Joel Richter

Summary

Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Medical School
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Regulation of cap-dependent translation by eIF4E inhibitory proteins
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nature 433:477-80. 2005
  2. pmc Cytoplasmic polyadenylation and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-dependent mRNA regulation are involved in Xenopus retinal axon development
    Andrew C Lin
    Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3DY, UK
    Neural Dev 4:8. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint Development. The message is in the translation
    J D Richter
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Science 293:60-2. 2001
  4. pmc Think globally, translate locally: what mitotic spindles and neuronal synapses have in common
    J D Richter
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Biotech 4, Room 330, 377 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:7069-71. 2001
  5. ncbi request reprint Selective translation of mRNAs at synapses
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 12:300-4. 2002
  6. doi request reprint Making synaptic plasticity and memory last: mechanisms of translational regulation
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 23:1-11. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint CPEB: a life in translation
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Trends Biochem Sci 32:279-85. 2007
  8. pmc Translational control in oocyte development
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01606, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 3:a002758. 2011
  9. doi request reprint Translational control of synaptic plasticity
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Biochem Soc Trans 38:1527-30. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint CPEB, maskin, and cyclin B1 mRNA at the mitotic apparatus: implications for local translational control of cell division
    I Groisman
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655, USA
    Cell 103:435-47. 2000

Research Grants

  1. CPEB and Cell Senescence
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
  2. TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL IN EARLY MAMMALIAN DEVELOPMENT
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. RNA Localization 2006
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
  4. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2009
  5. CPEB and Cell Senescence
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2009
  6. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2009
  7. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel D Richter; Fiscal Year: 2010
  8. CELL BIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
  9. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
  10. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 1999

Collaborators

  • John Carson
  • Nahum Sonenberg
  • Eric Klann
  • Paul Lasko
  • W E Theurkauf
  • Dagan Wells
  • Li Wu
  • Kenneth Ryan
  • Juan M Alarcon
  • Roger Davis
  • E R Kandel
  • Martin Theis
  • Yi Shuian Huang
  • Quiping Cao
  • R Mendez
  • Jong Heon Kim
  • Madathia Sarkissian
  • Daron C Barnard
  • Mi Young Jung
  • Irina Groisman
  • N Ruth Zearfoss
  • Kiran Padmanabhan
  • Rachel Groppo
  • Raul Mendez
  • Andrew C Lin
  • Chien Ling Lin
  • Jeffrey J Tung
  • J Tay
  • Joanne Berger-Sweeney
  • Stephanie Nottrott
  • Waldemar J Racki
  • C H de Moor
  • Ming Chung Kan
  • Ling Du
  • Joyce Tay
  • R Hodgman
  • I Groisman
  • Laure Strochlic
  • Q Cao
  • Christine E Holt
  • Chin Lik Tan
  • B Stebbins-Boaz
  • Pierre Trifilieff
  • Peter K Jackson
  • David V Hansen
  • Norman J Kennedy
  • Martin J Simard
  • Veronica Marin
  • Maria Ivshina
  • Lori Lorenz
  • James L Manley
  • Rebecca Hodgman
  • Elisa Barbarese
  • Daron Barnard
  • Y S Huang
  • L E Hake
  • T Andresson
  • K G Murthy
  • J V Ruderman
  • L E Littlepage
  • J L Manley

