GEOFFREY M SCHOENBAUM

Summary

Affiliation: University of Maryland School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Normal Aging does Not Impair Orbitofrontal-Dependent Reinforcer Devaluation Effects
    Teghpal Singh
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA
    Front Aging Neurosci 3:4. 2011
  2. pmc Nucleus Accumbens Core and Shell are Necessary for Reinforcer Devaluation Effects on Pavlovian Conditioned Responding
    Teghpal Singh
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland, School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA
    Front Integr Neurosci 4:126. 2010
  3. pmc Neural correlates of stimulus-response and response-outcome associations in dorsolateral versus dorsomedial striatum
    Thomas A Stalnaker
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA
    Front Integr Neurosci 4:12. 2010
  4. pmc Encoding changes in orbitofrontal cortex in reversal-impaired aged rats
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn St, HSF 2 Rm S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    J Neurophysiol 95:1509-17. 2006
  5. pmc Orbitofrontal cortex, decision-making and drug addiction
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Trends Neurosci 29:116-24. 2006
  6. pmc A new perspective on the role of the orbitofrontal cortex in adaptive behaviour
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 10:885-92. 2009
  7. ncbi Paying attention. Focus on "State-dependent modulation of time-varying gustatory responses"
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn St, HSF2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    J Neurophysiol 96:2844. 2006
  8. ncbi Lesions of nucleus accumbens disrupt learning about aversive outcomes
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    J Neurosci 23:9833-41. 2003
  9. pmc Reconciling the roles of orbitofrontal cortex in reversal learning and the encoding of outcome expectancies
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of AAnatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1121:320-35. 2007
  10. pmc The role of orbitofrontal cortex in drug addiction: a review of preclinical studies
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 63:256-62. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications47

  1. pmc Normal Aging does Not Impair Orbitofrontal-Dependent Reinforcer Devaluation Effects
    Teghpal Singh
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA
    Front Aging Neurosci 3:4. 2011
    ..This result indicates that deficits in cognitive flexibility are dissociable from other known functions of prefrontal - and particularly orbitofrontal - cortex...
  2. pmc Nucleus Accumbens Core and Shell are Necessary for Reinforcer Devaluation Effects on Pavlovian Conditioned Responding
    Teghpal Singh
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland, School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA
    Front Integr Neurosci 4:126. 2010
    ..These data suggest that NA core and shell are part of a circuit necessary for the use of cue-evoked information about expected outcomes to guide behavior...
  3. pmc Neural correlates of stimulus-response and response-outcome associations in dorsolateral versus dorsomedial striatum
    Thomas A Stalnaker
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA
    Front Integr Neurosci 4:12. 2010
    ..These results suggest that differences in information content in these two regions may not determine the differential roles they play in controlling behavior, demonstrated in previous studies...
  4. pmc Encoding changes in orbitofrontal cortex in reversal-impaired aged rats
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn St, HSF 2 Rm S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    J Neurophysiol 95:1509-17. 2006
    ..These altered features of neural encoding could provide a basis for cognitive inflexibility associated with normal aging...
  5. pmc Orbitofrontal cortex, decision-making and drug addiction
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Trends Neurosci 29:116-24. 2006
    ....
  6. pmc A new perspective on the role of the orbitofrontal cortex in adaptive behaviour
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 10:885-92. 2009
    ..We suggest that this function--signalling of expected outcomes--can also explain the crucial role of the OFC in changing behaviour in the face of unexpected outcomes...
  7. ncbi Paying attention. Focus on "State-dependent modulation of time-varying gustatory responses"
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn St, HSF2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    J Neurophysiol 96:2844. 2006
  8. ncbi Lesions of nucleus accumbens disrupt learning about aversive outcomes
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    J Neurosci 23:9833-41. 2003
    ....
  9. pmc Reconciling the roles of orbitofrontal cortex in reversal learning and the encoding of outcome expectancies
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of AAnatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1121:320-35. 2007
    ..In addition to their role in guiding behavior, these outcome expectancies permit the rapid recognition of unexpected outcomes, thereby driving new learning...
  10. pmc The role of orbitofrontal cortex in drug addiction: a review of preclinical studies
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 63:256-62. 2008
    ....
  11. ncbi Thanks for the memories
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology and Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Learn Mem 12:547-8. 2005
  12. pmc Orbitofrontal cortex, associative learning, and expectancies
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Neuron 47:633-6. 2005
    ..This contribution reflects the ability of OFC to signal the desirability of expected outcomes, which requires the integration of associative information with information concerning internal states and goals in representational memory...
