T Pyszczynski

Summary

Affiliation: University of Colorado
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint A dual-process model of defense against conscious and unconscious death-related thoughts: an extension of terror management theory
    T Pyszczynski
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs 80933 7150, USA
    Psychol Rev 106:835-45. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Suppression, accessibility of death-related thoughts, and cultural worldview defense: exploring the psychodynamics of terror management
    J Arndt
    Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 73:5-18. 1997
  3. ncbi request reprint Stereotypes and terror management: evidence that mortality salience enhances stereotypic thinking and preferences
    J Schimel
    Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 77:905-26. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Death, sex, love, and neuroticism: why is sex such a problem?
    J L Goldenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs 80933 7150, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 77:1173-87. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint The body as a source of self-esteem: the effect of mortality salience on identification with one's body, interest in sex, and appearance monitoring
    J L Goldenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 79:118-30. 2000
  6. ncbi request reprint Being accepted for who we are: evidence that social validation of the intrinsic self reduces general defensiveness
    J Schimel
    Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 80:35-52. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint I am not an animal: mortality salience, disgust, and the denial of human creatureliness
    J L Goldenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 130:427-35. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint A dual-process model of defense against conscious and unconscious death-related thoughts: an extension of terror management theory
    T Pyszczynski
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs 80933 7150, USA
    Psychol Rev 106:835-45. 1999
    ..Experimental evidence for this analysis is presented...
  2. ncbi request reprint Suppression, accessibility of death-related thoughts, and cultural worldview defense: exploring the psychodynamics of terror management
    J Arndt
    Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 73:5-18. 1997
    ..Implications of these findings for understanding both terror management processes and psychological defense in general are discussed...
  3. ncbi request reprint Stereotypes and terror management: evidence that mortality salience enhances stereotypic thinking and preferences
    J Schimel
    Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 77:905-26. 1999
    ..Study 5 showed that, among participants high in need for closure, mortality salience led to decreased liking for a stereotype-inconsistent gay man...
  4. ncbi request reprint Death, sex, love, and neuroticism: why is sex such a problem?
    J L Goldenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs 80933 7150, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 77:1173-87. 1999
    ..These findings provide insight into why people high in neuroticism have conflicting thoughts about sexuality and why sexuality is so often regulated and romanticized...
  5. ncbi request reprint The body as a source of self-esteem: the effect of mortality salience on identification with one's body, interest in sex, and appearance monitoring
    J L Goldenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 79:118-30. 2000
    ..These findings provide insight into why people often go to extreme lengths to meet cultural standards for the body and its appearance...
  6. ncbi request reprint Being accepted for who we are: evidence that social validation of the intrinsic self reduces general defensiveness
    J Schimel
    Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 80:35-52. 2001
    ..In all 3 studies, similar reductions in defensiveness were not found when liking was based on achievements. Discussion focuses on implications for understanding the functional value of different bases of self-worth...
  7. ncbi request reprint I am not an animal: mortality salience, disgust, and the denial of human creatureliness
    J L Goldenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 130:427-35. 2001
    ..The implications of these results for understanding why humans are so invested in beautifying their bodies and denying creaturely aspects of themselves are discussed...