Charles H Peterson

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Multi-year persistence of beach habitat degradation from nourishment using coarse shelly sediments
    Charles H Peterson
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, NC 28557, USA Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236, USA Electronic address
    Sci Total Environ 487:481-92. 2014
  2. ncbi request reprint Long-term ecosystem response to the Exxon Valdez oil spill
    Charles H Peterson
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, NC 28557, USA
    Science 302:2082-6. 2003
  3. pmc Prey distribution, physical habitat features, and guild traits interact to produce contrasting shorebird assemblages among foraging patches
    Beth M Vandusen
    Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Morehead City, NC, USA
    PLoS ONE 7:e52694. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Practical proxies for tidal marsh ecosystem services: application to injury and restoration
    Charles H Peterson
    Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Morehead City, North Carolina 28557, USA
    Adv Mar Biol 54:221-66. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint When r-selection may not predict introduced-species proliferation: predation of a nonnative oyster
    Melanie J Bishop
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, North Carolina 28557, USA
    Ecol Appl 16:718-30. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Depletion, degradation, and recovery potential of estuaries and coastal seas
    Heike K Lotze
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 312:1806-9. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Cascading effects of the loss of apex predatory sharks from a coastal ocean
    Ransom A Myers
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada
    Science 315:1846-50. 2007
  8. doi request reprint Interacting effects of temperature and salinity on Bonamia sp. parasitism in the Asian oyster Crassostrea ariakensis
    Corinne Audemard
    Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Route 1208 Greate Road, Gloucester Point, VA 23062, USA
    J Invertebr Pathol 98:344-50. 2008

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Multi-year persistence of beach habitat degradation from nourishment using coarse shelly sediments
    Charles H Peterson
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, NC 28557, USA Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236, USA Electronic address
    Sci Total Environ 487:481-92. 2014
    ..Recognizing that recovery following nourishment can be slow, studies that monitor impacts for only several months are inadequate. ..
  2. ncbi request reprint Long-term ecosystem response to the Exxon Valdez oil spill
    Charles H Peterson
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, NC 28557, USA
    Science 302:2082-6. 2003
    ..Delayed population reductions and cascades of indirect effects postponed recovery. Development of ecosystem-based toxicology is required to understand and ultimately predict chronic, delayed, and indirect long-term risks and impacts...
  3. pmc Prey distribution, physical habitat features, and guild traits interact to produce contrasting shorebird assemblages among foraging patches
    Beth M Vandusen
    Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Morehead City, NC, USA
    PLoS ONE 7:e52694. 2012
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Practical proxies for tidal marsh ecosystem services: application to injury and restoration
    Charles H Peterson
    Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Morehead City, North Carolina 28557, USA
    Adv Mar Biol 54:221-66. 2008
    ..Empirical research on recovery trajectories in previously injured marshes could reduce the largest source of uncertainty in quantifying cumulative service losses...
  5. ncbi request reprint When r-selection may not predict introduced-species proliferation: predation of a nonnative oyster
    Melanie J Bishop
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, North Carolina 28557, USA
    Ecol Appl 16:718-30. 2006
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Depletion, degradation, and recovery potential of estuaries and coastal seas
    Heike K Lotze
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 312:1806-9. 2006
    ..Our results provide detailed historical baselines and quantitative targets for ecosystem-based management and marine conservation...
  7. ncbi request reprint Cascading effects of the loss of apex predatory sharks from a coastal ocean
    Ransom A Myers
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada
    Science 315:1846-50. 2007
    ..Analogous top-down effects may be a predictable consequence of eliminating entire functional groups of predators...
  8. doi request reprint Interacting effects of temperature and salinity on Bonamia sp. parasitism in the Asian oyster Crassostrea ariakensis
    Corinne Audemard
    Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Route 1208 Greate Road, Gloucester Point, VA 23062, USA
    J Invertebr Pathol 98:344-50. 2008
    ..in C. ariakensis will need to be further investigated, the results presented here suggest that Bonamia sp. may be able to persist in C. ariakensis under a combination of low temperature and meso- to euhaline salinities...