  13. pmc How do you (estimate you will) like them apples? Integration as a defining trait of orbitofrontal function
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 20:205-11. 2010
    ....
  14. ncbi Cocaine-experienced rats exhibit learning deficits in a task sensitive to orbitofrontal cortex lesions
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, 685 West Baltimore Street, HSF 1 Rm 280K, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Eur J Neurosci 19:1997-2002. 2004
    ....
  15. ncbi Encoding predicted outcome and acquired value in orbitofrontal cortex during cue sampling depends upon input from basolateral amygdala
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Psychology, Johns Hopkins University, 25 Ames Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Neuron 39:855-67. 2003
    ..The results provide a neural substrate for representing acquired value and features of the predicted outcome during cue sampling, disruption of which could account for deficits in goal-directed behavior after damage to this system...
  16. ncbi Cocaine makes actions insensitive to outcomes but not extinction: implications for altered orbitofrontal-amygdalar function
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Cereb Cortex 15:1162-9. 2005
    ....
  17. ncbi A systems approach to orbitofrontal cortex function: recordings in rat orbitofrontal cortex reveal interactions with different learning systems
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 685 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Behav Brain Res 146:19-29. 2003
    ..In addition, we argue that the function of orbitofrontal cortex needs to be considered in terms of its interactions with other brain systems...
  18. ncbi Neural encoding in ventral striatum during olfactory discrimination learning
    Barry Setlow
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Neuron 38:625-36. 2003
    ..The results support a role for ventral striatum in using the learned significance, both appetitive and aversive, of predictive cues to guide behavior...
  19. pmc The orbitofrontal cortex and ventral tegmental area are necessary for learning from unexpected outcomes
    Yuji K Takahashi
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Neuron 62:269-80. 2009
    ..Furthermore, bilateral inactivation of VTA or contralateral inactivation of VTA and OFC disrupted learning driven by unexpected outcomes...
  20. pmc Inactivation of the central but not the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala disrupts learning in response to overexpectation of reward
    Richard Z Haney
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    J Neurosci 30:2911-7. 2010
    ....
  21. pmc Cocaine-induced decision-making deficits are mediated by miscoding in basolateral amygdala
    Thomas A Stalnaker
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn St, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Nat Neurosci 10:949-51. 2007
    ..Further, the presence of these neurons was critical to the expression of the reversal-learning deficit in the cocaine-treated rats...
  22. pmc Abnormal associative encoding in orbitofrontal neurons in cocaine-experienced rats during decision-making
    Thomas A Stalnaker
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn St, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Eur J Neurosci 24:2643-53. 2006
    ..These results provide direct neurophysiological evidence that exposure to cocaine can cause behaviorally relevant changes in the processing of associative information in a circuit that includes the orbitofrontal cortex...
  23. pmc Encoding of time-discounted rewards in orbitofrontal cortex is independent of value representation
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, 21201, USA
    Neuron 51:509-20. 2006
    ....
  24. pmc Associative encoding in anterior piriform cortex versus orbitofrontal cortex during odor discrimination and reversal learning
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Cereb Cortex 17:643-52. 2007
    ....
  25. pmc Dopamine neurons encode the better option in rats deciding between differently delayed or sized rewards
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Nat Neurosci 10:1615-24. 2007
    ..Moreover, when rats were given a choice between two differently valued outcomes, the activity of the neurons initially reflected the more valuable option, even when it was not subsequently selected...
  26. pmc Ventral striatal neurons encode the value of the chosen action in rats deciding between differently delayed or sized rewards
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    J Neurosci 29:13365-76. 2009
    ..These results are consistent with the notion that VS serves to integrate information about the value of an expected reward with motor output during decision making...
  27. pmc Neural correlates of variations in event processing during learning in basolateral amygdala
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    J Neurosci 30:2464-71. 2010
    ..These results suggest that basolateral amygdala serves a critical function in attention for learning...
  28. ncbi Orbitofrontal lesions in rats impair reversal but not acquisition of go, no-go odor discriminations
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, 25 Ames Hall, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Neuroreport 13:885-90. 2002
    ..These findings suggest that orbitofrontal cortex is not necessary for inhibiting responses unless responses must be altered to reflect changing relationships between cues and outcomes...
  29. ncbi Rapid associative encoding in basolateral amygdala depends on connections with orbitofrontal cortex
    Michael P Saddoris
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, 25 Ames Hall, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    Neuron 46:321-31. 2005
    ..These findings support a role for OFC in facilitating the encoding of information about expected outcomes in ABL...
