Paul Sniegowski

Summary

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Linking mutation to adaptation: overcoming stress at the spa
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6018, USA
    New Phytol 166:360-2. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Evolvability
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6018, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R831-4. 2006
  3. pmc Beneficial mutations and the dynamics of adaptation in asexual populations
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19063, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:1255-63. 2010
  4. pmc Heterochronic evolution reveals modular timing changes in budding yeast transcriptomes
    Daniel F Simola
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 433 S, University Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Genome Biol 11:R105. 2010
  5. pmc Mutator dynamics in sexual and asexual experimental populations of yeast
    Yevgeniy Raynes
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6018, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 11:158. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Mutation rates: how low can you go?
    Paul Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19063, USA
    Curr Biol 23:R147-9. 2013
  7. ncbi request reprint Evolution: bacterial mutation in stationary phase
    Paul Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Curr Biol 14:R245-6. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Evolution of high mutation rates in experimental populations of E. coli
    P D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA
    Nature 387:703-5. 1997
  9. ncbi request reprint The evolution of mutation rates: separating causes from consequences
    P D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Bioessays 22:1057-66. 2000
  10. ncbi request reprint Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus coexist in a natural woodland site in North America and display different levels of reproductive isolation from European conspecifics
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 415 S University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    FEMS Yeast Res 1:299-306. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. ncbi request reprint Linking mutation to adaptation: overcoming stress at the spa
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6018, USA
    New Phytol 166:360-2. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Evolvability
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 6018, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R831-4. 2006
  3. pmc Beneficial mutations and the dynamics of adaptation in asexual populations
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19063, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:1255-63. 2010
    ..We provide some new theoretical results, moreover, suggesting that population dynamics consistent with the periodic selection model can arise even in a deterministic model that can accommodate a very high beneficial mutation rate...
  4. pmc Heterochronic evolution reveals modular timing changes in budding yeast transcriptomes
    Daniel F Simola
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 433 S, University Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Genome Biol 11:R105. 2010
    ..Here, we examined transcriptome evolution in the dynamical context of the budding yeast cell-division cycle, to investigate the extent of divergence in expression timing and the regulatory architecture underlying timing evolution...
  5. pmc Mutator dynamics in sexual and asexual experimental populations of yeast
    Yevgeniy Raynes
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 6018, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 11:158. 2011
    ..To investigate the effect of recombination on mutators experimentally, we compared the frequency dynamics of a mutator allele (msh2Δ) in sexual and asexual populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae...
  6. doi request reprint Mutation rates: how low can you go?
    Paul Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19063, USA
    Curr Biol 23:R147-9. 2013
    ..The results are broadly consistent with the hypothesis that genetic drift plays a role in shaping genomic mutation rates across a wide range of taxa...
  7. ncbi request reprint Evolution: bacterial mutation in stationary phase
    Paul Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Curr Biol 14:R245-6. 2004
    ..These findings are important in the light of the ongoing controversy over the generality and robustness of stationary phase mutagenesis and its evolutionary implications...
  8. ncbi request reprint Evolution of high mutation rates in experimental populations of E. coli
    P D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA
    Nature 387:703-5. 1997
    ..Our results corroborate computer simulations of mutator evolution in adapting clonal populations, and may help to explain observations that associate high mutation rates with emerging pathogens and with certain cancers...
  9. ncbi request reprint The evolution of mutation rates: separating causes from consequences
    P D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Bioessays 22:1057-66. 2000
    ..Maintenance of mutation rates higher than the minimum set by this "cost of fidelity" is likely only under special circumstances...
  10. ncbi request reprint Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus coexist in a natural woodland site in North America and display different levels of reproductive isolation from European conspecifics
    Paul D Sniegowski
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 415 S University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    FEMS Yeast Res 1:299-306. 2002
    ..We discuss the relevance of our data to current debates concerning whether S. cerevisiae is a wild species or a domesticated species...
  11. ncbi request reprint Distribution and sequence analysis of a novel Ty3-like element in natural Saccharomyces paradoxus isolates
    Ethan G Fingerman
    Department of Biology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Yeast 20:761-70. 2003
    ..We comment on the possible causes of these contrasting observed distributions (GenBank Accession Nos AY198186 and AY198187)...
  12. ncbi request reprint Sympatric natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. paradoxus populations have different thermal growth profiles
    Joseph Y Sweeney
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 415 S University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    FEMS Yeast Res 4:521-5. 2004
    ....
  13. pmc Mate choice assays and mating propensity differences in natural yeast populations
    Helen A Murphy
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA19103, USA
    Biol Lett 2:553-6. 2006
    ..We briefly discuss the possibility that this mating propensity difference may contribute to reproductive isolation between S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus in nature...
  14. pmc Spontaneously arising mutL mutators in evolving Escherichia coli populations are the result of changes in repeat length
    Aaron C Shaver
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    J Bacteriol 185:6076-82. 2003
    ..The similarity of the two mutator mutations (despite the independent evolutionary histories of the populations that gave rise to them) leads to a discussion of the potential adaptive role of DNA repeats...
  15. pmc Fitness evolution and the rise of mutator alleles in experimental Escherichia coli populations
    Aaron C Shaver
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA
    Genetics 162:557-66. 2002
    ..We found little evidence that the evolution of high mutation rates accelerated adaptation in these populations...
  16. ncbi request reprint Allopatric divergence, secondary contact, and genetic isolation in wild yeast populations
    Heidi A Kuehne
    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Curr Biol 17:407-11. 2007
    ..Our data thus support the occurrence of evolutionary processes necessary for allopatric speciation in sexual microbes...
  17. pmc Complete genetic linkage can subvert natural selection
    Philip J Gerrish
    Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6266-71. 2007
    ..We discuss potential implications of this finding for the early establishment of recombination, the evolutionary fate of asexual populations, and immunological clearance of clonal pathogens...
  18. pmc Population genetic variation in gene expression is associated with phenotypic variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Justin C Fay
    Department of Genome Sciences, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Genome Biol 5:R26. 2004
    ....