David A Raichlen

Summary

Affiliation: University of Arizona
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Exercise, APOE genotype, and the evolution of the human lifespan
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA Electronic address
    Trends Neurosci 37:247-55. 2014
  2. doi request reprint Exercise-induced endocannabinoid signaling is modulated by intensity
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 113:869-75. 2013
  3. pmc Linking brains and brawn: exercise and the evolution of human neurobiology
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20122250. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Wired to run: exercise-induced endocannabinoid signaling in humans and cursorial mammals with implications for the 'runner's high'
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:1331-6. 2012
  5. pmc Laetoli footprints preserve earliest direct evidence of human-like bipedal biomechanics
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e9769. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Calcaneus length determines running economy: implications for endurance running performance in modern humans and Neandertals
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:299-308. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Causes and significance of variation in mammalian basal metabolism
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Drive, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 180:301-11. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Understanding hind limb weight support in chimpanzees with implications for the evolution of primate locomotion
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 138:395-402. 2009
  9. ncbi request reprint The effects of gravity on human walking: a new test of the dynamic similarity hypothesis using a predictive model
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Drive, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:2767-72. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint The Laetoli footprints and early hominin locomotor kinematics
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Drive, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Hum Evol 54:112-7. 2008

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. pmc Exercise, APOE genotype, and the evolution of the human lifespan
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA Electronic address
    Trends Neurosci 37:247-55. 2014
    ..This multidisciplinary approach links human evolution with health and provides a complementary perspective on aging and neurodegenerative disease that may help identify key mechanisms and targets for intervention. ..
  2. doi request reprint Exercise-induced endocannabinoid signaling is modulated by intensity
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Eur J Appl Physiol 113:869-75. 2013
    ..Thus, future studies examining the role of exercise-induced eCB signaling on neurobiology or physiology must take exercise intensity into account...
  3. pmc Linking brains and brawn: exercise and the evolution of human neurobiology
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20122250. 2013
    ..This hypothesis suggests that a significant portion of human neurobiology evolved due to selection acting on features unrelated to cognitive performance...
  4. doi request reprint Wired to run: exercise-induced endocannabinoid signaling in humans and cursorial mammals with implications for the 'runner's high'
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:1331-6. 2012
    ....
  5. pmc Laetoli footprints preserve earliest direct evidence of human-like bipedal biomechanics
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e9769. 2010
    ..Determining the kinematics of Laetoli hominins will allow us to understand whether selection acted to decrease energy costs of bipedalism by 3.6 Ma...
  6. doi request reprint Calcaneus length determines running economy: implications for endurance running performance in modern humans and Neandertals
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Hum Evol 60:299-308. 2011
    ..We hypothesize that ER performance may have been reduced in Neandertals because they lived in cold climates...
  7. ncbi request reprint Causes and significance of variation in mammalian basal metabolism
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Drive, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 180:301-11. 2010
    ..These results suggest that selection alters BMR in response to thermoregulatory pressures, and that selection uses muscle mass as a means to generate this variation...
  8. doi request reprint Understanding hind limb weight support in chimpanzees with implications for the evolution of primate locomotion
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 138:395-402. 2009
    ..The latter hypothesis raises the intriguing possibility that primate weight support patterns actually evolved as byproducts of other traits, or spandrels, rather than as adaptations to increase forelimb mobility...
  9. ncbi request reprint The effects of gravity on human walking: a new test of the dynamic similarity hypothesis using a predictive model
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Drive, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:2767-72. 2008
    ..Thus, the DSH does account for differences in the inertial forces governing locomotion (e.g. differences in hip height) as well as differences in the gravitational forces governing locomotion...
  10. ncbi request reprint The Laetoli footprints and early hominin locomotor kinematics
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Drive, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Hum Evol 54:112-7. 2008