  30. pmc Should I stay or should I go? Transformation of time-discounted rewards in orbitofrontal cortex and associated brain circuits
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1104:21-34. 2007
    ..We suggest a dual role for output from OFC in both discounting delayed reward, while at the same time supporting new learning for them...
  31. ncbi Basolateral amygdala lesions abolish orbitofrontal-dependent reversal impairments
    Thomas A Stalnaker
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Neuron 54:51-8. 2007
    ..These results are consistent with the hypothesis that OFC facilitates cognitive flexibility by promoting updating of associative encoding in downstream brain areas...
  32. pmc Neural correlates of inflexible behavior in the orbitofrontal-amygdalar circuit after cocaine exposure
    Thomas A Stalnaker
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1121:598-609. 2007
    ..A similar mechanism of drug-induced orbitofrontal-amygdalar dysfunction may cause inflexible behavior when animals and addicts are exposed to drug-associated cues and contexts...
  33. ncbi Different roles for orbitofrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala in a reinforcer devaluation task
    Charles L Pickens
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    J Neurosci 23:11078-84. 2003
    ..In contrast, the OFC seems essential for one or more of these latter processes...
  34. pmc Orbitofrontal inactivation impairs reversal of Pavlovian learning by interfering with 'disinhibition' of responding for previously unrewarded cues
    Kathryn A Burke
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Eur J Neurosci 30:1941-6. 2009
    ....
  35. pmc Associative encoding in posterior piriform cortex during odor discrimination and reversal learning
    Donna J Calu
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Cereb Cortex 17:1342-9. 2007
    ....
  36. pmc The role of the orbitofrontal cortex in the pursuit of happiness and more specific rewards
    Kathryn A Burke
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 S251 Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Nature 454:340-4. 2008
    ..Furthermore the orbitofrontal cortex, a prefrontal region important for adaptive decision-making, was critical for the former but not for the latter form of conditioned reinforcement...
  37. ncbi Teaching old rats new tricks: age-related impairments in olfactory reversal learning
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, 25 Ames Hall, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 23:555-64. 2002
    ..These data indicate that rats show independent decline of different brain systems during normal aging and suggest orbitofrontal cortex as one prefrontal area where changes may be localized for further study...
  38. pmc Withdrawal from cocaine self-administration produces long-lasting deficits in orbitofrontal-dependent reversal learning in rats
    Donna J Calu
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    Learn Mem 14:325-8. 2007
    ..We found robust time-dependent increases in cue-induced cocaine seeking in the two extinction tests (incubation of craving) and severe reversal-learning impairments...
  39. pmc Lesions of orbitofrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala complex disrupt acquisition of odor-guided discriminations and reversals
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    Learn Mem 10:129-40. 2003
    ..These findings suggest that OFC and ABL serve partially overlapping roles in the use of incentive information that supports normal discrimination performance...
  40. pmc Double dissociation of the effects of medial and orbital prefrontal cortical lesions on attentional and affective shifts in mice
    Gregory B Bissonette
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    J Neurosci 28:11124-30. 2008
    ..These data are identical to studies in rats and similar to the deficits reported after prefrontal damage in a comparable task in marmosets. These results provide a behavioral model to assess prefrontal function in mice...
  41. pmc Previous cocaine exposure makes rats hypersensitive to both delay and reward magnitude
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA
    J Neurosci 27:245-50. 2007
    ..We conclude that previous exposure to cocaine makes choice behavior hypersensitive to differences in the time to and size of available rewards, consistent with a general effect of cocaine exposure on reward valuation mechanisms...
  42. pmc Prior cocaine exposure disrupts extinction of fear conditioning
    Kathryn A Burke
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, 21230, USA
    Learn Mem 13:416-21. 2006
    ..These results support the hypothesis that control processes in the medial prefrontal cortex are impaired by cocaine exposure...
  43. pmc Cocaine-paired cues activate aversive representations in accumbens neurons
    Donna J Calu
    Program in Neuroscience, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Neuron 57:633. 2008
    ..These remarkable data identify a potential neural substrate through which aversive affective representations may motivate drug use...
  44. pmc Neural substrates of cognitive inflexibility after chronic cocaine exposure
    Thomas A Stalnaker
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 20 Penn Street, HSF 2 Room S251, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Neuropharmacology 56:63-72. 2009
    ..These changes could explain cocaine-induced impairments to cognitive flexibility and may have theoretical importance in addiction...
