Max Teplitski

Summary

Affiliation: University of Florida
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Factors that affect proliferation of Salmonella in tomatoes post-harvest: the roles of seasonal effects, irrigation regime, crop and pathogen genotype
    Massimiliano Marvasi
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e80871. 2013
  2. pmc Specific responses of Salmonella enterica to tomato varieties and fruit ripeness identified by in vivo expression technology
    Jason T Noel
    Soil and Water Science Department, Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12406. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Untangling metabolic and communication networks: interactions of enterics with phytobacteria and their implications in produce safety
    Max Teplitski
    Soil and Water Science Department, Genetics Institute, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL, USA
    Trends Microbiol 19:121-7. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Human enteric pathogens in produce: un-answered ecological questions with direct implications for food safety
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 20:166-71. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Biological approaches for controlling shellfish-associated pathogens
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences IFAS, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 20:185-90. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint How feasible is the biological control of coral diseases?
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 24:378-85. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Contribution of the SirA regulon to biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium
    Max Teplitski
    Soil and Water Science Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 0290, USA
    Microbiology 152:3411-24. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Catabolite repression of the SirA regulatory cascade in Salmonella enterica
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 0290, USA
    Int J Med Microbiol 296:449-66. 2006
  9. doi request reprint Differential regulation of Salmonella typhimurium genes involved in O-antigen capsule production and their role in persistence within tomato fruit
    Massimiliano Marvasi
    Soil and Water Science Department, Genetics Institute Rm330E, 2033 Mowry Rd, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville 32611, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 26:793-800. 2013
  10. doi request reprint Characterization of the gacA-dependent surface and coral mucus colonization by an opportunistic coral pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100
    Cory J Krediet
    Interdisciplinary Ecology, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL 32610 3610, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 84:290-301. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications36

  1. pmc Factors that affect proliferation of Salmonella in tomatoes post-harvest: the roles of seasonal effects, irrigation regime, crop and pathogen genotype
    Massimiliano Marvasi
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e80871. 2013
    ..The goal of this study was to test how irrigation levels, fruit water congestion, crop and pathogen genotypes affect the ability of Salmonella to multiply in tomatoes post-harvest...
  2. pmc Specific responses of Salmonella enterica to tomato varieties and fruit ripeness identified by in vivo expression technology
    Jason T Noel
    Soil and Water Science Department, Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12406. 2010
    ..Genetic and physiological pathways, by which enterics colonize plants, are still poorly understood...
  3. doi request reprint Untangling metabolic and communication networks: interactions of enterics with phytobacteria and their implications in produce safety
    Max Teplitski
    Soil and Water Science Department, Genetics Institute, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL, USA
    Trends Microbiol 19:121-7. 2011
    ..In this review, we attempt to elucidate the mechanisms of interactions between human enteric pathogens and plant-associated microbiota, and describe how these interactions affect produce safety...
  4. doi request reprint Human enteric pathogens in produce: un-answered ecological questions with direct implications for food safety
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 20:166-71. 2009
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Biological approaches for controlling shellfish-associated pathogens
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences IFAS, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 20:185-90. 2009
    ..that are pathogenic to humans. Further investigations will reveal whether combining depuration with chemical disruption of bacterial attachment or cell-to-cell signaling may accomplish this goal...
  6. ncbi request reprint How feasible is the biological control of coral diseases?
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 24:378-85. 2009
    ..Monitoring native coral-associated microbiota for functions associated with resistance to pathogens could also serve as an additional indicator of reef health...
  7. ncbi request reprint Contribution of the SirA regulon to biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium
    Max Teplitski
    Soil and Water Science Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 0290, USA
    Microbiology 152:3411-24. 2006
    ..In turn, csrB and csrC promote the translation of the fim operon, while at the same time inhibiting the translation of flagella, which are inhibitory to biofilm formation...
  8. ncbi request reprint Catabolite repression of the SirA regulatory cascade in Salmonella enterica
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Soil and Water Science, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 0290, USA
    Int J Med Microbiol 296:449-66. 2006
    ..Although SirA does not regulate csrA, this gene was also under crp/cya control. Supplementation of a rich medium with phosphate diminished the catabolite control of the csr portion but not the virulence portion of the SirA regulon...
  9. doi request reprint Differential regulation of Salmonella typhimurium genes involved in O-antigen capsule production and their role in persistence within tomato fruit
    Massimiliano Marvasi
    Soil and Water Science Department, Genetics Institute Rm330E, 2033 Mowry Rd, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville 32611, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 26:793-800. 2013
    ..These experiments suggest a role for functional ethylene-mediated signaling in the persistence of Salmonella spp. within tomato fruit. Furthermore, jasmonic acid and its precursors strongly reduced expression of yihT...
