T M Piasecki

Summary

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Profiles in discouragement: two studies of variability in the time course of smoking withdrawal symptoms
    T M Piasecki
    Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin Madison, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 107:238-51. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Smoking withdrawal dynamics in unaided quitters
    T M Piasecki
    Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison 53706, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 109:74-86. 2000
  3. ncbi request reprint Strike while the iron is hot: can stepped-care treatments resurrect relapsing smokers?
    S S Smith
    Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison 53711 2027, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 69:429-39. 2001

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. ncbi request reprint Profiles in discouragement: two studies of variability in the time course of smoking withdrawal symptoms
    T M Piasecki
    Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin Madison, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 107:238-51. 1998
    ..Measures of negative affect closely tracked withdrawal symptoms over time within clusters. Topics for future smoking withdrawal research are discussed...
  2. ncbi request reprint Smoking withdrawal dynamics in unaided quitters
    T M Piasecki
    Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison 53706, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 109:74-86. 2000
    ..These results suggest that affect and urge withdrawal symptoms make independent contributions to relapse and that relapse is related to both symptom severity and trajectory...
  3. ncbi request reprint Strike while the iron is hot: can stepped-care treatments resurrect relapsing smokers?
    S S Smith
    Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison 53711 2027, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 69:429-39. 2001
    ..Neither CBT nor MIS treatment improved long-term abstinence rates relative to BI. Limited support was found for the hypothesis that high-risk smokers would benefit more from MIS than CBT. Other hypotheses were not supported...