Diana L Six

Summary

Affiliation: University of Montana
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint The bark beetle holobiont: why microbes matter
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, The University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA
    J Chem Ecol 39:989-1002. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Fungal associates of the lodgepole pine beetle, Dendroctonus murrayanae
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, The University of Montana, Missoula, 59812, USA
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 100:231-44. 2011
  3. doi request reprint The role of phytopathogenicity in bark beetle-fungus symbioses: a challenge to the classic paradigm
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, The University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812, USA
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:255-72. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Ambrosiella beaveri, sp. nov., associated with an exotic ambrosia beetle, Xylosandrus mutilatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), in Mississippi, USA
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 96:17-29. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Temperature determines symbiont abundance in a multipartite bark beetle-fungus ectosymbiosis
    D L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Microb Ecol 54:112-8. 2007
  6. doi request reprint In vitro interactions between yeasts and bacteria and the fungal symbionts of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)
    Aaron S Adams
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, The University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Microb Ecol 56:460-6. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Temporal variation in mycophagy and prevalence of fungi associated with developmental stages of Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
    Aaron S Adams
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Environ Entomol 36:64-72. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Dietary benefits of fungal associates to an eruptive herbivore: potential implications of multiple associates on host population dynamics
    K P Bleiker
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Science, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59801, USA
    Environ Entomol 36:1384-96. 2007
  9. doi request reprint Competition and coexistence in a multi-partner mutualism: interactions between two fungal symbionts of the mountain pine beetle in beetle-attacked trees
    K P Bleiker
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Science, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA
    Microb Ecol 57:191-202. 2009
  10. doi request reprint Effects of water potential and solute on the growth and interactions of two fungal symbionts of the mountain pine beetle
    K P Bleiker
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Science, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59801, USA
    Mycol Res 113:3-15. 2009

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint The bark beetle holobiont: why microbes matter
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, The University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA
    J Chem Ecol 39:989-1002. 2013
    ..Finally, I discuss why it will be critical to study bark beetles as a holobiont to understand the ramifications and extent of anthropogenic change in forest ecosystems. ..
  2. doi request reprint Fungal associates of the lodgepole pine beetle, Dendroctonus murrayanae
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, The University of Montana, Missoula, 59812, USA
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 100:231-44. 2011
    ..terebrantis. However, the monophyly of this lineage is not well supported and a more comprehensive study will be needed to resolve its taxonomic status as one or more novel taxa...
  3. doi request reprint The role of phytopathogenicity in bark beetle-fungus symbioses: a challenge to the classic paradigm
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, The University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812, USA
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:255-72. 2011
    ..In particular, phytopathogenicity may mediate competitive interactions among fungi and support survival and efficient resource capture in living, defensive trees...
  4. doi request reprint Ambrosiella beaveri, sp. nov., associated with an exotic ambrosia beetle, Xylosandrus mutilatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), in Mississippi, USA
    Diana L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 96:17-29. 2009
    ..nov. Also isolated were Geosmithia lavendula, G. obscura, and a yeast, Candida homelintoma. It is likely Ambrosiella beaveri was introduced along with the beetle into North America...
  5. ncbi request reprint Temperature determines symbiont abundance in a multipartite bark beetle-fungus ectosymbiosis
    D L Six
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Microb Ecol 54:112-8. 2007
    ..Such temperature-driven symbiont shifts are likely to have major consequences for both the host and its symbionts under current temperature regimes and those predicted to occur because of climate change...
  6. doi request reprint In vitro interactions between yeasts and bacteria and the fungal symbionts of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)
    Aaron S Adams
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, The University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Microb Ecol 56:460-6. 2008
    ..montium and appears to be an antagonist to both fungi. Our results suggest that bacteria and yeasts likely influence the distribution of mycangial fungi in the host tree, which, in turn, may affect the fitness of D. ponderosae...
  7. ncbi request reprint Temporal variation in mycophagy and prevalence of fungi associated with developmental stages of Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
    Aaron S Adams
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
    Environ Entomol 36:64-72. 2007
    ..Such temporal shifts in fungal symbionts may be environmentally driven and have important implications in how these fungi interact with their hosts within and across generations...
  8. ncbi request reprint Dietary benefits of fungal associates to an eruptive herbivore: potential implications of multiple associates on host population dynamics
    K P Bleiker
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Science, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59801, USA
    Environ Entomol 36:1384-96. 2007
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Competition and coexistence in a multi-partner mutualism: interactions between two fungal symbionts of the mountain pine beetle in beetle-attacked trees
    K P Bleiker
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Science, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 59801, USA
    Microb Ecol 57:191-202. 2009
    ..Each species also maintained an exclusive area, which may promote coexistence of species with similar resource use...
  10. doi request reprint Effects of water potential and solute on the growth and interactions of two fungal symbionts of the mountain pine beetle
    K P Bleiker
    Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Science, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59801, USA
    Mycol Res 113:3-15. 2009
    ....