Joan Sanders

Summary

Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint How do walking, standing, and resting influence transtibial amputee residual limb fluid volume?
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Box 355061, William H Foege Bldg, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98195
    J Rehabil Res Dev 51:201-12. 2014
  2. doi request reprint Influence of prior activity on residual limb volume and shape measured using plaster casting: results from individuals with transtibial limb loss
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, 355061, Foege N430J, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, Washington 98195
    J Rehabil Res Dev 50:1007-16. 2013
  3. ncbi request reprint How does adding and removing liquid from socket bladders affect residual-limb fluid volume?
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98195
    J Rehabil Res Dev 50:845-60. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Post-doffing residual limb fluid volume change in people with trans-tibial amputation
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, Box 355061, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 36:443-9. 2012
  5. ncbi request reprint Preliminary investigation of residual-limb fluid volume changes within one day
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, Foege N430J, 1705 Pacific St, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:1467-78. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Device to monitor sock use in people using prosthetic limbs: technical report
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, Box 355061, Foege N430J, 3720 15th Ave, NE, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 5061, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:1229-38. 2012
  7. ncbi request reprint How do sock ply changes affect residual-limb fluid volume in people with transtibial amputation?
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:241-56. 2012
  8. ncbi request reprint Computer-socket manufacturing error: how much before it is clinically apparent?
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:567-82. 2012
  9. doi request reprint Amputee socks: how does sock ply relate to sock thickness?
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, WA 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 36:77-86. 2012
  10. ncbi request reprint Changes in interface pressures and shear stresses over time on trans-tibial amputee subjects ambulating with prosthetic limbs: comparison of diurnal and six-month differences
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, Harris Hydraulics 309, University of Washington, Box 357962, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Biomech 38:1566-73. 2005

Research Grants

  1. Measuring In-Socket Residual Limb Volume Fluctuation
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2009
  2. Measuring In-Socket Residual Limb Volume Fluctuation
    Joan E Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2010
  3. Assessment of Tissue Response to Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2004
  4. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2004
  5. Skin Adaptation to Mechanical Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2004
  6. Assessment of Tissue Response to Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2005
  7. Skin Adaptation to Mechanical Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2005
  8. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2005
  9. Assessment of Tissue Response to Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2006
  10. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications61

  1. ncbi request reprint How do walking, standing, and resting influence transtibial amputee residual limb fluid volume?
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Box 355061, William H Foege Bldg, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98195
    J Rehabil Res Dev 51:201-12. 2014
    ..The differences in fluid volume response among subjects suggest that volume accommodation technologies should be matched to the activity-dependent fluid transport characteristics of the individual prosthesis user. ..
  2. doi request reprint Influence of prior activity on residual limb volume and shape measured using plaster casting: results from individuals with transtibial limb loss
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, 355061, Foege N430J, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, Washington 98195
    J Rehabil Res Dev 50:1007-16. 2013
    ..008). The result shows that prior activity influenced the residual limb cast shape. Practitioners should be mindful of prior activity and doffing history when casting an individual's limb for socket design and prosthetic fitting. ..
  3. ncbi request reprint How does adding and removing liquid from socket bladders affect residual-limb fluid volume?
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98195
    J Rehabil Res Dev 50:845-60. 2013
    ..Care should be taken when implementing adjustable socket technologies in people with limb loss. Reducing socket volume may accentuate residual-limb fluid volume loss. ..
  4. doi request reprint Post-doffing residual limb fluid volume change in people with trans-tibial amputation
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, Box 355061, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 36:443-9. 2012
    ..Residual limb volume may change after doffing, affecting the limb shape measured and used as a starting point for socket design...
  5. ncbi request reprint Preliminary investigation of residual-limb fluid volume changes within one day
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, Foege N430J, 1705 Pacific St, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:1467-78. 2012
    ..Rate of fluid volume change may be affected by sitting, standing, and walking activities; presence of peripheral arterial complications; being female; time since amputation; and wearing the socket without doffing for extended periods...