Detail Information

Publications49

  1. ncbi request reprint Regulation of cap-dependent translation by eIF4E inhibitory proteins
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nature 433:477-80. 2005
    ..The biological importance of this translational regulation is immense, and affects such processes as cell growth, development, oncogenic transformation and perhaps even axon pathfinding and memory consolidation...
  2. pmc Cytoplasmic polyadenylation and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-dependent mRNA regulation are involved in Xenopus retinal axon development
    Andrew C Lin
    Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3DY, UK
    Neural Dev 4:8. 2009
    ..Control of poly(A) tail length by cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE) binding protein 1 (CPEB1) is a conserved mechanism for mRNA-specific translational regulation that could be involved in regulating translation in axons...
  3. ncbi request reprint Development. The message is in the translation
    J D Richter
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Science 293:60-2. 2001
  4. pmc Think globally, translate locally: what mitotic spindles and neuronal synapses have in common
    J D Richter
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Biotech 4, Room 330, 377 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:7069-71. 2001
    ..Therefore, CPEB-controlled local translation may influence such seemingly disparate processes as the cell cycle and synaptic plasticity...
  5. ncbi request reprint Selective translation of mRNAs at synapses
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 12:300-4. 2002
    ..Such mechanisms may be inferred from those operating in early development and in cognitive disease...
  6. doi request reprint Making synaptic plasticity and memory last: mechanisms of translational regulation
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 23:1-11. 2009
    ..Here, we review recent studies that reflect the importance and challenges of investigating the role of mRNA translation in synaptic plasticity and memory formation...
  7. ncbi request reprint CPEB: a life in translation
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Trends Biochem Sci 32:279-85. 2007
    ..These observations underscore the growing complexities of CPEB involvement in cell function...
  8. pmc Translational control in oocyte development
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01606, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 3:a002758. 2011
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Translational control of synaptic plasticity
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Biochem Soc Trans 38:1527-30. 2010
    ..In the present paper, I review some salient features of translational control of synaptic plasticity...
  10. ncbi request reprint CPEB, maskin, and cyclin B1 mRNA at the mitotic apparatus: implications for local translational control of cell division
    I Groisman
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655, USA
    Cell 103:435-47. 2000
    ..These data suggest that CPEB-regulated mRNA translation is important for the integrity of the mitotic apparatus and for cell division...
  11. ncbi request reprint Translational control by CPEB: a means to the end
    R Mendez
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2:521-9. 2001
    ..What are the features and functions of this multifaceted protein?..
  12. ncbi request reprint CPEB-mediated cytoplasmic polyadenylation and the regulation of experience-dependent translation of alpha-CaMKII mRNA at synapses
    L Wu
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655, USA
    Neuron 21:1129-39. 1998
    ..In the intact brain, visual experience induces alpha-CaMKII mRNA polyadenylation and translation, suggesting that this process likely occurs at synapses...
  13. ncbi request reprint Phosphorylation of CPEB by Eg2 mediates the recruitment of CPSF into an active cytoplasmic polyadenylation complex
    R Mendez
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655, USA
    Mol Cell 6:1253-9. 2000
    ..These results demonstrate that the molecular function of Eg2-phosphorylated CPEB is to recruit CPSF into an active cytoplasmic polyadenylation complex...
  14. ncbi request reprint Phosphorylation of CPE binding factor by Eg2 regulates translation of c-mos mRNA
    R Mendez
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester 01655, USA
    Nature 404:302-7. 2000
    ..In addition, we show that this selective, early phosphorylation of CPEB is catalysed by Eg2, a member of the Aurora family of serine/threonine protein kinases...
  15. ncbi request reprint Translational control in vertebrate development
    C H de Moor
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655, USA
    Int Rev Cytol 203:567-608. 2001
    ..This review discusses examples of translational control and their relevance for developmental regulation...
  16. ncbi request reprint Maskin is a CPEB-associated factor that transiently interacts with elF-4E
    B Stebbins-Boaz
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655, USA
    Mol Cell 4:1017-27. 1999
    ..The dissolution of this complex may result in the binding of elF-4E to elF-4G and the translational activation of CPE-containing mRNAs...
  17. ncbi request reprint Germ cell differentiation and synaptonemal complex formation are disrupted in CPEB knockout mice
    J Tay
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655, USA
    Dev Cell 1:201-13. 2001
    ..Synaptonemal complexes were not detected in these animals. CPEB therefore controls germ cell differentiation by regulating the formation of the synaptonemal complex...
  18. ncbi request reprint CPEB phosphorylation and cytoplasmic polyadenylation are catalyzed by the kinase IAK1/Eg2 in maturing mouse oocytes
    R Hodgman
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Development 128:2815-22. 2001
    ..These data indicate that cytoplasmic polyadenylation in mouse oocytes is mediated by IAK1/Eg2-catalyzed phosphorylation of CPEB...
