S W Raudenbush

Summary

Affiliation: University of Michigan
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Statistical power and optimal design for multisite randomized trials
    S W Raudenbush
    School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA
    Psychol Methods 5:199-213. 2000
  2. ncbi request reprint Comparing personal trajectories and drawing causal inferences from longitudinal data
    S W Raudenbush
    School of Education and Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, 610 East University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 52:501-25. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint Effects of study duration, frequency of observation, and sample size on power in studies of group differences in polynomial change
    S W Raudenbush
    School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA
    Psychol Methods 6:387-401. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. ncbi request reprint Statistical power and optimal design for multisite randomized trials
    S W Raudenbush
    School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA
    Psychol Methods 5:199-213. 2000
    ..The approach generalizes to quasiexperiments with a similar structure. These ideas are illustrated with newly developed software...
  2. ncbi request reprint Comparing personal trajectories and drawing causal inferences from longitudinal data
    S W Raudenbush
    School of Education and Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, 610 East University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 52:501-25. 2001
    ..The review then considers the problem of drawing causal inferences from repeated measures data...
  3. ncbi request reprint Effects of study duration, frequency of observation, and sample size on power in studies of group differences in polynomial change
    S W Raudenbush
    School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA
    Psychol Methods 6:387-401. 2001
    ..The authors illustrate the approach using data from published studies of antisocial thinking during adolescence and vocabulary growth during infancy...