NIKOLAOS PEPPAS

Summary

Affiliation: University of Texas
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Therapeutic applications of hydrogels in oral drug delivery
    Lindsey A Sharpe
    The University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, TX 78712, USA 1 512 471 6644 1 512 471 8227
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 11:901-15. 2014
  2. doi request reprint Historical perspective on advanced drug delivery: how engineering design and mathematical modeling helped the field mature
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 65:5-9. 2013
  3. ncbi request reprint Stimuli-sensitive hydrogels: ideal carriers for chronobiology and chronotherapy
    Nicholas A Peppas
    The University of Texas, Departments of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering and Division of Pharmaceutics, 1 University Station, C0400, CPE 3 466, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 15:125-44. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Intelligent therapeutics: biomimetic systems and nanotechnology in drug delivery
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Laboratory of Biomaterials, Department of Chemical Engineering and Division of Pharmaceutics, The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:1529-31. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomimetic materials and micropatterned structures using iniferters
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, CPE 3 466, 1 University Station, C 0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:1587-97. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Nanoscale technology of mucoadhesive interactions
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, CPE 3 466, 1 University Station, C 0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:1675-87. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint [New intelligent and targetted drug delivery systems. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications]
    N A Peppas
    Department of Chemical, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Ann Pharm Fr 64:260-75. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Novel complexation hydrogels for oral peptide delivery: in vitro evaluation of their cytocompatibility and insulin-transport enhancing effects using Caco-2 cell monolayers
    Hideki Ichikawa
    Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Molecular Recognition Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 0231, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 67:609-17. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Devices based on intelligent biopolymers for oral protein delivery
    N A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 1062, USA
    Int J Pharm 277:11-7. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Nanoscale analysis of protein and peptide absorption: insulin absorption using complexation and pH-sensitive hydrogels as delivery vehicles
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Eur J Pharm Sci 29:183-97. 2006

Research Grants

  1. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    Nicholas Peppas; Fiscal Year: 2007
  2. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    Nicholas Peppas; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2006
  4. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2005
  5. PH SENSITIVE COMPLEX HYDROGEL FOR PROTEIN DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2001
  6. PH SENSITIVE COMPLEX HYDROGEL FOR PROTEIN DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2000
  7. PH-SENSITIVE HYDROGELS FOR DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1992
  8. PH-SENSITIVE HYDROGELS FOR DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1991
  9. PH-SENSITIVE HYDROGELS FOR DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1990
  10. PH SENSITIVE COMPLEX HYDROGEL FOR PROTEIN DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1999

Collaborators

  • M Morishita
  • Mamoru Fukuda
  • Mark E Byrne
  • Hideki Ichikawa
  • J Zachary Hilt
  • Bumsang Kim
  • R Bettini
  • J Kristl
  • Patrizia Santi
  • Kinam Park
  • Michael H Smolensky
  • Nikhil J Kavimandan
  • Carolyn L Bayer
  • Laura Serra
  • Kristy M Wood
  • James Blanchette
  • Daniel A Carr
  • Terry G Farmer
  • Donald E Owens
  • Elena Losi
  • Ebru Oral
  • Jennifer E López
  • Aaron C Foss
  • Lindsey A Sharpe
  • Madeline Torres-Lugo
  • Takahiro Goto
  • Koji Nakamura
  • Tania Betancourt
  • Justin P Shofner
  • Mary Caldorera-Moore
  • Gregory M Stone
  • Omar Z Fisher
  • Thomas F Edgar
  • Ahmed Besheer
  • Tetsuo Yamagata
  • Kozo Takayama
  • Siddarth Venkatesh
  • Marcos Garcia
  • William Leobandung
  • Rae Record
  • Sarena D Horava
  • Saia Baumgartner
  • Adam M Daily
  • Alper A Konuk
  • Isis J Trenchard
  • Margaret A Phillips
  • Juan Pardo
  • Ken Soo
  • Timothy Kim
  • Stephen R Dietz
  • Josep Domenech
  • Jackson K Eby
  • Yicun Jian
  • Fabio Sonvico
  • Gaia Colombo
  • Yu Fukuoka
  • Joseph Domenech
  • Jeffrey J Wilson
  • Paolo Colombo
  • Kristine Lofthus
  • KARSTEN MADER
  • Jose Doménech
  • Jennifer S Brodbelt
  • Anthony M Lowman
  • Nikhil Kavimandan
  • Jeffrey I Joseph
  • Robert J Murray
  • Yoshinobu Fukumori

Detail Information

Publications65

  1. ncbi request reprint Therapeutic applications of hydrogels in oral drug delivery
    Lindsey A Sharpe
    The University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Austin, TX 78712, USA 1 512 471 6644 1 512 471 8227
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 11:901-15. 2014
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Historical perspective on advanced drug delivery: how engineering design and mathematical modeling helped the field mature
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 65:5-9. 2013
    ..Emphasis is given on the advances of biomaterials as drug delivery agents and on the use of design equations and mathematical modeling to achieve a wide range of successful systems...
