with dietary intakes among infants and toddlers
    Heather M Wasser
    Center for Women s Health Research, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 104B Market Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, United States Electronic address
    Appetite 71:7-15. 2013
  10. pmc Non-invasive methods for estradiol recovery from infant fecal samples
    Amanda L Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Front Physiol 1:148. 2010

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. pmc The critical period of infant feeding for the development of early disparities in obesity
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA Electronic address
    Soc Sci Med 97:288-96. 2013
    ..Given the intractability of pediatric obesity, understanding the role of early feeding in shaping long-term health disparities is critical for developing prevention strategies to stem obesity in early childhood...
  2. pmc Pressuring and restrictive feeding styles influence infant feeding and size among a low-income African-American sample
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 21:562-71. 2013
    ..Parental feeding styles and the attitudes and behaviors that characterize parental approaches to maintaining or modifying children's eating behavior are an important behavioral component shaping early obesity risk...
  3. pmc Maternal characteristics and perception of temperament associated with infant TV exposure
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, 123 W Franklin St, CB 8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Pediatrics 131:e390-7. 2013
    ..This study examines the development of television (TV) behaviors across the first 18 months of life and identifies maternal and infant predictors of infant TV exposure...
  4. doi request reprint Developmental origins of obesity: early feeding environments, infant growth, and the intestinal microbiome
    Amanda L Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 24:350-60. 2012
    ..This article argues that these biological mechanisms interact with the social and behavioral context of infant feeding to create differential vulnerability to later obesity...
  5. pmc Development and validation of the Infant Feeding Style Questionnaire
    Amanda L Thompson
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Appetite 53:210-21. 2009
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Measurement of testosterone in infant fecal samples
    Amanda L Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 23:820-2. 2011
    ..This study reports the validation of a noninvasive method for repeated assessment of testosterone from infant fecal samples...
  7. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in the relationships among weight gain, subcutaneous skinfold tissue and saltatory length growth spurts in infancy
    Michelle Lampl
    Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Pediatr Res 58:1238-42. 2005
    ..These data generate the hypothesis that a common growth signal cascade couples growth in weight and length/height with a time delay due to sex-specific biology, reflected in a s.c. fat fold interface...
  8. ncbi request reprint Early determinants of non-exclusive breastfeeding among Guatemalan infants
    Daniel W Sellen
    Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 554:299-301. 2004
  9. pmc Who's feeding baby? Non-maternal involvement in feeding and its association with dietary intakes among infants and toddlers
    Heather M Wasser
    Center for Women s Health Research, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 104B Market Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, United States Electronic address
    Appetite 71:7-15. 2013
    ..Given the high prevalence of non-maternal involvement in feeding, interventions targeting multiple family members are warranted as they are likely to be more effective than those targeting the mother alone...
  10. pmc Non-invasive methods for estradiol recovery from infant fecal samples
    Amanda L Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Front Physiol 1:148. 2010
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Growth chart curves do not describe individual growth biology
    Michelle Lampl
    Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 19:643-53. 2007
    ..Further characterization of individual growth patterns will contribute to increased understanding of both individual growth biology and the nature of adaptability...
  12. doi request reprint Beyond the Paleolithic prescription: incorporating diversity and flexibility in the study of human diet evolution
    Bethany L Turner
    Department of Anthropology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30302, USA
    Nutr Rev 71:501-10. 2013
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Prenatal and postnatal energetic conditions and sex steroids levels across the first year of life
    Amanda L Thompson
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27599 Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27516
    Am J Hum Biol 25:643-54. 2013
    ..Thus, we examined the impact of maternal characteristics, birth size, and feeding practices on fecal sex steroid production in a longitudinal sample of 31 American infants followed from 2 weeks to 12 months of age...