Shannen L Robson

Summary

Affiliation: University of Utah
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Hominin life history: reconstruction and evolution
    Shannen L Robson
    Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Anat 212:394-425. 2008
  2. pmc Twinning in humans: maternal heterogeneity in reproduction and survival
    Shannen L Robson
    Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 278:3755-61. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Mortality and fertility rates in humans and chimpanzees: How within-species variation complicates cross-species comparisons
    Kristen Hawkes
    Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 84112 0600, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 21:578-86. 2009

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. pmc Hominin life history: reconstruction and evolution
    Shannen L Robson
    Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    J Anat 212:394-425. 2008
    ..At least one extinct hominin subclade, Paranthropus, has a pattern of dental life history-related variables that most likely set it apart from the life histories of both modern humans and chimpanzees...
  2. pmc Twinning in humans: maternal heterogeneity in reproduction and survival
    Shannen L Robson
    Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 278:3755-61. 2011
    ..From the largest historical sample of twinning mothers yet published, we conclude that bearing twins is more likely for those with a robust phenotype and is a useful index of maternal heterogeneity...
  3. doi request reprint Mortality and fertility rates in humans and chimpanzees: How within-species variation complicates cross-species comparisons
    Kristen Hawkes
    Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 84112 0600, USA
    Am J Hum Biol 21:578-86. 2009
    ..We report these puzzles using data from nine human populations and both wild and captive chimpanzees, and suggest that systematic differences in the heterogeneity of surviving adults may explain them...