  3. ncbi request reprint Stimuli-sensitive hydrogels: ideal carriers for chronobiology and chronotherapy
    Nicholas A Peppas
    The University of Texas, Departments of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering and Division of Pharmaceutics, 1 University Station, C0400, CPE 3 466, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 15:125-44. 2004
    ..Here we examine how to design novel chrono-pharmacological drug-delivery systems that should be able to release the therapeutic agents at predetermined intervals...
  4. ncbi request reprint Intelligent therapeutics: biomimetic systems and nanotechnology in drug delivery
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Laboratory of Biomaterials, Department of Chemical Engineering and Division of Pharmaceutics, The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:1529-31. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomimetic materials and micropatterned structures using iniferters
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, CPE 3 466, 1 University Station, C 0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:1587-97. 2004
    ..The block copolymers would be used in the synthesis of micropatterned polymer films for use in biomaterials and other biomedical applications...
  6. ncbi request reprint Nanoscale technology of mucoadhesive interactions
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, CPE 3 466, 1 University Station, C 0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 56:1675-87. 2004
    ..Finally, formation of micro- or nanopatterns on these surfaces can lead to promising new systems of oral delivery applications...
  7. ncbi request reprint [New intelligent and targetted drug delivery systems. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications]
    N A Peppas
    Department of Chemical, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Ann Pharm Fr 64:260-75. 2006
    ..We review herein polymers as biomaterials, materials and approaches used in drug and protein delivery systems, materials used as scaffolds in tissue engineering, and nanotechnology and microfabrication techniques applied to biomaterials...
  8. ncbi request reprint Novel complexation hydrogels for oral peptide delivery: in vitro evaluation of their cytocompatibility and insulin-transport enhancing effects using Caco-2 cell monolayers
    Hideki Ichikawa
    Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Molecular Recognition Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 0231, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 67:609-17. 2003
    ..18 and 24.78 x 10(-8) cm/s. The results demonstrate that the P(MAA-g-EG) hydrogel microparticles could be used as a cytocompatible carrier possessing the transport-enhancing effect of insulin on the intestinal epithelial cells...
  9. ncbi request reprint Devices based on intelligent biopolymers for oral protein delivery
    N A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 1062, USA
    Int J Pharm 277:11-7. 2004
    ..The results of additional in vitro studies have shown that insulin release rates can be controlled by appropriate adjustment of the structure of the gels...
  10. ncbi request reprint Nanoscale analysis of protein and peptide absorption: insulin absorption using complexation and pH-sensitive hydrogels as delivery vehicles
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Eur J Pharm Sci 29:183-97. 2006
    ..These synthetic materials can be used as unique systems or incorporated into existing drug delivery technologies that can aid in the removal or delivery of biomolecules and restore the natural profiles of compounds in the body...
  11. pmc Molecular aspects of mucoadhesive carrier development for drug delivery and improved absorption
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Departments of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and Division of Pharmaceutics, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0400, CPE 3 468, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 20:1-20. 2009
    ..Here we discuss the theoretical framework for achieving mucoadhesive systems as related to biomaterials science and the structure of the biomaterials used...
  12. ncbi request reprint Oral insulin delivery using P(MAA-g-EG) hydrogels: effects of network morphology on insulin delivery characteristics
    Koji Nakamura
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    J Control Release 95:589-99. 2004
    ..In these studies, bioavailabilities ranged from 4.6% to 7.2% and were dependent on reaction solvent content...
