Tariq M Rana

Summary

Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Medical School
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Specific and potent RNAi in the nucleus of human cells
    G Brett Robb
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 12:133-7. 2005
  2. ncbi Discovery of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with picomolar affinities incorporating N-aryl-oxazolidinone-5-carboxamides as novel P2 ligands
    Akbar Ali
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Med Chem 49:7342-56. 2006
  3. ncbi Design and creation of new nanomaterials for therapeutic RNAi
    Huricha Baigude
    ACS Chem Biol 2:237-41. 2007
  4. ncbi Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating oxazolidinones as P2/P2' ligands in pseudosymmetric dipeptide isosteres
    G S Kiran Kumar Reddy
    Chemical Biology Program and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Med Chem 50:4316-28. 2007
  5. ncbi Illuminating the silence: understanding the structure and function of small RNAs
    Tariq M Rana
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 8:23-36. 2007
  6. pmc Structure-based design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship studies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating phenyloxazolidinones
    Akbar Ali
    University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, United States
    J Med Chem 53:7699-708. 2010
  7. pmc Identification of flavopiridol analogues that selectively inhibit positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) and block HIV-1 replication
    Akbar Ali
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 USA
    Chembiochem 10:2072-80. 2009
  8. pmc Cellular microRNA and P bodies modulate host-HIV-1 interactions
    Robin Nathans
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Mol Cell 34:696-709. 2009
  9. pmc Translation repression in human cells by microRNA-induced gene silencing requires RCK/p54
    Chia Ying Chu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Biol 4:e210. 2006
  10. pmc Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif) inhibitors that block viral replication
    Akbar Ali
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    ChemMedChem 7:1217-29. 2012

Research Grants

  1. TARGETING HIV VIF PROTEIN
    TARIQ RANA; Fiscal Year: 2003

Collaborators

  • Mario Stevenson
  • Ya Lin Chiu
  • Lei Zhang
  • Mark Sharkey
  • Hongxia Zhou
  • Ayseg├╝l Ozen
  • Ruzena Stranska
  • Linghua Qiu
  • Ying Zhou
  • Michael K Gilson
  • Yueh Hsin Ping
  • Beate Schwer
  • Z Xu
  • Hong Cao
  • Akbar Ali
  • Chia Ying Chu
  • Huricha Baigude
  • Chao shun Yang
  • Madhavi N L Nalam
  • G S Kiran Kumar Reddy
  • Joshua McCarroll
  • Robin Nathans
  • Celia A Schiffer
  • Siobhan K O'Brien
  • G Brett Robb
  • Animesh Ghosh
  • Saima Ghafoor Anjum
  • Michael J Wichroski
  • Natalia Sharova
  • Hong Kee Lee
  • Robin S Nathans
  • Michael D Altman
  • Francois Belanger
  • Kirk M Brown
  • Jie Su
  • Natarajan Tamilarasu
  • Bruce Tidor
  • Sripriya Chellappan
  • Visvaldas Kairys
  • Pamela M Swain
  • Hongyan Wang
  • Sara N Richter
  • Chi Wan Lee
  • Kozi Ichiyama
  • Seongwoo Hwang
  • Jonathan D Dinman
  • Venkitasamy Kesavan
  • Kendall L Knight
  • Jinhua Wang
  • Claudia G Lopez
  • Koushik Mukherjee
  • Xinpeng Jiang
  • James Qu
  • Siobhan O'Brien
  • Anna Kristina Serquina
  • Chih Chung Lu
  • Miguel X Fernandes
  • Xugang Xia
  • Ping Zheng
  • Jaspreet Khurana
  • Kuan Teh Jeang
  • Karen Kibler
  • Ronald C Taylor
  • Sara Richter
  • Ewan P Plant
  • Amy B Hammell