  6. ncbi request reprint Device to monitor sock use in people using prosthetic limbs: technical report
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, Box 355061, Foege N430J, 3720 15th Ave, NE, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 5061, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:1229-38. 2012
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint How do sock ply changes affect residual-limb fluid volume in people with transtibial amputation?
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:241-56. 2012
    ..Results are relevant for the anticipation of limb volume changes during prosthetic fitting and toward the design of adjustable-socket technologies...
  8. ncbi request reprint Computer-socket manufacturing error: how much before it is clinically apparent?
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 49:567-82. 2012
    ..MRE, IQR, and SNAE may serve as effective metrics to characterize quality of computer-manufactured prosthetic sockets, helping facilitate the development of quality standards for the socket manufacturing industry...
  9. doi request reprint Amputee socks: how does sock ply relate to sock thickness?
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, WA 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 36:77-86. 2012
    ..The term 'sock ply' may be a source of confusion in prosthetics practice because there may not be a consistent relationship between sock ply and sock thickness...
  10. ncbi request reprint Changes in interface pressures and shear stresses over time on trans-tibial amputee subjects ambulating with prosthetic limbs: comparison of diurnal and six-month differences
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, Harris Hydraulics 309, University of Washington, Box 357962, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Biomech 38:1566-73. 2005
    ..These results indicate that long-term changes are not simply accentuated diurnal fluctuations, suggesting that different treatment methods should be used to treat each condition...
  11. ncbi request reprint A noncontact sensor for measurement of distal residual-limb position during walking
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 43:509-16. 2006
    ..The device can potentially be used in prosthetics research for evaluating clinical features that may affect limb position and pistoning and thus fit...
  12. ncbi request reprint Clinical utility of in-socket residual limb volume change measurement: case study results
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 5061, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 33:378-90. 2009
    ..Presentation of bioimpedance data to patients improved compliance to practitioner recommendations and patient understanding. Results were useful towards clinical assessment, patient education, and decision-making about treatment...
  13. ncbi request reprint Small fiber diameter fibro-porous meshes: tissue response sensitivity to fiber spacing
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 72:335-42. 2005
    ..The results indicate that the reason for the lack of encapsulation of small-fiber fibro-porous meshes is not exclusively a pore boundary explanation, as is proposed for small-pore porous meshes...
  14. ncbi request reprint Testing of elastomeric liners used in limb prosthetics: classification of 15 products by mechanical performance
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 41:175-86. 2004
    ..The elastomeric liner material property data and response groupings provided here can potentially be useful to prosthetic fitting by providing quantitative information on similarities and differences among products...
  15. ncbi request reprint Fibro-porous meshes made from polyurethane micro-fibers: effects of surface charge on tissue response
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Bagley 461, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Biomaterials 26:813-8. 2005
    ..879). The results suggest that negatively charged surfaces may facilitate vessel ingrowth into fibro-porous mesh biomaterials...
  16. ncbi request reprint A digitizer with exceptional accuracy for use in prosthetics research: a technical note
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 40:191-5. 2003
    ..The system has potential use for time-dependent assessment of changes in socket and residuum cast shape, assessment of socket fabrication systems, and development of accurate prosthetic finite element models...
  17. ncbi request reprint Biomaterial mesh seeded with vascular remnants from a quail embryo has a significant and fast vascular templating effect on host implant tissue
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Tissue Eng 9:1271-9. 2003
    ..Tissue engineering of vessel templates may thus be a realistic solution to effective fast vascularization of biomaterials...
  18. ncbi request reprint Effects of fluid insert volume changes on socket pressures and shear stresses: case studies from two trans-tibial amputee subjects
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 30:257-69. 2006
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint CAD/CAM transtibial prosthetic sockets from central fabrication facilities: how accurate are they?
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 44:395-405. 2007
    ..Other companies showed inconsistent sizing or shape distortion, a difficult problem that represents a most challenging limitation for central fabrication facilities...
  20. ncbi request reprint Assessment of residual-limb volume change using bioimpedence
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 44:525-35. 2007
    ..Bioimpedance analysis may have use in prosthetics research, where comparing residual-limb volume at different time points or under different treatment conditions is of interest...
