L J Sanna

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Accessibility experiences and the hindsight bias: I knew it all along versus it could never have happened
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 3270, USA
    Mem Cognit 30:1288-96. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint The future is now: prospective temporal self-appraisals among defensive pessimists and optimists
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 3270, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 32:727-39. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Counterfactuals and motivation: mood as input to affective enjoyment and preparation
    L J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, USA
    Br J Soc Psychol 40:235-56. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint All our troubles seem so far away: temporal pattern to accessible alternatives and retrospective team appraisals
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 3270 Davie Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3270, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 30:1359-71. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Integrating temporal biases: the interplay of focal thoughts and accessibility experiences
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 3270, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:474-81. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint When debiasing backfires: accessible content and accessibility experiences in debiasing hindsight
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 3270, USA
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 28:497-502. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Defensive pessimism, optimism, and simulating alternatives: some ups and downs of prefactual and counterfactual thinking
    L J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman 99164 4820, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 71:1020-36. 1996
  8. ncbi request reprint Cultural variations in optimistic and pessimistic bias: do Easterners really expect the worst and Westerners really expect the best when predicting future life events?
    E C Chang
    Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 81:476-91. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Mood, self-esteem, and simulated alternatives: thought-provoking affective influences on counterfactual direction
    L J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman 99164 4820, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 76:543-58. 1999
  10. pmc Social cognition in schizophrenia: an overview
    David L Penn
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3270, USA
    Schizophr Bull 34:408-11. 2008

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. ncbi request reprint Accessibility experiences and the hindsight bias: I knew it all along versus it could never have happened
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 3270, USA
    Mem Cognit 30:1288-96. 2002
    ..Both effects are due to subjective accessibility experiences, and their role in influencing and debiasing the hindsight bias is discussed...
  2. ncbi request reprint The future is now: prospective temporal self-appraisals among defensive pessimists and optimists
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 3270, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 32:727-39. 2006
    ..Discussion centers on prospective self-appraisals and multiple strategies of defensive pessimists...
  3. ncbi request reprint Counterfactuals and motivation: mood as input to affective enjoyment and preparation
    L J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, USA
    Br J Soc Psychol 40:235-56. 2001
    ..Discussion centres on implications for counterfactuals, self-motives and mood-as-input research...
  4. ncbi request reprint All our troubles seem so far away: temporal pattern to accessible alternatives and retrospective team appraisals
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 3270 Davie Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3270, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 30:1359-71. 2004
    ..In Study 3, team performance on an investment task indicated it is whether alternatives are thought of easily, not thought content, that produces this effect. Discussion centers on temporal appraisals, other temporal biases, and teams...
  5. ncbi request reprint Integrating temporal biases: the interplay of focal thoughts and accessibility experiences
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 3270, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:474-81. 2004
    ..In no case was thought content alone sufficient to predict the biases. These results have implications for debiasing strategies and other judgments over time...
  6. ncbi request reprint When debiasing backfires: accessible content and accessibility experiences in debiasing hindsight
    Lawrence J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599 3270, USA
    J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 28:497-502. 2002
    ..The interplay of accessible content and subjective accessibility experiences in the hindsight bias is discussed...
  7. ncbi request reprint Defensive pessimism, optimism, and simulating alternatives: some ups and downs of prefactual and counterfactual thinking
    L J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman 99164 4820, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 71:1020-36. 1996
    ..Individual differences in strategies of prefactual and counterfactual thinking are discussed...
  8. ncbi request reprint Cultural variations in optimistic and pessimistic bias: do Easterners really expect the worst and Westerners really expect the best when predicting future life events?
    E C Chang
    Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 81:476-91. 2001
    ..In addition, Japanese expected positive events to be more likely to occur to others than to self (pessimistic bias). However, European Americans failed to show the expected optimistic bias for positive events...
  9. ncbi request reprint Mood, self-esteem, and simulated alternatives: thought-provoking affective influences on counterfactual direction
    L J Sanna
    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman 99164 4820, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 76:543-58. 1999
    ..HSE persons felt better after generating downward counterfactuals (Study 2) and took longer to agree to analogous statements (Studies 3 and 4) in bad moods, suggesting attempts at mood repair...
  10. pmc Social cognition in schizophrenia: an overview
    David L Penn
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3270, USA
    Schizophr Bull 34:408-11. 2008
    ..We conclude the column by discussing the relationship of social cognition to neurocognition, negative symptoms, and functioning, with an eye toward strategies for improving social cognition in schizophrenia...
  11. ncbi request reprint Retrospection in social dilemmas: how thinking about the past affects future cooperation
    Craig D Parks
    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman 99164, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 84:988-96. 2003
    ..The 2nd study also shows that the number and type of retrospective thoughts generated can be predicted from the person's social value orientation...
  12. ncbi request reprint Optimism, pessimism, and positive and negative affectivity in middle-aged adults: a test of a cognitive-affective model of psychological adjustment
    E C Chang
    Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA
    Psychol Aging 16:524-31. 2001
    ..These results add to the small but growing literature identifying optimism and pessimism as important concomitants of psychological adjustment in more mature adults...
  13. doi request reprint A preliminary look at loneliness as a moderator of the link between perfectionism and depressive and anxious symptoms in college students: does being lonely make perfectionistic strivings more distressing?
    Edward C Chang
    Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Behav Res Ther 46:877-86. 2008
    ..These findings are taken to offer support for a more contextual model of perfectionism. Some implications of the present findings are discussed...