  19. pmc CPEB control of NF-kappaB nuclear localization and interleukin-6 production mediates cellular senescence
    Rachel Groppo
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 31:2707-14. 2011
    ..Thus, CPEB deficiency not only increases IL-6 production but also renders the cell incapable of a senescence-promoting response...
  20. pmc Cytoplasmic polyadenylation in development and beyond
    J D Richter
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, USA
    Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 63:446-56. 1999
    ..Finally, there may be multiple mechanisms by which polyadenylation promotes translation. Important questions yet to be answered in the field of cytoplasmic polyadenylation are addressed...
  21. ncbi request reprint Opposing polymerase-deadenylase activities regulate cytoplasmic polyadenylation
    Jong Heon Kim
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Mol Cell 24:173-83. 2006
    ..However, because PARN is more active than Gld2, the poly(A) tail is short. When oocytes mature, CPEB phosphorylation causes PARN to be expelled from the ribonucleoprotein complex, which allows Gld2 to elongate poly(A) by default...
  22. ncbi request reprint CDK1 and calcineurin regulate Maskin association with eIF4E and translational control of cell cycle progression
    Quiping Cao
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 373 Plantation St, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 13:1128-34. 2006
    ..These phosphorylation events control the Maskin-eIF4E interaction and, as a result, translation of cyclin B1 mRNA. Cell cycle progression requires this Maskin-mediated translational regulation...
  23. pmc CPEB3 and CPEB4 in neurons: analysis of RNA-binding specificity and translational control of AMPA receptor GluR2 mRNA
    Yi Shuian Huang
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    EMBO J 25:4865-76. 2006
    ..These results indicate that CPEB3 is a sequence-specific translational regulatory protein...
  24. ncbi request reprint Analysis of mRNA translation in cultured hippocampal neurons
    Yi Shuian Huang
    Division of Neuroscience, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
    Methods Enzymol 431:143-62. 2007
    ..2006); here, we describe the experimental details of our methods, which could be used for any RNA binding protein...
  25. pmc RINGO/cdk1 and CPEB mediate poly(A) tail stabilization and translational regulation by ePAB
    Jong Heon Kim
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 21:2571-9. 2007
    ..Subsequent ePAB binding to the poly(A) tail is necessary to protect the homopolymer from degradation by deadenylating enzymes. Poly(A)-bound ePAB also interacts with eIF4G, which instigates translation initiation of CPEB-bound mRNAs...
  26. doi request reprint Breaking the code of polyadenylation-induced translation
    Joel D Richter
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 373 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Cell 132:335-7. 2008
    ..In this issue, Piqué et al. (2008) explore the interplay of these elements to elucidate a combinatorial code that predicts the timing of polyadenylation and translation of maternal mRNAs...
  27. ncbi request reprint Translational unmasking of Emi2 directs cytostatic factor arrest in meiosis II
    Jeffrey J Tung
    Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, California, USA
    Cell Cycle 6:725-31. 2007
    ..Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational unmasking of Emi2 directs meiosis II-specific CSF arrest...
  28. doi request reprint A molecular circuit composed of CPEB-1 and c-Jun controls growth hormone-mediated synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus
    N Ruth Zearfoss
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Neurosci 28:8502-9. 2008
    ..These results indicate that CPEB-1 control of c-Jun mRNA translation regulates GH gene expression and resulting downstream signaling events (e.g., synaptic plasticity) in the mouse hippocampus...
  29. pmc Control of cellular senescence by CPEB
    Irina Groisman
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 20:2701-12. 2006
    ..Thus, CPEB appears to act as a translational repressor protein to control myc translation and resulting cellular senescence...
  30. pmc Translational control by neuroguidin, a eukaryotic initiation factor 4E and CPEB binding protein
    Mi Young Jung
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Suite 204, 373 Plantation St, Worcester MA 01605, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 26:4277-87. 2006
    ..These data suggest that Ngd guides neural development by regulating the translation of CPE-containing mRNAs...
  31. ncbi request reprint Reduced extinction of hippocampal-dependent memories in CPEB knockout mice
    Joanne Berger-Sweeney
    Department of Biology, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02481, USA
    Learn Mem 13:4-7. 2006
    ..14% of hippocampal genes have an altered expression in the CPEB knockout mouse. These data suggest that CPEB-dependent local protein synthesis may be an important cellular mechanism underlying extinction of hippocampal-dependent memories...
  32. pmc Differential mRNA translation and meiotic progression require Cdc2-mediated CPEB destruction
    Raul Mendez
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    EMBO J 21:1833-44. 2002
    ..CPEB destruction is also necessary for mitosis in the early embryo. These data indicate that a change in the CPEB:CPE ratio is necessary to activate mRNAs at metaphase I and drive the cells' entry into metaphase II...
  33. pmc N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling results in Aurora kinase-catalyzed CPEB phosphorylation and alpha CaMKII mRNA polyadenylation at synapses
    Yi Shuian Huang
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    EMBO J 21:2139-48. 2002
    ..These data demonstrate a remarkable conservation of the regulatory machinery that controls signal-induced mRNA translation, and elucidates an axis connecting the NMDA receptor to localized protein synthesis at synapses...