  21. doi request reprint A means to accommodate residual limb movement during optical scanning: a technical note
    Joan E Sanders
    Bioengineering Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 16:505-9. 2008
    ..The developed method is useful in prosthetics research where high resolution shape measurement is needed, for example in cases where residual limb shape or volume change is of interest...
  22. doi request reprint Central fabrication: carved positive assessment
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 35:81-9. 2011
    ..It is estimated that only 24% of practitioners use CAD/CAM regularly. Socket manufacturing error may be a source of the limited use of central fabrication...
  23. doi request reprint Measuring foam model shapes with a contact digitizer
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington, PO Box 355061, 3720 15th Ave NE Seattle, WA 98195 5, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 35:242-5. 2011
    ..The aim of this paper is to describe a technique to overcome this challenge and to assess its effect on digitizer error...
  24. ncbi request reprint Assessment technique for computer-aided manufactured sockets
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 48:763-74. 2011
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Residual limb volume change: systematic review of measurement and management
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, Box 355061, Foege N430J, 3720 15th Ave NE, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 5061, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 48:949-86. 2011
    ..While we can draw some insights from the available research about residual limb volume measurement and management, further research is required...
  26. ncbi request reprint Effects of elevated vacuum on in-socket residual limb fluid volume: case study results using bioimpedance analysis
    Joan E Sanders
    University of Washington Bioengineering, 3720 15th Ave NE, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 48:1231-48. 2011
    ..Researchers should well consider these variables in the study design of future investigations on the effects of elevated vacuum on residual limb volume...
  27. ncbi request reprint Tissue response to single-polymer fibers of varying diameters: evaluation of fibrous encapsulation and macrophage density
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res 52:231-7. 2000
    ..A next step will be to extend the analysis to meshes to evaluate fiber-spacing effects on small-fiber biomaterials...
  28. ncbi request reprint Polymer microfiber mechanical properties: a system for assessment and investigation of the link with fibrous capsule formation
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, 357962, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 67:1412-6. 2003
    ..It is suggested that the results reflect the greater attachment and mechanical interaction of cells with microfibers for the 6.0-10.9 microm-diameter range than for the 1.0-5.9 microm-diameter range...
  29. ncbi request reprint Fibrous encapsulation of single polymer microfibers depends on their vertical dimension in subcutaneous tissue
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, 357962, Harris 309, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 67:1181-7. 2003
    ..9 microm, separation of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix creates dead space regions adjacent to the fibers that attract inflammatory cells and stimulate fibrous capsule formation...
  30. ncbi request reprint Prevascularization of a biomaterial using a chorioallontoic membrane
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Microvasc Res 64:174-8. 2002
  31. ncbi request reprint Collagen fibril diameters increase and fibril densities decrease in skin subjected to repetitive compressive and shear stresses
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, 357962, Harris Hydraulics 309, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Biomech 34:1581-7. 2001
    ..These results demonstrate that quantifiable changes occur in collagen fibril architecture but not in the gross tissue morphology following in vivo cyclic loading of pig skin...
  32. ncbi request reprint Control of in vivo microvessel ingrowth by modulation of biomaterial local architecture and chemistry
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res 60:36-43. 2002
    ..120 and p = 0.289 for the vessel surface area and number of vessels, respectively). The developed methods have potential applications in biomaterial design applications for which selective neovascularization is desired...
  33. ncbi request reprint Mechanical performance of inflatable inserts used in limb prosthetics
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 38:365-74. 2001
    ..An insert that allowed adjustment of the location of the Phase I to Phase II transition point in the pressure versus thickness curve might help to overcome these limitations...
  34. ncbi request reprint Thermal response of skin to cyclic pressure and pressure with shear: a technical note
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 37:511-5. 2000
    ..The thermal response assessment method could then potentially be used to quantitatively evaluate the effects of different interface design features in lower-limb prosthetics on tissue response...