Detail Information

Publications46

  1. ncbi Specific and potent RNAi in the nucleus of human cells
    G Brett Robb
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 12:133-7. 2005
    ..These studies reveal new roles for the RNAi machinery in modulating post-transcriptional gene expression in the nucleus...
  2. ncbi Discovery of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with picomolar affinities incorporating N-aryl-oxazolidinone-5-carboxamides as novel P2 ligands
    Akbar Ali
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Med Chem 49:7342-56. 2006
    ..8 pM), and even against the MDR variants it retains picomolar to low nanomolar K(i), which is highly comparable with the best FDA-approved protease inhibitors...
  3. ncbi Design and creation of new nanomaterials for therapeutic RNAi
    Huricha Baigude
    ACS Chem Biol 2:237-41. 2007
    ..iNOP treatment was nontoxic and did not induce an immune response. Our results show that these iNOPs can silence disease-related endogenous genes in clinically acceptable and therapeutically affordable doses...
  4. ncbi Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating oxazolidinones as P2/P2' ligands in pseudosymmetric dipeptide isosteres
    G S Kiran Kumar Reddy
    Chemical Biology Program and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Med Chem 50:4316-28. 2007
    ..Based on the crystal structures and knowledge of structure-activity relationships, new inhibitors can be designed with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies...
  5. ncbi Illuminating the silence: understanding the structure and function of small RNAs
    Tariq M Rana
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 8:23-36. 2007
    ..In particular, it has highlighted the assembly and function of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), and has provided guidelines to efficiently silence genes for biological research and therapeutic applications of RNAi...
  6. pmc Structure-based design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship studies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating phenyloxazolidinones
    Akbar Ali
    University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, United States
    J Med Chem 53:7699-708. 2010
    ..Further optimization of these compounds using structure-based design may lead to the development of novel protease inhibitors with improved activity against drug-resistant strains of HIV-1...
  7. pmc Identification of flavopiridol analogues that selectively inhibit positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) and block HIV-1 replication
    Akbar Ali
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 USA
    Chembiochem 10:2072-80. 2009
    ..These compounds are valuable molecular probes for understanding P-TEFb-regulated cellular and HIV-1 gene transcription and provide potential anti-HIV-1 therapeutics...
  8. pmc Cellular microRNA and P bodies modulate host-HIV-1 interactions
    Robin Nathans
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Mol Cell 34:696-709. 2009
    ..Thus we provide an example of a single host miRNA regulating HIV-1 production and infectivity. These studies highlight the significance of miRNAs and P bodies in modulating host cell interactions with HIV-1 and possibly other viruses...
  9. pmc Translation repression in human cells by microRNA-induced gene silencing requires RCK/p54
    Chia Ying Chu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Biol 4:e210. 2006
    ..These studies also suggest that translation suppression by miRISC does not require P-body structures, and location of miRISC to P-bodies is the consequence of translation repression...
  10. pmc Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif) inhibitors that block viral replication
    Akbar Ali
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    ChemMedChem 7:1217-29. 2012
    ....
  11. pmc Small-molecule inhibition of HIV-1 Vif
    Robin Nathans
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 26:1187-92. 2008
    ..These results demonstrate that the HIV-1 Vif-A3G axis is a valid target for developing small molecule-based new therapies for HIV infection or for enhancing innate immunity against viruses...
  12. ncbi Quantitative analysis of RNA-mediated protein-protein interactions in living cells by FRET
    Ya Lin Chiu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Chem Biol Drug Des 69:233-9. 2007
    ....
  13. pmc Modulating HIV-1 replication by RNA interference directed against human transcription elongation factor SPT5
    Yueh Hsin Ping
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Retrovirology 1:46. 2004
    ....
  14. pmc Human retroviral host restriction factors APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F localize to mRNA processing bodies
    Michael J Wichroski
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Pathog 2:e41. 2006
    ..Taken together, the results of this study reveal a novel link between innate immunity against retroviruses and P-bodies suggesting that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F could function in the context of P-bodies to restrict HIV-1 replication...
  15. pmc Design and assembly of new nonviral RNAi delivery agents by microwave-assisted quaternization (MAQ) of tertiary amines
    Animesh Ghosh
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 21:1581-7. 2010
    ..This strategy can be employed to develop new classes of nonviral gene delivery agents under safe and fast reaction conditions...
  16. pmc Evaluating the substrate-envelope hypothesis: structural analysis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors designed to be robust against drug resistance
    Madhavi N L Nalam