  34. ncbi request reprint Translational control of the embryonic cell cycle
    Irina Groisman
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01605, USA
    Cell 109:473-83. 2002
    ..Mammalian cells also display a cell cycle-dependent cytoplasmic polyadenylation, suggesting that translational control by polyadenylation might be a general feature of mitosis in animal cells...
  35. pmc Dissolution of the maskin-eIF4E complex by cytoplasmic polyadenylation and poly(A)-binding protein controls cyclin B1 mRNA translation and oocyte maturation
    Quiping Cao
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    EMBO J 21:3852-62. 2002
    ..These results suggest a molecular mechanism by which CPE- containing mRNA is activated in early development...
  36. pmc Regulated CPEB phosphorylation during meiotic progression suggests a mechanism for temporal control of maternal mRNA translation
    Joyce Tay
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 17:1457-62. 2003
    ..The temporal control of CPEB phosphorylation suggests a mechanism in which CPE-containing mRNA translation is stimulated at pachytene and metaphase I...
  37. pmc Progesterone and insulin stimulation of CPEB-dependent polyadenylation is regulated by Aurora A and glycogen synthase kinase-3
    Madathia Sarkissian
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 18:48-61. 2004
    ..These results suggest that the progesterone and insulin stimulate maturation by inhibiting GSK-3, which allows Aurora A activation and CPEB-mediated translation...
  38. ncbi request reprint Regulation of local mRNA translation
    Yi Shuian Huang
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 373 Plantation Street, Suite 204, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 16:308-13. 2004
    ..The importance of local translation cannot be overstated, for, depending on the species or cell type, it is required for cell division, establishment of mating type, development and memory formation...
  39. pmc Selective modulation of some forms of schaffer collateral-CA1 synaptic plasticity in mice with a disruption of the CPEB-1 gene
    Juan M Alarcon
    College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Learn Mem 11:318-27. 2004
    ..These data suggest that CPEB-1 contributes in the translational control of mRNAs that is critical only for some selected forms of LTP and LTD...
  40. ncbi request reprint Symplekin and xGLD-2 are required for CPEB-mediated cytoplasmic polyadenylation
    Daron C Barnard
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Cell 119:641-51. 2004
    ..The identification of these factors has broad implications for biological process that employ polyadenylation-regulated translation, such as gametogenesis, cell cycle progression, and synaptic plasticity...
  41. pmc Regulated Pumilio-2 binding controls RINGO/Spy mRNA translation and CPEB activation
    Kiran Padmanabhan
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 20:199-209. 2006
    ..These results demonstrate that a reversible Pum2 interaction controls RINGO/Spy mRNA translation and, as a result, CPEB-mediated cytoplasmic polyadenylation...
  42. pmc Differential phosphorylation controls Maskin association with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and localization on the mitotic apparatus
    Daron C Barnard
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, 01605, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 25:7605-15. 2005
    ..These results show that Maskin activity and localization is controlled by differential phosphorylation...
  43. pmc Activity-dependent polyadenylation in neurons
    Ling Du
    University of Massachusetts Medical School, 373 Plantation St, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    RNA 11:1340-7. 2005
    ..These studies show that many mRNAs undergo activity-dependent polyadenylation in neurons and that this process coincides with increased translation in the synapto-dendritic compartment...
  44. ncbi request reprint Human let-7a miRNA blocks protein production on actively translating polyribosomes
    Stephanie Nottrott
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 373 Plantation St, Suite 204, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 13:1108-14. 2006
    ..These data indicate that let-7a miRNA inhibits actively translating polyribosomes. Nascent polypeptide coimmunoprecipitation experiments further suggest that let-7a miRNA interferes with the accumulation of growing polypeptides...
  45. pmc Facilitation of dendritic mRNA transport by CPEB
    Yi Shuian Huang
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Genes Dev 17:638-53. 2003
    ..These results suggest a mechanism whereby CPE-containing mRNAs can be transported to dendrites in a translationally dormant form, but activated at synapses in response to NMDA receptor stimulation...
  46. pmc Amyloid precursor proteins anchor CPEB to membranes and promote polyadenylation-induced translation
    Quiping Cao
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, 01605, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 25:10930-9. 2005
    ..These data demonstrate a link between cytoplasmic polyadenylation and membrane association and implicate APP family member proteins as anchors for localized mRNA polyadenylation and translation...
  47. ncbi request reprint CPEB controls oocyte growth and follicle development in the mouse
    Waldemar J Racki
    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Development 133:4527-37. 2006
    ..Finally, several phenotypes, i.e. progressive oocyte loss and infertility, elicited by the knockdown of CPEB in oocytes resemble those of the human premature ovarian failure syndrome...
  48. ncbi request reprint Synapses go nucle(ol)ar
    Joel D Richter
    Nat Neurosci 10:399-400. 2007
  49. ncbi request reprint Think you know how miRNAs work? Think again
    Joel D Richter
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 15:334-6. 2008

