Joshua J Tewksbury

Summary

Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Costs and benefits of capsaicin-mediated control of gut retention in dispersers of wild chilies
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, 106 Kincaid Hall, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Ecology 89:107-17. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Where did the chili get its spice? Biogeography of capsaicinoid production in ancestral wild chili species
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195, USA
    J Chem Ecol 32:547-64. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Tests of landscape influence: nest predation and brood parasitism in fragmented ecosystems
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, 106 Kincaid Hall, Box 351800, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Ecology 87:759-68. 2006
  4. pmc Evolutionary ecology of pungency in wild chilies
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Box 351800, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:11808-11. 2008
  5. pmc The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes
    Ellen I Damschen
    Department of Biology, Washington University, Campus Box 1137, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:19078-83. 2008
  6. pmc Why tropical forest lizards are vulnerable to climate warming
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, PO Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1939-48. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Ecology. Putting the heat on tropical animals
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 320:1296-7. 2008
  8. pmc 'Natural experiment' demonstrates top-down control of spiders by birds on a landscape level
    Haldre Rogers
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e43446. 2012
  9. pmc Why are not all chilies hot? A trade-off limits pungency
    David C Haak
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, PO Box 351800, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2012-7. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Latitudinal variation in subspecific diversification of birds
    Paul R Martin
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Box 351800, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Evolution 62:2775-88. 2008

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. ncbi request reprint Costs and benefits of capsaicin-mediated control of gut retention in dispersers of wild chilies
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, 106 Kincaid Hall, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Ecology 89:107-17. 2008
    ..These results illustrate the importance of context in studies of fruit secondary metabolites. The same chemical can have different impacts on plant fitness depending on its morphological, physiological, and ecological context...
  2. ncbi request reprint Where did the chili get its spice? Biogeography of capsaicinoid production in ancestral wild chili species
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195, USA
    J Chem Ecol 32:547-64. 2006
    ..Determining the selection pressures behind such shifts is necessary to understand the evolution of pungency in chilies...
  3. ncbi request reprint Tests of landscape influence: nest predation and brood parasitism in fragmented ecosystems
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, 106 Kincaid Hall, Box 351800, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Ecology 87:759-68. 2006
    ..Accurate predictions regarding landscape effects on nest predation and brood parasitism will require an increased appreciation of the multiple scales at which landscape components influence predator and parasite behavior...
  4. pmc Evolutionary ecology of pungency in wild chilies
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Box 351800, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:11808-11. 2008
    ..These results suggest that the pungency in chilies may be an adaptive response to selection by a microbial pathogen, supporting the influence of microbial consumers on fruit chemistry...
  5. pmc The movement ecology and dynamics of plant communities in fragmented landscapes
    Ellen I Damschen
    Department of Biology, Washington University, Campus Box 1137, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:19078-83. 2008
    ....
  6. pmc Why tropical forest lizards are vulnerable to climate warming
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, PO Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1939-48. 2009
    ..Forest lizards are key components of tropical ecosystems, but appear vulnerable to the cascading physiological and ecological effects of climate warming, even though rates of tropical warming may be relatively low...
  7. doi request reprint Ecology. Putting the heat on tropical animals
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 320:1296-7. 2008
  8. pmc 'Natural experiment' demonstrates top-down control of spiders by birds on a landscape level
    Haldre Rogers
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e43446. 2012
    ..Overall, our results suggest that effect sizes from smaller-scale experimental studies may significantly underestimate the impact of bird loss on spider density as demonstrated by this large-scale natural experiment...
  9. pmc Why are not all chilies hot? A trade-off limits pungency
    David C Haak
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, PO Box 351800, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2012-7. 2012
    ..003), thereby reducing gas exchange under WS conditions. These results demonstrate the importance of trait integration in constraining adaptive divergence among populations...
  10. doi request reprint Latitudinal variation in subspecific diversification of birds
    Paul R Martin
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Box 351800, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Evolution 62:2775-88. 2008
    ..If subspecies density provides an index of rates of incipient speciation, then our results support evolutionary hypotheses for the latitudinal diversity gradient that invoke higher tropical speciation rates...
  11. doi request reprint When condition trumps location: seed consumption by fruit-eating birds removes pathogens and predator attractants
    Evan C Fricke
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Ecol Lett 16:1031-6. 2013
    ..These results call into question the pre-eminence of escape as the primary advantage of dispersal within populations and document two overlooked mechanisms by which frugivores can benefit fruiting plants. ..
  12. ncbi request reprint Habitat patch shape, not corridors, determines herbivory and fruit production of an annual plant
    Daniel M Evans
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, 24 Kincaid Hall, Box 351800, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Ecology 93:1016-25. 2012
    ..Thus habitat quality, governed by patch shape, can be more important than connectivity for determining levels of herbivory and the impact of herbivory on plant fitness in fragmented landscapes...
  13. doi request reprint Climate change and community disassembly: impacts of warming on tropical and temperate montane community structure
    Kimberly S Sheldon
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Ecol Lett 14:1191-200. 2011
    ..Finally, projected community disassembly was higher for ectotherms than endotherms, although the variation among ectotherms was greater than the variation separating endotherms and ectotherms...
  14. pmc Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats
    Lars A Brudvig
    Department of Biology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:9328-32. 2009
    ..By extending economically driven spillover concepts from marine fisheries and crop pollination systems, we show how reconnecting landscapes amplifies biodiversity conservation both within and beyond reserve borders...
  15. doi request reprint Connectivity planning to address climate change
    Tristan A Nuñez
    School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98115, U S A
    Conserv Biol 27:407-16. 2013
    ..Planificación de Conectividad para Atender el Cambio Climático...
  16. pmc Can terrestrial ectotherms escape the heat of climate change by moving?
    Lauren B Buckley
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20131149. 2013
    ..The benefits of movement for escaping climate change are particularly limited in the tropics, where fitness impacts will be most severe. The potential of movement to lessen climate change impacts may have been overestimated...
  17. pmc Impacts of climate warming on terrestrial ectotherms across latitude
    Curtis A Deutsch
    Program on Climate Change and Department of Oceanography and Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:6668-72. 2008
    ..Our analyses imply that, in the absence of ameliorating factors such as migration and adaptation, the greatest extinction risks from global warming may be in the tropics, where biological diversity is also greatest...
  18. ncbi request reprint Corridors increase plant species richness at large scales
    Ellen I Damschen
    Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 7617, USA
    Science 313:1284-6. 2006
    ..Our results support the use of corridors in biodiversity conservation...
  19. ncbi request reprint A field test of the directed deterrence hypothesis in two species of wild chili
    Douglas J Levey
    Department of Zoology, University of Florida, 118525, Gainesville, FL 32611 8525, USA
    Oecologia 150:61-8. 2006
    ..annuum). These results support the directed deterrence hypothesis and suggest that fruiting plants distinguish between seed predators and seed dispersers by producing fruits that repel the former and attract the latter...
  20. ncbi request reprint Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds
    Douglas J Levey
    Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Post Office Box 118525, Gainesville, FL 32611 8525, USA
    Science 309:146-8. 2005
    ..Our study shows how models based on easily observed behaviors can be scaled up to predict landscape-level processes...
  21. pmc Corridors affect plants, animals, and their interactions in fragmented landscapes
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Zoology, 223 Bartram Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 8525, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:12923-6. 2002
    ....
  22. pmc Parental care of a cowbird host: caught between the costs of egg-removal and nest predation
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, Avian Studies Program, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 269:423-9. 2002
    ....