  10. doi request reprint Characterization of the gacA-dependent surface and coral mucus colonization by an opportunistic coral pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100
    Cory J Krediet
    Interdisciplinary Ecology, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL 32610 3610, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 84:290-301. 2013
    ..marcescens PDL100 in either a model polyp Aiptasia pallida or in brine shrimp Artemia nauplii...
  11. pmc Members of native coral microbiota inhibit glycosidases and thwart colonization of coral mucus by an opportunistic pathogen
    Cory J Krediet
    Interdisciplinary Ecology, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
    ISME J 7:980-90. 2013
    ..These results provide insight into potential mechanisms of commensal interference with early colonization and infection behaviors in opportunistic pathogens and highlight an important function for the native microbiota in coral health...
  12. doi request reprint Catabolite regulation of enzymatic activities in a white pox pathogen and commensal bacteria during growth on mucus polymers from the coral Acropora palmata
    Cory J Krediet
    Interdisciplinary Ecology Graduate Program, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences IFAS, 103 Black Hall, PO Box 116455, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA
    Dis Aquat Organ 87:57-66. 2009
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Consequences of disrupting Salmonella AI-2 signaling on interactions within soft rots
    Clayton E Cox
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
    Phytopathology 103:352-61. 2013
    ..The results of this study show that AI-2 signaling offers no significant benefit to Salmonella spp. in this model of colonization of tomato or soft rots...
  14. pmc Signaling-mediated cross-talk modulates swarming and biofilm formation in a coral pathogen Serratia marcescens
    Ali Alagely
    Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
    ISME J 5:1609-20. 2011
    ..marcescens...
  15. doi request reprint RIVET-a tool for in vivo analysis of symbiotically relevant gene expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti
    Mengsheng Gao
    Soil and Water Science Department Cancer and Genetics Research Complex, Rm 330E, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 21:162-70. 2008
    ..AHL synthase sinI and an AHL-regulated gene, expG, were activated inside the nodules...
  16. ncbi request reprint Interactions between the tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pallida and Serratia marcescens, an opportunistic pathogen of corals
    Cory J Krediet
    Interdisciplinary Ecology Graduate Program, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA
    Environ Microbiol Rep 6:287-92. 2014
    ..pallida infection model. In co-infections with the wild-type strain, the tetrathionate reductase mutant was less fit within the surface mucopolysaccharide layer of the host coral Acropora palmata. ..
  17. ncbi request reprint Effects of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on the susceptibility of tomatoes to post-harvest proliferation of Salmonella enterica
    Massimiliano Marvasi
    Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
    Food Microbiol 43:20-7. 2014
    ..Tomato phenolics, accumulation of which is known to correlate with rates of the N fertilization, did not inhibit growth of Salmonella in vitro. ..
  18. pmc Coral-associated micro-organisms and their roles in promoting coral health and thwarting diseases
    Cory J Krediet
    Interdisciplinary Ecology, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20122328. 2013
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Role of the Sinorhizobium meliloti global regulator Hfq in gene regulation and symbiosis
    Mengsheng Gao
    Soil and Water Science Department, Cancer and Genetics Research Complex, Room 330E, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville 32610, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 23:355-65. 2010
    ..A deletion of hfq resulted in a reduced symbiotic efficiency, although the mutant was still able to initiate nodule development and differentiate into bacteroids...
  20. pmc Lyngbyoic acid, a "tagged" fatty acid from a marine cyanobacterium, disrupts quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    Jason Christopher Kwan
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, Florida 32610, USA
    Mol Biosyst 7:1205-16. 2011
    ..Compound 4 may therefore prove to be a useful tool in the study of P. aeruginosa adaption during such chronic infections...
  21. pmc Role of specific quorum-sensing signals in the regulation of exopolysaccharide II production within Sinorhizobium meliloti spreading colonies
    Mengsheng Gao
    Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e42611. 2012
    ..meliloti Rm8530. The sinI gene is regulated by two LuxR-type transcriptional regulators, SinR and ExpR. Mutations in sinI, sinR and expR abolish the production of exopolysaccharide II (EPS II)...
  22. doi request reprint Role of GacA in virulence of Vibrio vulnificus
    Julie D Gauthier
    Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, 212 Aquatic Food Products Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Microbiology 156:3722-33. 2010
    ..However, the virulence of the mutant was equivalent to that of the wild-type in iron-treated mice, demonstrating that the GacA pathway in V. vulnificus regulates the virulence of this organism in an iron-dependent manner...