    ..Despite the many attempts to discern limb-joint kinematics from Laetoli stride lengths, our study concludes that stride lengths alone do not resolve the debate over early hominin locomotor postures...
  11. pmc Relationship between exercise capacity and brain size in mammals
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20601. 2011
    ..It is possible that exercise and neurobiology are related across evolutionary time. To test this hypothesis, this study examines the association between exercise and brain size across a wide range of mammals...
  12. doi request reprint Control and function of arm swing in human walking and running
    Herman Pontzer
    Department of Anthropology, Washington University, 119 McMillan Hall, Saint Louis, MO 63130, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:523-34. 2009
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Muscle force production during bent-knee, bent-hip walking in humans
    Adam D Foster
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Drive, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    J Hum Evol 65:294-302. 2013
    ..We explore the implications of these results for interpreting locomotor energetics in early hominins, including australopithecines and Ardipithecus ramidus...
  14. pmc Evidence of Levy walk foraging patterns in human hunter-gatherers
    David A Raichlen
    School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:728-33. 2014
    ..Additionally, Lévy walks may have become common early in our genus when hunting and gathering arose as a major foraging strategy, playing an important role in the evolution of human mobility. ..
  15. doi request reprint The metabolic cost of walking in humans, chimpanzees, and early hominins
    Herman Pontzer
    Washington University, Department of Anthropology, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    J Hum Evol 56:43-54. 2009
    ..This supports the hypothesis that locomotor energy economy was an important evolutionary pressure on hominin bipedalism...
  16. ncbi request reprint Ontogeny of limb mass distribution in infant baboons (Papio cynocephalus)
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 49:452-67. 2005
    ..These results suggest that functional demands placed on the limbs during ontogeny have a strong impact on the development of limb mass distribution patterns...
  17. ncbi request reprint Lateral sequence walking in infant Papio cynocephalus: implications for the evolution of diagonal sequence walking in primates
    Liza J Shapiro
    Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 126:205-13. 2005
    ..Further insight into this issue will likely be gained by observations of primate quadrupedalism in natural environments, where the use of lateral sequence gaits might be more common than currently known...
  18. pmc Chimpanzee locomotor energetics and the origin of human bipedalism
    Michael D Sockol
    Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:12265-9. 2007
    ..Analyses of these features in early fossil hominins, coupled with analyses of bipedal walking in chimpanzees, indicate that bipedalism in early, ape-like hominins could indeed have been less costly than quadrupedal knucklewalking...
  19. ncbi request reprint Effects of limb mass distribution on mechanical power outputs during quadrupedalism
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:633-44. 2006
    ....
  20. pmc Hunter-gatherer energetics and human obesity
    Herman Pontzer
    Department of Anthropology, Hunter College, New York, New York, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e40503. 2012
    ..We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences...
  21. ncbi request reprint The human gluteus maximus and its role in running
    Daniel E Lieberman
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:2143-55. 2006
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Effects of limb mass distribution on the ontogeny of quadrupedalism in infant baboons (Papio cynocephalus) and implications for the evolution of primate quadrupedalism
    David A Raichlen
    Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Hum Evol 49:415-31. 2005
    ..These results suggest that the evolution of primate quadrupedal kinematics was tied to the evolution of grasping hands and feet...
  23. pmc Metabolic adaptation for low energy throughput in orangutans
    Herman Pontzer
    Department of Anthropology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:14048-52. 2010
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Human quadrupeds, primate quadrupedalism, and uner tan syndrome
    Liza J Shapiro
    Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e101758. 2014
    ..We conclude that quadrupedalism in healthy adults or those with a physical disability can be explained using biomechanical principles rather than evolutionary assumptions. ..
  25. doi request reprint Bipedal and quadrupedal locomotion in chimpanzees
    Herman Pontzer
    Department of Anthropology, Hunter College, 728 North Building, 695 Park Ave, New York, NY 10065, USA New York Consortium for Evolutionary Primatology, New York, NY, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 66:64-82. 2014
    ..However, habitual bipedalism may have favored modifications of the hip to allow a more orthograde posture, and of the hind limb abductor mechanisms to efficiently exert mediolateral ground forces. ..
  26. ncbi request reprint The evolution of endurance running and the tyranny of ethnography: a reply to Pickering and Bunn (2007)
    Daniel E Lieberman
    J Hum Evol 53:439-42. 2007