  13. pmc Cellular evaluation of synthesized insulin/transferrin bioconjugates for oral insulin delivery using intelligent complexation hydrogels
    Justin P Shofner
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Macromol Biosci 10:299-306. 2010
    ..8 x 10(9) cm . s(-1). The presence of the microparticles in solution was found to improve conjugate transport by nearly 100% with little to no change in cell monolayer integrity...
  14. ncbi request reprint Cellular evaluation of oral chemotherapy carriers
    James Blanchette
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin Texas 78712 0231, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 72:381-8. 2005
    ..The carriers described performed well during in vitro evaluation and can hopefully expand the spectrum of chemotherapeutic agents capable of being administered orally...
  15. ncbi request reprint Novel delivery system based on complexation hydrogels as delivery vehicles for insulin-transferrin conjugates
    Nikhil J Kavimandan
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Biomaterials 27:3846-54. 2006
    ..They can also inhibit the degradation of insulin in the GI tract. Thus, combination of these two approaches may provide an innovative platform for oral insulin delivery...
  16. pmc Wheat germ agglutinin functionalized complexation hydrogels for oral insulin delivery
    Kristy M Wood
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Biomacromolecules 9:1293-8. 2008
    ..From these studies, it is concluded that the addition of the WGA on the microparticles produces a specific adhesion to carbohydrate-containing surfaces and that P(MAA-g-EG) WGA shows great promise as an oral insulin delivery system...
  17. ncbi request reprint Design of poly(ethylene glycol)-tethered copolymers as novel mucoadhesive drug delivery systems
    Laura Serra
    Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, Bionanotechnology and Molecular Recognition Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Eur J Pharm Biopharm 63:11-8. 2006
    ..AA functional groups allowed the polymer to form multiple hydrogen bonds with the glycoproteins present in the mucus. PEG tethers possibly acted as mucoadhesive promoters, enhancing interpenetration of polymer chains into the mucus...
  18. pmc Assessment of poly(methacrylic acid-co-N-vinyl pyrrolidone) as a carrier for the oral delivery of therapeutic proteins using Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cell lines
    Daniel A Carr
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 92:504-12. 2010
    ..Therefore, microparticles of this system were best suited for oral delivery of therapeutic agents that do not require transport facilitation...
  19. ncbi request reprint Principles of transmucosal delivery of therapeutic agents
    James Blanchette
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Biomed Pharmacother 58:142-51. 2004
    ..The foundations of this research as well as recent advances are reviewed along with a discussion of the challenges of oral administration and other emerging strategies for oral administration...
  20. ncbi request reprint Applications of biomimetic systems in drug delivery
    Siddarth Venkatesh
    Biomedical Devices and Drug Delivery Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 5127, USA
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 2:1085-96. 2005
    ..Biomimetic materials and systems are presented as exceptional candidates for various controlled drug delivery applications and have enormous potential in medicine for the treatment of disease...
  21. pmc Characterization of pH-responsive hydrogels of poly(itaconic acid-g-ethylene glycol) prepared by UV-initiated free radical polymerization as biomaterials for oral delivery of bioactive agents
    Tania Betancourt
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78741, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 93:175-88. 2010
    ..Studies in Caco-2 colorectal carcinoma cells confirmed the cytocompatibility of these materials at concentrations of up to 5 mg/mL...
  22. pmc Confocal microscopic analysis of transport mechanisms of insulin across the cell monolayer
    Nikhil J Kavimandan
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Int J Pharm 354:143-8. 2008
    ..Results from confocal microscopy analysis of insulin transport in Caco-2 cells indicated that the primary route of transport was the paracellular pathway and that the transcellular component of the transport was insignificant...
  23. pmc Molecular structure of physiologically-responsive hydrogels controls diffusive behavior
    Daniel A Carr
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Macromol Biosci 9:497-505. 2009
    ..The presence of NVP in the systems enhanced swelling. Equilibrium swelling studies revealed that the mesh size was sufficiently large to allow drug diffusion across the networks...