  35. ncbi request reprint Changes in interface pressure and stump shape over time: preliminary results from a trans-tibial amputee subject
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 24:163-8. 2000
    ..Identification of localised areas of swelling and atrophy and understanding of their effects on interface pressures could be used to improve individual socket design...
  36. ncbi request reprint Effects of changes in cadence, prosthetic componentry, and time on interface pressures and shear stresses of three trans-tibial amputees
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Box 357962, Harris 309, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 15:684-94. 2000
    ..To evaluate the effects of changes in cadence, prosthetic componentry, and time on interface pressures and resultant shear stresses in trans-tibial amputee case studies...
  37. ncbi request reprint Image processing techniques for quantitative analysis of skin structures
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Comput Methods Programs Biomed 59:167-80. 1999
    ..The computer method took longer to conduct than the traditional method, though with recent advances in computer hardware this time difference would be eliminated...
  38. ncbi request reprint Tissue response to microfibers of different polymers: polyester, polyethylene, polylactic acid, and polyurethane
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington Engineered Biomaterials UWEB Program, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res 62:222-7. 2002
    ..PU showed the least encapsulation of all polymers, demonstrating significantly thinner capsules than PET, PE, and PLA for 6-10 and 11-15 microm fibers...
  39. ncbi request reprint Interface pressure and shear stress changes with amputee weight loss: case studies from two trans-tibial amputee subjects
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 26:243-50. 2002
    ..Adding socks at the end of the study did not return interface pressures to first session values at all sites. It is expected that local stump shape changes occurred, causing a non-uniform change in interface stress patterns...
  40. ncbi request reprint Relative influence of polymer fiber diameter and surface charge on fibrous capsule thickness and vessel density for single-fiber implants
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, 357962, University of Washington, Seattle Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 65:462-7. 2003
    ..This ranking of the relative influence of design features in relation to tissue response provides useful information for prioritization in biomaterial design...
  41. ncbi request reprint An explant model for the investigation of skin adaptation to mechanical stress
    Joan E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, 357962, Harris 309, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 49:1626-31. 2002
    ..The system allows insight into the mechanisms of skin adaptation to mechanical stress to be investigated on a cellular and molecular level, potentially leading to therapies to encourage adaptation in at-risk patients...
  42. ncbi request reprint Standing interface stresses as a predictor of walking interface stresses in the trans-tibial prosthesis
    S G Zachariah
    Departments of Bioengineering and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 25:34-40. 2001
    ....
  43. ncbi request reprint A device to apply user-specified strains to biomaterials in culture
    S B Mitchell
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 48:268-73. 2001
    ..The long-term intent is to establish mechanical loading configurations that induce acceptable or adaptation-inducing responses for use in implant design and tissue engineering applications...
  44. ncbi request reprint Material properties of commonly-used interface materials and their static coefficients of friction with skin and socks
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 35:161-76. 1998
    ....
  45. ncbi request reprint Mechanical characterization of biomaterials
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 831:232-43. 1997
    ..Experimental testing, computational modeling, and tissue response to stress and strain are discussed in the context of enhancing biomaterial design...
  46. ncbi request reprint A bidirectional load applicator for the investigation of skin response to mechanical stress
    J E Sanders
    Center for Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 44:290-6. 1997
    ..The instrument is to be used for the investigation of skin adaptation to mechanical stress, information that could be used to design new therapeutic methods to encourage skin load-tolerance...
  47. ncbi request reprint How does skin adapt to repetitive mechanical stress to become load tolerant?
    Y N Wang
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Med Hypotheses 61:29-35. 2003
    ..After remodeling, total collagen fibril cross-sectional area is expected to return to baseline values since increased collagen content would increase mass and be redundant towards the purpose of adaptation...
  48. ncbi request reprint A modular six-directional force sensor for prosthetic assessment: a technical note
    J E Sanders
    Center for Bioengineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 34:195-202. 1997
    ..2% of the full-scale output for each direction. Data collected on a subject with TTA walking at different speeds are presented...