  45. pmc All that glitters ... dissociating attention and outcome expectancy from prediction errors signals
    Matthew R Roesch
    Department of Psychology, Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland, USA
    J Neurophysiol 104:587-95. 2010
    ..These results have important implications for how these areas interact to facilitate learning and guide behavior...
  46. pmc Toward a model of impaired reality testing in rats
    Michael McDannald
    University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
    Schizophr Bull 35:664-7. 2009
    ..The Pavlovian procedures discussed here could be applied to animal models and schizophrenic patients to test this hypothesis...

Research Grants21

  1. Lasting Effects of Cocaine Use on Corticolimbic Funciton
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..In addition, changes in function related to other human neuropsychiatric diseases involving these areas could also be pursued using this model. ..
  2. Errors and Expectancies in OFC and VTA and their Roles in Associative Learning
    GEOFFREY M SCHOENBAUM; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This proposal will test this hypothesis, using inactivation and single-unit recording to ask how OFC is involved learning and in the calculation of prediction errors in dopaminergic VTA neurons during Pavlovian blocking. ..
  3. Role of orbitofrontal cortex and outcome expectancies in associative learning
    GEOFFREY M SCHOENBAUM; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..As such, they will clarify the role this area plays in the neuropsychiatric diseases described above and how manipulation of that role may facilitate treatment of these diseases...
  4. Corticolimbic encoding of conditioned reinforcers: relevance to addiction
    GEOFFREY M SCHOENBAUM; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..The results will provide a neuroanatomical framework with which to better understand how reward-associated cues exert effects on behavior under normal (drug-naove) conditions and after exposure to cocaine. ..
  5. Flexibility, prefrontal function, and changes with normal aging
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Improved performance may then be correlated with regional changes in neural activity, dendritic structure and innervation. ..
  6. Corticolimbic encoding of conditioned reinforcers: relevance to addiction
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The results will provide a neuroanatomical framework with which to better understand how reward-associated cues exert effects on behavior under normal (drug-naove) conditions and after exposure to cocaine. ..
  7. Flexibility, prefrontal function, and changes with normal aging
    GEOFFREY M SCHOENBAUM; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Improved performance may then be correlated with regional changes in neural activity, dendritic structure and innervation. ..
  8. Lasting Effects of Cocaine Use on Corticolimbic Funciton
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..In addition, changes in function related to other human neuropsychiatric diseases involving these areas could also be pursued using this model. ..
  9. Lasting Effects of Cocaine Use on Corticolimbic Funciton
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..In addition, changes in function related to other human neuropsychiatric diseases involving these areas could also be pursued using this model. ..
  10. Lasting Effects of Cocaine Use on Corticolimbic Funciton
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..In addition, changes in function related to other human neuropsychiatric diseases involving these areas could also be pursued using this model. ..
  11. Linking Affect to Action: Critical Contributions of the Orbitofrontal Cortex
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The participation of minorities and women has been emphasized at each level (organizers, speakers, students). Thus the conference will address important scientific, social, and educational issues. ..
  12. Lasting Effects of Cocaine Use on Corticolimbic Funciton
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..In addition, changes in function related to other human neuropsychiatric diseases involving these areas could also be pursued using this model. ..
  13. Role of orbitofrontal cortex and outcome expectancies in associative learning
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..As such, they will clarify the role this area plays in the neuropsychiatric diseases described above and how manipulation of that role may facilitate treatment of these diseases...
  14. Errors and Expectancies in OFC and VTA and their Roles in Associative Learning
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This proposal will test this hypothesis, using inactivation and single-unit recording to ask how OFC is involved learning and in the calculation of prediction errors in dopaminergic VTA neurons during Pavlovian blocking. ..
  15. Lasting Effects of Cocaine Use on Corticolimbic Funciton
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..In addition, changes in function related to other human neuropsychiatric diseases involving these areas could also be pursued using this model. ..
  16. Flexibility, prefrontal function, and changes with normal aging
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Improved performance may then be correlated with regional changes in neural activity, dendritic structure and innervation. ..
  17. Lasting Effects of Cocaine Use on Corticolimbic Funciton
    Geoffrey Schoenbaum; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..In addition, changes in function related to other human neuropsychiatric diseases involving these areas could also be pursued using this model. ..
  18. Flexibility, prefrontal function, and changes with normal aging
    GEOFFREY M SCHOENBAUM; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Improved performance may then be correlated with regional changes in neural activity, dendritic structure and innervation. ..