R A Schneider

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Developmental mechanisms facilitating the evolution of bills and quills
    Richard A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    J Anat 207:563-73. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Neural crest can form cartilages normally derived from mesoderm during development of the avian head skeleton
    R A Schneider
    Department of Zoology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 0325, USA
    Dev Biol 208:441-55. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint The cellular and molecular origins of beak morphology
    R A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 533 Parnassus Avenue, Suite U 453, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Science 299:565-8. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Cranial skeletal biology
    J A Helms
    University of California at San Francisco, Room U 453, 533 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143 0514, USA
    Nature 423:326-31. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Local retinoid signaling coordinates forebrain and facial morphogenesis by maintaining FGF8 and SHH
    R A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 533 Parnassus Avenue, Suite U-453, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0514, USA
    Development 128:2755-67. 2001
  6. pmc The cells that fill the bill: neural crest and the evolution of craniofacial development
    A H Jheon
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Avenue, U 453, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    J Dent Res 88:12-21. 2009
  7. pmc Amelogenins in human developing and mature dental pulp
    L Ye
    Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California at San Francisco, Box 0422, San Francisco, CA 94143 0422, USA
    J Dent Res 85:814-8. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Have gene knockouts caused evolutionary reversals in the mammalian first arch?
    K K Smith
    Department of Biological Anthropology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Bioessays 20:245-55. 1998
  9. pmc Structured three-dimensional co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells with chondrocytes promotes chondrogenic differentiation without hypertrophy
    M E Cooke
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 19:1210-8. 2011
  10. ncbi request reprint How to tweak a beak: molecular techniques for studying the evolution of size and shape in Darwin's finches and other birds
    Richard A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Avenue, U 453, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Bioessays 29:1-6. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Developmental mechanisms facilitating the evolution of bills and quills
    Richard A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    J Anat 207:563-73. 2005
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Neural crest can form cartilages normally derived from mesoderm during development of the avian head skeleton
    R A Schneider
    Department of Zoology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 0325, USA
    Dev Biol 208:441-55. 1999
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint The cellular and molecular origins of beak morphology
    R A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 533 Parnassus Avenue, Suite U 453, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Science 299:565-8. 2003
    ..Thus, neural crest cells are a source of molecular information that generates interspecific variation in beak morphology...
  4. ncbi request reprint Cranial skeletal biology
    J A Helms
    University of California at San Francisco, Room U 453, 533 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143 0514, USA
    Nature 423:326-31. 2003
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Local retinoid signaling coordinates forebrain and facial morphogenesis by maintaining FGF8 and SHH
    R A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 533 Parnassus Avenue, Suite U-453, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0514, USA
    Development 128:2755-67. 2001
    ..We propose that the local source of retinoic acid in the rostral head initiates a regulatory cascade that coordinates forebrain and frontonasal process morphogenesis...
  6. pmc The cells that fill the bill: neural crest and the evolution of craniofacial development
    A H Jheon
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Avenue, U 453, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    J Dent Res 88:12-21. 2009
    ..Here we review recent insights plucked from avians on key developmental processes that generate craniofacial diversity...
  7. pmc Amelogenins in human developing and mature dental pulp
    L Ye
    Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California at San Francisco, Box 0422, San Francisco, CA 94143 0422, USA
    J Dent Res 85:814-8. 2006
    ..These studies suggest that odontoblasts actively synthesize and secrete amelogenin protein during human tooth development, and that low-molecular-weight amelogenins can enhance pulp cell proliferation...
  8. ncbi request reprint Have gene knockouts caused evolutionary reversals in the mammalian first arch?
    K K Smith
    Department of Biological Anthropology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Bioessays 20:245-55. 1998
    ....
  9. pmc Structured three-dimensional co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells with chondrocytes promotes chondrogenic differentiation without hypertrophy
    M E Cooke
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 19:1210-8. 2011
    ..We hypothesized that a structured three-dimensional co-culture using hMSC and chondrocytes would provide chondroinductive cues to hMSC without inducing hypertrophy...
  10. ncbi request reprint How to tweak a beak: molecular techniques for studying the evolution of size and shape in Darwin's finches and other birds
    Richard A Schneider
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Avenue, U 453, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Bioessays 29:1-6. 2007
    ..The results are striking and point to a protein called calmodulin, which is a mediator of cellular calcium signaling, as a key determinant of beak length...
  11. pmc Mesenchyme-dependent BMP signaling directs the timing of mandibular osteogenesis
    Amy E Merrill
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Avenue, U 453, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Development 135:1223-34. 2008
    ..Our findings offer a developmental mechanism to explain how neural crest-derived mesenchyme and BMP signaling underlie the evolution of species-specific skeletal morphology...
  12. pmc Quail-duck chimeras reveal spatiotemporal plasticity in molecular and histogenic programs of cranial feather development
    B Frank Eames
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Avenue, U 453, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Development 132:1499-509. 2005
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Neural crest cells and the community of plan for craniofacial development: historical debates and current perspectives
    Drew M Noden
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 589:1-23. 2006
    ..In each case we frame these debates in the context of recent data on the developmental fate and roles of the neural crest...
  14. ncbi request reprint Bone remodeling during prenatal morphogenesis of the human mental foramen
    Ralf J Radlanski
    Charite, Campus Benjamin Franklin at Freie Universit├Ąt Berlin, Department of Experimental Dentistry, Berlin, Germany
    Eur J Oral Sci 112:301-10. 2004
    ..Bone was also resorbed in proximity to the dental primordia. In future studies, we will relate gene expression data to these morphological findings in order to identify molecular mechanisms that regulate this complex system...