  49. ncbi request reprint Interface pressures and shear stresses: sagittal plane angular alignment effects in three trans-tibial amputee case studies
    J E Sanders
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Prosthet Orthot Int 23:21-9. 1999
    ..Changes in interface stresses from session to session tended to be greater than those for different alignment settings, suggesting that subjects compensated well for misalignments but less well for session differences...
  50. ncbi request reprint A unique device for controlled electrospinning
    S B Mitchell
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 78:110-20. 2006
    ..8% were made; inter-fiber spacing ranged from 4 to 90 microm with variability less than 20.2%. The system has potential use in biomedical applications where meshes with controlled fiber diameter and inter-fiber spacing are of interest...
  51. ncbi request reprint Interface pressures and shear stresses at thirteen socket sites on two persons with transtibial amputation
    J E Sanders
    Center for Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 34:19-43. 1997
    ..Significant difference (p < 0.05) in maximal stresses between sessions conducted > 3 weeks apart were apparent for both subjects...
  52. ncbi request reprint Matricellular hevin regulates decorin production and collagen assembly
    Millicent M Sullivan
    Hope Heart Program, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA
    J Biol Chem 281:27621-32. 2006
    ..Our observations support the capacity of hevin to modulate the structure of dermal extracellular matrix, specifically by its regulation of decorin levels and collagen fibril assembly...
  53. ncbi request reprint Use of vascular explants for ex vivo neovascularization of biomaterials
    M Iurlaro
    Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Microvasc Res 64:398-404. 2002
    ..This study shows that artificial biomaterial meshes can be colonized ex vivo with histotypic microvascular networks, and provides the proof of concept for the future development of stably vascularized devices for in vivo implantation...
  54. ncbi request reprint Administration of cyclosporine for 24 months compared with 6 months for prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease: a prospective randomized clinical trial
    E Kansu
    Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA
    Blood 98:3868-70. 2001
    ..76; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-1.21; P =.25). In addition, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in transplantation-related mortality, survival, or disease-free survival...
  55. ncbi request reprint Tissue engineering of perfused microvessels
    Thomas Neumann
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Box 357962, Seattle, WA 98195 7962, USA
    Microvasc Res 66:59-67. 2003
    ..The vessels were continuously perfused with culture medium over 7 days without failure. Artificial microvessels may prove useful in tissue engineering and as models for vascular research...
  56. ncbi request reprint Tissue engineering of skeletal muscle using polymer fiber arrays
    Thomas Neumann
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 7962, USA
    Tissue Eng 9:995-1003. 2003
    ..Larger, three-dimensional structures might be created by arranging fibers in several layers or by stacking cellular sheets...
  57. ncbi request reprint Processing computer tomography bone data for prosthetic finite element modeling: a technical note
    Rakesh Saxena
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 39:609-14. 2002
    ..Effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on image data from a unilateral transtibial amputee subject...
  58. ncbi request reprint Energy storage and return prostheses: does patient perception correlate with biomechanical analysis?
    Brian J Hafner
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Harris Hydraulics 309, Box 357962, Seattle 98195, USA
    Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 17:325-44. 2002
    ....
  59. ncbi request reprint A method for aligning trans-tibial residual limb shapes so as to identify regions of shape change
    Santosh G Zachariah
    Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA 98052, USA
    IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 13:551-7. 2005
    ..357 degrees for each of the three rotation directions. This algorithm could be helpful to patients, prosthetists, and researchers developing treatments to overcome the detrimental fitting effects of residual limb shape change...
  60. ncbi request reprint Transtibial energy-storage-and-return prosthetic devices: a review of energy concepts and a proposed nomenclature
    Brian J Hafner
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 39:1-11. 2002
    ..This review and proposed classification scheme should help to alleviate confusion and should facilitate enhancement of the design, selection, and fitting of prosthetic limbs for amputee patients...
  61. ncbi request reprint Shape and volume change in the transtibial residuum over the short term: preliminary investigation of six subjects
    Santosh G Zachariah
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Rehabil Res Dev 41:683-94. 2004
    ..Multiple mechanisms of fluid movement may be responsible for short-term volume changes, with different relative magnitudes and rates in different amputees...