  24. pmc Engineering design and molecular dynamics of mucoadhesive drug delivery systems as targeting agents
    Laura Serra
    Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, Bionanotechnology and Molecular Recognition Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Eur J Pharm Biopharm 71:519-28. 2009
    ..Mucoadhesion depends largely on the structure of the synthetic polymer gels used in controlled release applications...
  25. ncbi request reprint Oral chemotherapeutic delivery: design and cellular response
    James Blanchette
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 33:142-9. 2005
    ..Complexation hydrogels are promising carriers to expand the number of chemotherapeutics capable of being administered orally...
  26. doi request reprint Advances in recognitive, conductive and responsive delivery systems
    Carolyn L Bayer
    Center on Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, Bionanotechnology and Molecular Recognition, Departments of Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    J Control Release 132:216-21. 2008
    ..Selected experimental results are given to indicate the importance and success of these methods...
  27. ncbi request reprint Investigation of the cytotoxicity and insulin transport of acrylic-based copolymer protein delivery systems in contact with Caco-2 cultures
    Aaron C Foss
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Eur J Pharm Biopharm 57:447-55. 2004
    ..The copolymers were shown to open the tight junctions between cells, increasing the available area for diffusion across the cell monolayer, and thus increasing the permeability of insulin across the monolayer...
  28. ncbi request reprint Effect of poly (ethylene glycol) molecular weight and microparticle size on oral insulin delivery from P(MAA-g-EG) microparticles
    Jennifer E López
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Division of Pharmaceutics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 0231, USA
    Drug Dev Ind Pharm 30:497-504. 2004
    ..After 6 hours of exposing the polymer with the insulin solution we achieved approximately 90% of insulin loading...
  29. ncbi request reprint Hydrogels for oral delivery of therapeutic proteins
    Nicholas A Peppas
    University of Texas at Austin, Laboratory for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, Bionanotechnology and Molecular Recognition, Department of Chemical Engineering, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Expert Opin Biol Ther 4:881-7. 2004
    ..Most popular carriers include advanced designs of swollen hydrogels prepared from neutral or intelligent polymeric networks. In this review, the most successful of such systems are presented and their promise in the field described...
  30. pmc The effect of complexation hydrogels on insulin transport in intestinal epithelial cell models
    Kristy M Wood
    Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Acta Biomater 6:48-56. 2010
    ..Insulin permeability was increased 5-fold in the presence of P(MAA-g-EG) and P(MAA-g-EG) WGA. Overall, it is clear that P(MAA-g-EG) WGA enhances insulin absorption and holds great promise as an oral insulin delivery system...
  31. ncbi request reprint Floating hot-melt extruded tablets for gastroretentive controlled drug release system
    Mamoru Fukuda
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Control Release 115:121-9. 2006
    ..The drug release profiles and buoyancy of the floating HME tablets were stable when stored at 40 degrees C/75%RH for 3 months...
  32. ncbi request reprint Drug transport mechanisms and release kinetics from molecularly designed poly(acrylic acid-g-ethylene glycol) hydrogels
    Laura Serra
    Biomaterials, Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Biomaterials 27:5440-51. 2006
    ..Their versatility to be designed with specifically tuned release properties renders these biomaterials promising pharmaceutical carriers for therapeutic agents...
  33. ncbi request reprint Development of acrylic-based copolymers for oral insulin delivery
    Aaron C Foss
    Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Molecular Recognition Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, Division of Pharmaceutics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Eur J Pharm Biopharm 57:163-9. 2004
    ..The insulin loaded copolymer nanospheres caused a significant reduction of serum glucose with respect to that of a control animal...
  34. ncbi request reprint In vitro release behavior and stability of insulin in complexation hydrogels as oral drug delivery carriers
    Bumsang Kim
    Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Molecular Recognition Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1 University Station Code C 0400, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Int J Pharm 266:29-37. 2003
    ....
  35. pmc Micro- and nanotechnologies for intelligent and responsive biomaterial-based medical systems
    Mary Caldorera-Moore
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0238, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 61:1391-401. 2009
    ..More importantly, MEMS- and NEMS-based tissue regeneration scaffolds, biosensors, and drug delivery devices provide new opportunities to mimic the natural intelligence and response of biological systems...
