Ingrid M Parker

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Mating patterns and rates of biological invasion
    Ingrid M Parker
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:13695-6. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint When there is no escape: the effects of natural enemies on native, invasive, and noninvasive plants
    Ingrid M Parker
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 1156 High Street, EEB EMS, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 88:1210-24. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Trait-mediated interactions and lifetime fitness of the invasive plant Centaurea solstitialis
    Sarah M Swope
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 91:2284-93. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Origins and close relatives of a semi-domesticated neotropical fruit tree: Chrysophyllum cainito (Sapotaceae)
    Jennifer J Petersen
    Department of Plant Sciences, Mail Stop 2, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA
    Am J Bot 99:585-604. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Widespread seed limitation affects plant density but not population trajectory in the invasive plant Centaurea solstitialis
    Sarah M Swope
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Oecologia 164:117-28. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Invading populations of an ornamental shrub show rapid life history evolution despite genetic bottlenecks
    Katrina M Dlugosch
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Ecol Lett 11:701-9. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Direct and interactive effects of enemies and mutualists on plant performance: a meta-analysis
    William F Morris
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0338, USA
    Ecology 88:1021-9. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Biotic interactions and plant invasions
    Charles E Mitchell
    Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3280, USA
    Ecol Lett 9:726-40. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Projecting rates of spread for invasive species
    Michael G Neubert
    Biology Department, MS 34, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
    Risk Anal 24:817-31. 2004

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. pmc Mating patterns and rates of biological invasion
    Ingrid M Parker
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:13695-6. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint When there is no escape: the effects of natural enemies on native, invasive, and noninvasive plants
    Ingrid M Parker
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 1156 High Street, EEB EMS, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 88:1210-24. 2007
    ..Therefore, although herbivores preferred native over introduced species, escape from pest pressure cannot be used to explain why some introduced clovers are common invaders in coastal prairie while others are not...
  3. ncbi request reprint Trait-mediated interactions and lifetime fitness of the invasive plant Centaurea solstitialis
    Sarah M Swope
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 91:2284-93. 2010
    ..Likewise, relatively tractable weed-biocontrol systems allow us to examine multispecies interactions that can be difficult to study experimentally in native systems that are composed of numerous species with well-established populations...
  4. doi request reprint Origins and close relatives of a semi-domesticated neotropical fruit tree: Chrysophyllum cainito (Sapotaceae)
    Jennifer J Petersen
    Department of Plant Sciences, Mail Stop 2, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA
    Am J Bot 99:585-604. 2012
    ..It is known to be native to the neotropics, but the precise geographic origins of wild and cultivated forms are unresolved...
  5. doi request reprint Widespread seed limitation affects plant density but not population trajectory in the invasive plant Centaurea solstitialis
    Sarah M Swope
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Oecologia 164:117-28. 2010
    ..Thus, flowering plant density is reduced by the established biocontrol agents, but seed production compensates to replace the population every generation, and no long-term decline is predicted...
  6. doi request reprint Invading populations of an ornamental shrub show rapid life history evolution despite genetic bottlenecks
    Katrina M Dlugosch
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Ecol Lett 11:701-9. 2008
    ..These life history changes are consistent with predictions for invasive plants. Our results highlight the potential for even genetically depauperate founding populations to adapt and evolve invasive patters of spread...
  7. ncbi request reprint Direct and interactive effects of enemies and mutualists on plant performance: a meta-analysis
    William F Morris
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0338, USA
    Ecology 88:1021-9. 2007
    ..We discuss how observed differences in effect size might be confounded with methodological differences among studies...
  8. ncbi request reprint Biotic interactions and plant invasions
    Charles E Mitchell
    Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3280, USA
    Ecol Lett 9:726-40. 2006
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Projecting rates of spread for invasive species
    Michael G Neubert
    Biology Department, MS 34, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
    Risk Anal 24:817-31. 2004
    ..For illustrative purposes, we apply these models to Cytisus scoparius, a large shrub in the legume family that is considered a noxious invasive species in eastern and western North America, Chile, Australia, and New Zealand...