Research Grants28

  1. Measuring In-Socket Residual Limb Volume Fluctuation
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  2. Measuring In-Socket Residual Limb Volume Fluctuation
    Joan E Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Thisinstrumentcouldbeextendedtowardstheimplementationand evaluationofnovelvolumecontrolstrategiesandalsoappliedtootherareasof rehabilitationwheremanagementofinterstitialfluidcontrolisclinicallyrelevant. ..
  3. Assessment of Tissue Response to Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..If effective, potentially this technology could be applied to other areas of rehabilitation, for example, shoe design for patients with insensate feet, cushion design for wheelchair users, and mattress design for bedridden patients ..
  4. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The development of methods to predict and overcome the detrimental effects of residual limb shape change and ultimately prevent soft-tissue breakdown will help to prevent secondary disability and morbidity in the amputee population. ..
  5. Skin Adaptation to Mechanical Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..By understanding the process of skin adaptation (natural skin strengthening) at both a cellular and molecular level, therapies to encourage skin adaptation before breakdown occurs can be intelligently pursued. ..
  6. Assessment of Tissue Response to Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..If effective, potentially this technology could be applied to other areas of rehabilitation, for example, shoe design for patients with insensate feet, cushion design for wheelchair users, and mattress design for bedridden patients ..
  7. Skin Adaptation to Mechanical Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..By understanding the process of skin adaptation (natural skin strengthening) at both a cellular and molecular level, therapies to encourage skin adaptation before breakdown occurs can be intelligently pursued. ..
  8. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..The development of methods to predict and overcome the detrimental effects of residual limb shape change and ultimately prevent soft-tissue breakdown will help to prevent secondary disability and morbidity in the amputee population. ..
  9. Assessment of Tissue Response to Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..If effective, potentially this technology could be applied to other areas of rehabilitation, for example, shoe design for patients with insensate feet, cushion design for wheelchair users, and mattress design for bedridden patients ..
  10. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The development of methods to predict and overcome the detrimental effects of residual limb shape change and ultimately prevent soft-tissue breakdown will help to prevent secondary disability and morbidity in the amputee population. ..
  11. Skin Adaptation to Mechanical Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..By understanding the process of skin adaptation (natural skin strengthening) at both a cellular and molecular level, therapies to encourage skin adaptation before breakdown occurs can be intelligently pursued. ..
  12. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The development of methods to predict and overcome the detrimental effects of residual limb shape change and ultimately prevent soft-tissue breakdown will help to prevent secondary disability and morbidity in the amputee population. ..
  13. Skin Adaptation to Mechanical Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..By understanding the process of skin adaptation (natural skin strengthening) at both a cellular and molecular level, therapies to encourage skin adaptation before breakdown occurs can be intelligently pursued. ..
  14. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS, AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  15. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS, AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ....
  16. NEW BIOMATERIALS TO MINIMIZE SCAR TISSUE FORMATION
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..e. soft-tissue complications that require surgical repair through use of a biomaterial. The new materials will prevent scar tissue formation and reduce the occurrence of secondary complications. ..
  17. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS, AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ....
  18. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS, AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ....
  19. NEW BIOMATERIALS TO MINIMIZE SCAR TISSUE FORMATION
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..e. soft-tissue complications that require surgical repair through use of a biomaterial. The new materials will prevent scar tissue formation and reduce the occurrence of secondary complications. ..
  20. INTERFACE MECHANICS, MATERIALS, AND TISSUE RESPONSE
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ....
  21. NEW BIOMATERIALS TO MINIMIZE SCAR TISSUE FORMATION
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..e. soft-tissue complications that require surgical repair through use of a biomaterial. The new materials will prevent scar tissue formation and reduce the occurrence of secondary complications. ..
  22. Assessment of Tissue Response to Stress
    Joan Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..If effective, potentially this technology could be applied to other areas of rehabilitation, for example, shoe design for patients with insensate feet, cushion design for wheelchair users, and mattress design for bedridden patients ..
  23. Interface Materials for Patients with Limb Amputation
    Joan E Sanders; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....