  36. ncbi request reprint Recognitive biomimetic networks with moiety imprinting for intelligent drug delivery
    Mark E Byrne
    Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Molecular Recognition Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas, University Code 0C400, Austin, Texas 78712 0231, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 84:137-47. 2008
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Properties of sustained release hot-melt extruded tablets containing chitosan and xanthan gum
    Mamoru Fukuda
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    Int J Pharm 310:90-100. 2006
    ....
  38. pmc Enhanced core hydrophobicity, functionalization and cell penetration of polybasic nanomatrices
    Omar Z Fisher
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78752, USA
    Pharm Res 26:51-60. 2009
    ..The nanomatrices were also evaluated in vitro as nanocarriers for targeted intracellular delivery of macromolecules...
  39. doi request reprint Analyzing polyaniline-poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid) biocompatibility with 3T3 fibroblasts
    Carolyn L Bayer
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center on Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, Bionanotechnology and Molecular Recognition, 1 University Station, C 0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 21:623-34. 2010
    ..These results indicate that this type of template synthesized PANI could be successfully implemented as a functional, conductive biomaterial...
  40. ncbi request reprint Opsonization, biodistribution, and pharmacokinetics of polymeric nanoparticles
    Donald E Owens
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0400, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Int J Pharm 307:93-102. 2006
    ..This method creates a hydrophilic protective layer around the nanoparticles that is able to repel the absorption of opsonin proteins via steric repulsion forces, thereby blocking and delaying the first step in the opsonization process...
  41. pmc Synthesis and characterization of insulin-transferrin conjugates
    Nikhil J Kavimandan
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 17:1376-84. 2006
    ..ESI-MS studies confirmed the site-specific modifications of insulin. The transferrin conjugation of insulin was also shown to increase the stability of insulin to enzymatic degradation...
  42. pmc Parameter set uniqueness and confidence limits in model identification of insulin transport models from simulation data
    Terry G Farmer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas 78712 0231, USA
    Diabetes Technol Ther 10:128-41. 2008
    ..However, such models are only useful when model parameters are effectively estimated with patient data...
  43. doi request reprint Development of a protein sensing device utilizing interactions between polyaniline and a polymer acid dopant
    Carolyn L Bayer
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center on Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, Bionanotechnology and Molecular Recognition, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0400, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    Biomed Microdevices 12:435-42. 2010
    ..The demonstration of a conductive polymer which is responsive to proteins at physiological conditions is a step towards the integration of these materials into implantable sensing systems...
  44. ncbi request reprint Temperature-responsive polymer-gold nanocomposites as intelligent therapeutic systems
    Donald E Owens
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0400, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 83:692-5. 2007
    ..Dynamic light scattering was used to examine the temperature swelling response of the IPN particles. Zeta-potential analysis was used to confirm the successful PEGylation of the final nanocomposite system...
  45. pmc The future of open- and closed-loop insulin delivery systems
    Terry G Farmer
    Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, TX 78712 0231, USA
    J Pharm Pharmacol 60:1-13. 2008
    ....
  46. ncbi request reprint Is the oral route possible for peptide and protein drug delivery?
    Mariko Morishita
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University, Ebara 2 4 41, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142 8501, Japan
    Drug Discov Today 11:905-10. 2006
    ..Clearly, it is essential that these approaches maintain the biological activity of the proteins...
  47. ncbi request reprint Molecular imprinting within hydrogels
    Mark E Byrne
    NSF Program on Therapeutic and Diagnostic Devices, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 54:149-61. 2002
    ..We discuss the challenges creating an imprinting effect in hydrogels and the possibilities of using molecularly imprinted mechanisms within controlled release gels...
  48. ncbi request reprint Synthesis and characterization of pH-sensitive glycopolymers for oral drug delivery systems
    Bumsang Kim
    Biomaterials and Drug Delivery Laboratories, School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 1283, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 13:1271-81. 2002
    ..2) and between 70 and 111 A in the swollen state (at pH 7.0). Finally, as the cross-linking ratio of the copolymer increased, the swelling ratio of the hydrogels decreased at both pH 2.2 and 7.0...