  23. doi request reprint Characterization of arsenic-resistant bacteria from the rhizosphere of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata
    Anhui Huang
    Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, 32601, USA
    Can J Microbiol 56:236-46. 2010
    ..Both these adaptations contribute to the high arsenic resistance in the bacterial isolates...
  24. doi request reprint Luminescent reporters and their applications for the characterization of signals and signal-mimics that alter LasR-mediated quorum sensing
    Ali Alagely
    Soil and Water Sciences Department, Genetics Institute, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 692:113-30. 2011
    ..To test the usefulness of these reporters, we carried out bioassays with patulin, a known inhibitor of Las QS...
  25. doi request reprint Temperature-dependent inhibition of opportunistic Vibrio pathogens by native coral commensal bacteria
    Beck R Frydenborg
    Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA
    Microb Ecol 67:392-401. 2014
    ..These results provide insight into potential mechanisms through which elevated temperature may select for pathogenic bacterial dominance and lead to disease or a decrease in coral fitness...
  26. doi request reprint Malyngolide from the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula interferes with quorum sensing circuitry
    Sergey Dobretsov
    Department of Marine Science and Fisheries, College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Sultanate of Oman Soil and Water Science Department, Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Smithsonian Marine Station, Fort Pierce, FL, USA
    Environ Microbiol Rep 2:739-44. 2010
    ..6 ± 1.8 µM) Las QS-dependent production of elastase by P. aeruginosa PAO1. We propose that this QS inhibitor plays a role in controlling interactions of heterotrophic bacteria associated with the cyanobacterium L. majuscula...
  27. pmc Utilization of mucus from the coral Acropora palmata by the pathogen Serratia marcescens and by environmental and coral commensal bacteria
    Cory J Krediet
    University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 75:3851-8. 2009
    ..After overnight incubation on mucus, enzymatic activities in a white pox pathogen were most similar to those in pathogenic Serratia strains isolated from human mucosal surfaces...
  28. ncbi request reprint Community Shifts in the Surface Microbiomes of the Coral Porites astreoides with Unusual Lesions
    Julie L Meyer
    Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e100316. 2014
    ..The presence of lesions in P. astreoides coincided with a decrease in the relative abundance of Endozoicomonas, rather than the appearance of specific pathogenic taxa. ..
  29. doi request reprint Spontaneous non-rdar mutations increase fitness of Salmonella in plants
    William J Zaragoza
    Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, Florida, USA
    Environ Microbiol Rep 4:453-8. 2012
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Effects of AiiA-mediated quorum quenching in Sinorhizobium meliloti on quorum-sensing signals, proteome patterns, and symbiotic interactions
    Mengsheng Gao
    Department of Soil and Water Sciences, 2159 McCarty Hall A, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611 0290, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 20:843-56. 2007
    ..This suggests some structural similarity between bacterial AHLs and these mimic compounds. It also indicates that quorum quenching could be useful in identifying Sinorhizobium genes that are affected by such host QS mimics in planta...
  31. pmc Pathways leading from BarA/SirA to motility and virulence gene expression in Salmonella
    Max Teplitski
    Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 1292, USA
    J Bacteriol 185:7257-65. 2003
    ..We propose a model in which SirA directly activates virulence expression via hilA and hilC while repressing the flagellar regulon indirectly via csrB...
  32. pmc A LuxR homolog controls production of symbiotically active extracellular polysaccharide II by Sinorhizobium meliloti
    Brett J Pellock
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Bacteriol 184:5067-76. 2002
    ..High-pressure liquid chromatographic fractionation of S. meliloti culture filtrate extracts revealed at least three peaks with AHL activity, one of which activated ExpR-dependent expression of the expE operon...
  33. pmc Chlamydomonas reinhardtii secretes compounds that mimic bacterial signals and interfere with quorum sensing regulation in bacteria
    Max Teplitski
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research Genomics Interaction Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capitol Territory 2601, Australia
    Plant Physiol 134:137-46. 2004
    ....
  34. pmc Proteomic analysis of wild-type Sinorhizobium meliloti responses to N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals and the transition to stationary phase
    Hancai Chen
    Genomic Interactions Group, Research School for Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    J Bacteriol 185:5029-36. 2003
    ..meliloti and help to establish proteomic analysis as a powerful global approach to the identification of quorum-sensing regulatory patterns in wild-type bacteria...
  35. pmc Extensive and specific responses of a eukaryote to bacterial quorum-sensing signals
    Ulrike Mathesius
    Genomic Interactions Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, GPO Box 475, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:1444-9. 2003
    ..Our results indicate that eukaryotes have an extensive range of functional responses to AHLs that may play important roles in the beneficial or pathogenic outcomes of eukaryote-prokaryote interactions...