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    J Virol 84:5368-78. 2010
    ....
  17. pmc P-TEFb kinase complex phosphorylates histone H1 to regulate expression of cellular and HIV-1 genes
    Siobhan K O'Brien
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:29713-20. 2010
    ..We identify histone H1 as a novel P-TEFb substrate, and our results suggest new roles for P-TEFb in both cellular and HIV-1 transcription...
  18. pmc U30 of 7SK RNA forms a specific photo-cross-link with Hexim1 in the context of both a minimal RNA-binding site and a fully reconstituted 7SK/Hexim1/P-TEFb ribonucleoprotein complex
    Francois Belanger
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605 2324, USA
    J Mol Biol 386:1094-107. 2009
    ..Our results demonstrate directly that the Hexim1 binding site is located in the 24-87 region of 7SK RNA and that the protein residues outside the basic domain of Hexim1 are involved in specific RNA interactions...
  19. ncbi Dissecting RNA-interference pathway with small molecules
    Ya Lin Chiu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Chem Biol 12:643-8. 2005
    ..ATPA-18 analogs will therefore provide a new class of small molecules for studying RNAi mechanisms in a variety of model organisms and deciphering in vivo genetic functions through reverse genetics...
  20. ncbi Design and synthesis of a novel peptidomimetic inhibitor of HIV-1 Tat-TAR interactions: squaryldiamide as a new potential bioisostere of unsubstituted guanidine
    Chi Wan Lee
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 2324, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 15:4243-6. 2005
    ....
  21. pmc Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by RNA interference directed against human transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (CDK9/CyclinT1)
    Ya Lin Chiu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Virol 78:2517-29. 2004
    ....
  22. ncbi Orientation and affinity of HIV-1 Tat fragments in Tat-TAR complex determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer
    Hong Cao
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 17:352-8. 2006
    ..Our results suggest that the N- and C-termini of Tat (38-72) are close to each other when the peptide is folded and that the peptide does not go through a large structural change upon TAR binding...
  23. pmc Phosphorylation of histone H1 by P-TEFb is a necessary step in skeletal muscle differentiation
    Siobhan K O'Brien
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
    J Cell Physiol 227:383-9. 2012
    ..We determine that both P-TEFb activity and H1 phosphorylation are necessary for the full differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes...
  24. ncbi RNA helicase A interacts with RISC in human cells and functions in RISC loading
    G Brett Robb
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Mol Cell 26:523-37. 2007
    ..Our results identify RHA as a RISC component and demonstrate that RHA functions in RISC as an siRNA-loading factor...
  25. ncbi Discovery of a small molecule Tat-trans-activation-responsive RNA antagonist that potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus-1 replication
    Seongwoo Hwang
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605 2324, USA
    J Biol Chem 278:39092-103. 2003
    ..Our results also suggest a general strategy for discovering pharmacophores targeting RNA structures that are essential in progression of other infectious, inflammatory, and genetic diseases...
  26. ncbi Target accessibility dictates the potency of human RISC
    Kirk M Brown
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 12:469-70. 2005
    ..Kinetic studies revealed that siRNA-programmed RISC(*) cleaved target RNA with higher efficiencies when target site access was increased. These results provide evidence that target site access is linked to RISC(*) catalysis...
  27. ncbi Visualizing a correlation between siRNA localization, cellular uptake, and RNAi in living cells
    Ya Lin Chiu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Chem Biol 11:1165-75. 2004
    ..These results suggest that interactions with RISC dictate siRNA localization even when siRNA is conjugated to TAT(47-57) peptide...
  28. pmc Evolutionary emergence of microRNAs in human embryonic stem cells
    Hong Cao
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2820. 2008
    ..One could imagine that this burst of miRNA gene clusters at specific chromosomes was part of an evolutionary event during species divergence...
  29. ncbi Small RNAs: regulators and guardians of the genome
    Chia Ying Chu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Cell Physiol 213:412-9. 2007
    ....
  30. pmc Silencing microRNA by interfering nanoparticles in mice
    Jie Su
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 39:e38. 2011
    ..Our results demonstrate that iNOPs can successfully deliver anti-miR to specifically target and silence miRNA in clinically acceptable and therapeutically affordable doses...
  31. pmc Potent RNAi by short RNA triggers
    Chia Ying Chu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    RNA 14:1714-9. 2008
    ..These results suggest that RISC assembly and activation during RNAi does not necessarily require a 19-nt duplex siRNA and that 16-nt duplexes can be designed as more potent triggers to induce RNAi...
  32. ncbi Design, microwave-assisted synthesis, and photophysical properties of small molecule organic antennas for luminescence resonance energy transfer
    Hong Kee Lee
    Program in Chemical Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Comb Chem 7:279-84. 2005
    ..Two of these analogues showed very favorable fluorescence profiles and have the potential to be used as small molecule organic antennas for LRET studies...