  49. ncbi request reprint Mucosal insulin delivery systems based on complexation polymer hydrogels: effect of particle size on insulin enteral absorption
    Mariko Morishita
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University, Ebara 2 4 41, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142 8501, Japan
    J Control Release 97:115-24. 2004
    ..These results imply that the particle size and delivery site are very important factors for ILP with respect to increasing the bioavailability of insulin following oral administration...
  50. ncbi request reprint Gastrointestinal transit and mucoadhesive characteristics of complexation hydrogels in rats
    Takahiro Goto
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
    J Pharm Sci 95:462-9. 2006
    ..These findings indicated that the hydrogels may be a promising tool for improving oral bioavailability of various drugs, which are poorly absorbed from the GI tract...
  51. ncbi request reprint Physicochemical behavior and cytotoxic effects of p(methacrylic acid-g-ethylene glycol) nanospheres for oral delivery of proteins
    Madeline Torres-Lugo
    NSF Program on Therapeutic and Diagnostic Devices, School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 1283, USA
    J Control Release 80:197-205. 2002
    ....
  52. ncbi request reprint Novel oral insulin delivery systems based on complexation polymer hydrogels: single and multiple administration studies in type 1 and 2 diabetic rats
    Mariko Morishita
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University, Ebara, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
    J Control Release 110:587-94. 2006
    ..These results indicate that the blood glucose levels of diabetic rats can be effectively controlled by oral SS-ILP administration, and thus SS-ILP would be a promising delivery carrier of insulin via the oral route...
  53. ncbi request reprint Responsive and recognitive hydrogels using star polymers
    Ebru Oral
    School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 68:439-47. 2004
    ..Using copolymerization with methacrylic acid, we prepared star polymer networks with pH-sensitivity, which showed a sharp transition in swelling around a pH of 4.5...
  54. ncbi request reprint Preparation of stable insulin-loaded nanospheres of poly(ethylene glycol) macromers and N-isopropyl acrylamide
    William Leobandung
    Biomaterials and Drug Delivery Laboratories, School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, W Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
    J Control Release 80:357-63. 2002
    ..The ability of the nanoparticles to protect the insulin from high temperature and high shear stress made the system a good candidate as a carrier for insulin for fluidized bed coating technology...
  55. ncbi request reprint Cellular evaluation of insulin transmucosal delivery
    Jennifer E López
    School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 1283, USA
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 15:385-96. 2004
    ..However, decreased microparticle sizes and short PEG chains systems led to higher permeability values. Insulin-loaded P(MAA-g-EG) microparticles enhanced the transport of insulin through the Caco-2 cell monolayers...
  56. ncbi request reprint Loading and mobility of spin-labeled insulin in physiologically responsive complexation hydrogels intended for oral administration
    Ahmed Besheer
    Department of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Martin Luther University Halle Wittenberg, Wolfgang Langenbeck Str 4, 06120 Halle Saale, Germany
    J Control Release 111:73-80. 2006
    ..These studies will aid in the optimization of the system, and will be a basis for subsequent in vivo ESR investigations...
  57. ncbi request reprint Chronobiology, drug delivery, and chronotherapeutics
    Michael H Smolensky
    School of Public Health, RAS, W606, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 1200 Herman Pressler, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 59:828-51. 2007
    ....
  58. ncbi request reprint pH-Sensitive hydrogels as gastrointestinal tract absorption enhancers: transport mechanisms of salmon calcitonin and other model molecules using the Caco-2 cell model
    Madeline Torres-Lugo
    NSF Program on Therapeutic and Diagnostic Devices, School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 1283, USA
    Biotechnol Prog 18:612-6. 2002
    ..The comparison of the transport behavior of dextran and calcitonin revealed that the main transport mechanism for salmon calcitonin through epithelial cell monolayers is predominantly paracellular...
  59. ncbi request reprint Polymers and gels as molecular recognition agents
    Nicholas A Peppas
    Department of Biochemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 1283, USA
    Pharm Res 19:578-87. 2002
    ..The results are encouraging for further investigation and design of synthetic gels with programmable collapsed structure might be achieved...
