Kathryn A Roecklein

Summary

Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Melanopsin, photosensitive ganglion cells, and seasonal affective disorder
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 3500 Sennott Square, 210 South Bouquet St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 37:229-39. 2013
  2. pmc Melanopsin gene variations interact with season to predict sleep onset and chronotype
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
    Chronobiol Int 29:1036-47. 2012
  3. pmc Cognitive and behavioral predictors of light therapy use
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e39275. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Personalized feedback to improve CPAP adherence in obstructive sleep apnea
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 210 South Bouquet St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
    Behav Sleep Med 8:105-12. 2010
  5. pmc The role of beliefs and attitudes about sleep in seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorder, and nondepressed controls
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychology, 210 South Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, United States
    J Affect Disord 150:466-73. 2013
  6. doi request reprint Cognitive vulnerability in moderate, mild, and low seasonality
    Kelly J Rohan
    Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, John Dewey Hall, 2 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405 0134, USA
    J Nerv Ment Dis 199:961-70. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Winter depression recurrence one year after cognitive-behavioral therapy, light therapy, or combination treatment
    Kelly J Rohan
    Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, John Dewey Hall, 2 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405 0134, USA
    Behav Ther 40:225-38. 2009
  8. pmc Prevalence and correlates of binge eating in seasonal affective disorder
    Shannon D Donofry
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Psychiatry Res 217:47-53. 2014
  9. ncbi request reprint A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy, light therapy, and their combination for seasonal affective disorder
    Kelly J Rohan
    Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 0134, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 75:489-500. 2007

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Melanopsin, photosensitive ganglion cells, and seasonal affective disorder
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 3500 Sennott Square, 210 South Bouquet St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 37:229-39. 2013
    ..Here we outline steps for new research to address the possible role of melanopsin in seasonal affective disorder including chromatic pupillometry designed to measure the sensitivity of melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells...
  2. pmc Melanopsin gene variations interact with season to predict sleep onset and chronotype
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
    Chronobiol Int 29:1036-47. 2012
    ..e., circadian, sleep, mood) as well as the etiology of disorders with seasonal patterns of recurrence or exacerbation...
  3. pmc Cognitive and behavioral predictors of light therapy use
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e39275. 2012
    ..Perhaps more importantly, only 12-41% of individuals with SAD continue to use the treatment even after a previous winter of successful treatment...
  4. doi request reprint Personalized feedback to improve CPAP adherence in obstructive sleep apnea
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 210 South Bouquet St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
    Behav Sleep Med 8:105-12. 2010
    ..Explanations for the findings include low power, that machines were not provided, and an atypical sample. Effect sizes were medium to large at 2 weeks, suggesting that sufficiently powered studies may be warranted...
  5. pmc The role of beliefs and attitudes about sleep in seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorder, and nondepressed controls
    Kathryn A Roecklein
    University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychology, 210 South Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, United States
    J Affect Disord 150:466-73. 2013
    ....
  6. doi request reprint Cognitive vulnerability in moderate, mild, and low seasonality
    Kelly J Rohan
    Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, John Dewey Hall, 2 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405 0134, USA
    J Nerv Ment Dis 199:961-70. 2011
    ..The findings support a possible cognitive mechanism of winter depression onset and/or maintenance unique to individuals with moderate, as opposed to mild, seasonality...
  7. ncbi request reprint Winter depression recurrence one year after cognitive-behavioral therapy, light therapy, or combination treatment
    Kelly J Rohan
    Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, John Dewey Hall, 2 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405 0134, USA
    Behav Ther 40:225-38. 2009
    ..If these findings are replicated, CBT could represent a more effective, practical, and palatable approach to long-term SAD management than light therapy...
  8. pmc Prevalence and correlates of binge eating in seasonal affective disorder
    Shannon D Donofry
    Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Psychiatry Res 217:47-53. 2014
    ..The spectrum of eating pathology in SAD includes symptoms of BED, which are associated with atypical depression symptoms, but typical depression symptoms. ..
  9. ncbi request reprint A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy, light therapy, and their combination for seasonal affective disorder
    Kelly J Rohan
    Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 0134, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 75:489-500. 2007
    ..If replicated, CBT + LT's remission rate would represent a clinically meaningful improvement over the 53% observed across LT studies...