  33. pmc siRNA function in RNAi: a chemical modification analysis
    Ya Lin Chiu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    RNA 9:1034-48. 2003
    ..Collectively, this study defines the mechanisms of RNAi in human cells and provides new rules for designing effective and stable siRNAs for RNAi-mediated gene-silencing applications...
  34. ncbi Analysis of HIV-1 viral infectivity factor-mediated proteasome-dependent depletion of APOBEC3G: correlating function and subcellular localization
    Michael J Wichroski
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:8387-96. 2005
    ..Taken together, these results demonstrate that cytoplasmic Vif-APOBEC3G interactions are required but are not sufficient for Vif to modulate APOBEC3G and can be monitored by co-localization in vivo...
  35. pmc Nanotubes functionalized with lipids and natural amino acid dendrimers: a new strategy to create nanomaterials for delivering systemic RNAi
    Joshua McCarroll
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 21:56-63. 2010
    ..This new technology not only can be used for systemic RNAi, but may also be used to deliver other drugs in vivo...
  36. pmc Dynamics of nascent mRNA folding and RNA-protein interactions: an alternative TAR RNA structure is involved in the control of HIV-1 mRNA transcription
    Sara N Richter
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605 2324, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 34:4278-92. 2006
    ..Finally, our results provide a new experimental strategy for studying mRNA conformation changes during transcription that can be applied to investigate the folding and function of nascent RNA structures transcribed from other promoters...
  37. ncbi Tat stimulates cotranscriptional capping of HIV mRNA
    Ya Lin Chiu
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Mol Cell 10:585-97. 2002
    ..Our findings implicate capping in an elongation checkpoint critical to HIV gene expression...
  38. ncbi Solid-phase synthesis of alpha-(2-(benzylthio)-1,4-dihydro-6-methyl-4-p-tolylpyrimidine-5-carboxamido) acids: a new strategy to create diversity in heterocyclic scaffolds
    Lei Zhang
    Program in Chemical Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Comb Chem 6:457-9. 2004
  39. pmc Discovery of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and anticancer drug enhancing reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem cell generation
    Chao shun Yang
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
    Stem Cells 29:1528-36. 2011
    ..This hypothesis-driven approach provides an alternative to shot-gun screening and accelerates understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying iPSC induction...
  40. ncbi Mechanism of site-specific psoralen photoadducts formation in triplex DNA directed by psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotides
    Yueh Hsin Ping
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Biochemistry 44:2501-9. 2005
    ..Taken together, these studies provide new insight into the mechanism associated with the formation of psoralen photoadducts that are directed by psoTFO during triplex formation...
  41. ncbi A new class of RNA-binding oligomers: peptoid amide and ester analogues
    Venkitasamy Kesavan
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605 2324, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 13:1171-5. 2002
    ..These results show that we have identified a new class of unnatural oligomers for RNA targeting...
  42. pmc Therapeutic gene silencing delivered by a chemically modified small interfering RNA against mutant SOD1 slows amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression
    Hongyan Wang
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Chemical Biology Program, Cell Biology, and Neuroscience Program, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Biol Chem 283:15845-52. 2008
    ..These results bring RNA interference therapy one step closer to its clinical application for treatment of chronic, devastating, and fatal CNS disorders...
  43. ncbi Microwave-assisted parallel synthesis of a 4,6-diamino-2,2-dimethyl-1,2-dihydro-1-phenyl-s-triazine library
    Hong Kee Lee
    Program in Chemical Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    J Comb Chem 6:504-8. 2004
    ..Isolated yields of all the compounds were comparable when the two methods were used...
  44. ncbi RNAi in human cells: basic structural and functional features of small interfering RNA
    Ya Lin Chiu
    Chemical Biology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Mol Cell 10:549-61. 2002
    ..These results suggest that RNA amplification by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is not essential for RNAi in human cells...
  45. pmc HIV-1 protease inhibitors from inverse design in the substrate envelope exhibit subnanomolar binding to drug-resistant variants
    Michael D Altman
    Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 130:6099-113. 2008
    ....
  46. pmc The frameshift signal of HIV-1 involves a potential intramolecular triplex RNA structure
    Jonathan D Dinman
    Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, 2135 Microbiology Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:5331-6. 2002
    ..We suggest that the potential intramolecular triplex structure is essential for viral propagation and viability, and that small molecules targeted to this RNA structure may possess antiretroviral activities...

Research Grants1

  1. TARGETING HIV VIF PROTEIN
    TARIQ RANA; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..These pharmacological probes of Vif function can provide important new insights into HIV biology. ..