  60. ncbi request reprint Elucidation of the mechanism of incorporation of insulin in controlled release systems based on complexation polymers
    Mariko Morishita
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University, Ebara 2 4 41, Shinagawa, 142 8501, Tokyo, Japan
    J Control Release 81:25-32. 2002
    ..These data suggest that gels containing equimolar amounts of MAA:EG have the potential to be used as an oral carrier of peptide drugs, especially for insulin...
  61. ncbi request reprint Characterization of insulin protection properties of complexation hydrogels in gastric and intestinal enzyme fluids
    Tetsuo Yamagata
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University, Ebara 2 4 41, Shinagawa, Tokyo, 142 8501, Japan
    J Control Release 112:343-9. 2006
    ....
  62. ncbi request reprint Network structure of cellulose ethers used in pharmaceutical applications during swelling and at equilibrium
    Saia Baumgartner
    University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy, Slovenia
    Pharm Res 19:1084-90. 2002
    ....
  63. ncbi request reprint Microfabricated drug delivery devices
    J Zachary Hilt
    Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
    Int J Pharm 306:15-23. 2005
    ..Such devices seek to develop a platform of well controlled functions in the micro- or nano-level. They include nanoparticulate systems, recognitive molecular systems, biosensing devices, and microfabricated and microelectronic devices...
  64. ncbi request reprint Hydrophilic molecularly imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl-methacrylate) polymers
    Ebru Oral
    Biomaterials and Drug Delivery Laboratories, School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 78:205-10. 2006
    ..This work showed that using pairs of hydrogen-bonding monomers and templates, selective, high-affinity sites could be created despite nonspecific binding...
  65. ncbi request reprint Assemblage of novel release modules for the development of adaptable drug delivery systems
    Elena Losi
    Pharmaceutical Department, University of Parma, Via delle Scienze 27 A, 43100 Parma, Italy
    J Control Release 111:212-8. 2006
    ..The module assemblage shows different drug release behavior depending on the geometry of assembled systems...

Research Grants16

  1. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    Nicholas Peppas; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..investigation of the conjugate delivery and transport from the formulations developed above through HT29-MTX/CaCo-2 cocultures, and in vivo studies of delivery of the conjugated insulin by the complexation hydrogels ..
  2. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    Nicholas Peppas; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..hydrogels, investigation of the conjugate delivery and transport from the formulations developed above through HT29-MTX/CaCo-2 cocultures, and in vivo studies of delivery of the conjugated insulin by the complexation hydrogels ..
  3. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..hydrogels, investigation of the conjugate delivery and transport from the formulations developed above through HT29-MTX/CaCo-2 cocultures, and in vivo studies of delivery of the conjugated insulin by the complexation hydrogels ..
  4. pH Sensitive Complex Hydrogels for Protein Drug Release
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..hydrogels, investigation of the conjugate delivery and transport from the formulations developed above through HT29-MTX/CaCo-2 cocultures, and in vivo studies of delivery of the conjugated insulin by the complexation hydrogels ..
  5. PH SENSITIVE COMPLEX HYDROGEL FOR PROTEIN DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Finally, the insulin delivery efficacy of these novel devices will be tested using in vivo experiments. ..
  6. PH SENSITIVE COMPLEX HYDROGEL FOR PROTEIN DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..Finally, the insulin delivery efficacy of these novel devices will be tested using in vivo experiments. ..
  7. PH-SENSITIVE HYDROGELS FOR DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1992
    ..The mesh size is determined experimentally by equilibrium swelling studies. Models are developed for the pH sensitivity of the degree of swelling and the dynamic swelling of these hydrogels...
  8. PH-SENSITIVE HYDROGELS FOR DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1991
    ..The mesh size is determined experimentally by equilibrium swelling studies. Models are developed for the pH sensitivity of the degree of swelling and the dynamic swelling of these hydrogels...
  9. PH-SENSITIVE HYDROGELS FOR DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1990
    ..The mesh size is determined experimentally by equilibrium swelling studies. Models are developed for the pH sensitivity of the degree of swelling and the dynamic swelling of these hydrogels...
  10. PH SENSITIVE COMPLEX HYDROGEL FOR PROTEIN DRUG RELEASE
    NIKOLAOS PEPPAS; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..Finally, the insulin delivery efficacy of these novel devices will be tested using in vivo experiments. ..