Research Grants29

  1. CPEB and Cell Senescence
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..This proposal focuses on new molecules that regulate cell senescence. Because this process is strongly linked to cancer and ageing, it clearly has important implications for human health. ..
  2. TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL IN EARLY MAMMALIAN DEVELOPMENT
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The importance of CPEB3 for oocytedevelopment will be assessed. The proposed experiments will examine the molecular basis of oocyte development, and thus are relevant to human health especially human reproduction. ..
  3. RNA Localization 2006
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The cross-disciplinary nature of this meeting will be attractive to molecular, cellular, developmental, and neurobiological scientists. ..
  4. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..In particular, we will examine RNA processing and translational control. Because of the fundamental nature of this work, it has important implications for fertility, neurodegeneration, and cancer. ..
  5. CPEB and Cell Senescence
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This proposal focuses on new molecules that regulate cell senescence. Because this process is strongly linked to cancer and ageing, it clearly has important implications for human health. ..
  6. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Finally, an upstream event that is necessary for CPEB-mediated polyadenylation is the translational activation of RINGO/Spy mRNA, which encodes an atypical cyclin B1-like protein. Pumilio is the ..
  7. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel D Richter; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..In particular, we will examine RNA processing and translational control. Because of the fundamental nature of this work, it has important implications for fertility, neurodegeneration, and cancer. ..
  8. CELL BIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  9. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Therefore, mechanistic studies of polyadenylation-induced translation are likely to have important implications for human health. ..
  10. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ....
  11. TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL IN EARLY MAMMALIAN DEVELOPMENT
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Finally, an mRNA that is deadenylated and stored in a dormant form in mouse oocytes undergoes prior CPE-mediated deadenylation. The possible role of mCPEB in the process will be assessed. ..
  12. POLYADENYLATION AND TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL
    Joel Richter; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..The mechanism responsible for, and the biological significance of, this localization will be investigated. ..
  13. CPEB and Cell Senescence
    Joel D Richter; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This proposal focuses on new molecules that regulate cell senescence. Because this process is strongly linked to cancer and ageing, it clearly has important implications for human health. ..